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is it possible to realloc memory from a pointer to NULL in C?

int *v = 0;
for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)
  v = (int *) realloc(v, (i+1)*sizeof(int));
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Yes, but this code leaks memory and loses your data when realloc fails. –  R.. Mar 29 '11 at 12:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If ptr is NULL, then the call is equivalent to malloc(size), for all values of size.

Source: man 3 realloc

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"In case that ptr is NULL, the function behaves exactly as malloc, assigning a new block of size bytes and returning a pointer to the beginning of it."

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdlib/realloc/

By the way, I know this code is only for the question but you should always check the return value of realloc before updating your pointer:

int *p,*tmp;

tmp = (int *)realloc(p, nBytes);
if(tmp){
  p = tmp;
}
else{
  //Out of memory!
}

If you don't, you will lose your reference to your allocated memory when realloc fails.

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Good hint, keeping reference to the allocated memory when using realloc() –  Philip Mar 29 '11 at 10:56

From the Standard

7.20.3.4/3 ... If ptr is a null pointer, the realloc function behaves like the malloc function for the specified size.

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From the manpage:

If ptr is NULL, the call is equivalent to malloc(size); if size is equal to zero, the call is equivalent to free(ptr). Unless ptr is NULL, it must have been returned by an earlier call to malloc(), calloc() or realloc().

However, you shouldn't forget that realloc() can return NULL if it can't resize the memory. The code you posted could result in more than one block of memory being allocated if this happens, because the NULL return value will be fed back into realloc() which will then allocate a new block. (Hopefully you aren't really using that code anyway...)

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yes.

from here

If ptr is a null pointer, realloc() behaves like malloc() for the specified size.

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heh - seems we were all answering that around the same time :| –  pentaphobe Mar 29 '11 at 6:10

From realloc man page:

realloc() changes the size of the memory block pointed to by ptr to size bytes. The contents will be unchanged to the minimum of the old and new sizes; newly allocated memory will be uninitialized. If ptr is NULL, the call is equivalent to malloc(size); if size is equal to zero, the call is equivalent to free(ptr). Unless ptr is NULL, it must have been returned by an earlier call to malloc(), calloc() or realloc(). If the area pointed to was moved, a free(ptr) is done.

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