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This is the program:

#include<stdio.h>  

void main() {
    int *x,*y;
    int a=23,b=56;

    x=&a;
    y=&b;

    printf("%d\t%d",x,y);

    x++;
    y++;

    /* here only x is incremented but y remains same. What is the reason? */
    printf("\n%d\t%d",x,y);
}

i.e x is incremented by 2.But y remains as it is. How?

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1  
x incremented by 2? What is your platform and compiler? Some microcontroller? –  jdehaan Mar 29 '11 at 6:14
3  
It's %p for pointers, not %d. –  CAFxX Mar 29 '11 at 6:18
2  
Why on earth you want to use turbo C and that too on a win 7 ? Its a very old compiler. –  Asha Mar 29 '11 at 6:23
2  
Win 7 and Turbo C. That's like trying to genetically engineer a cross between Mr Spock and a trilobite :-) Seriously, get a decent compiler if you can. GCC has Windows ports and even MS gives away their express edition. I realise that may not be possible as, for some ungodly reason, Indian universities seem hell-bent on churning out sub-par coders with experience only in dead compilers that the standards have left behind. They're really not doing anyone any favours there. –  paxdiablo Mar 29 '11 at 6:29
1  
@paxdiablo: sad but true - and it's not just the prehistoric compilers - the teaching is all based on some truly awful books from the Turbo C era (1980s) - Kanetkar seems to be the worst offender (Let Us C, etc). –  Paul R Mar 29 '11 at 7:13
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6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

There is no guarantee that your pointers are the same size as your integers so you realy shouldn't be using %d as the format specifier.

I've seen problems similar to this when people pass long variables to printf with a specifier for an int. Because the long was wider than the int, it confused printf regarding where things were on the stack.

You should be using %p for pointers. There are also numerous other problems with that code, standards-wise. Try the following as a starting point:

#include <stdio.h>

int main (void) {
    int *x, *y;
    int a = 23, b = 56;

    x=&a; y=&b;
    printf ("%p  %p\n", x, y);

    x++; y++;
    printf ("%p  %p\n", x, y);

    return 0;
}

Here's one possible explanation (thanks to the comment from Michael Burr):

Let's say your pointer are 32 bits and your integers are 16 bits and that you are on a little-endian architecture (like Intel).

Further, assume the address of a is 0x12345678 and the address of b is 0x1234567a.

When you pass them to printf, you push two 32-bit values on the stack but printf only reads two 16-bit values since it's been told that with the %d %d format specifiers:

       himem
      --------
    / | 0x12 |
push  | 0x34 |
   |  | 0x56 |
    \ | 0x78 |
      --------
    / | 0x12 | \ printf reads 0x1234
push  | 0x34 | /
   |  | 0x56 | \ printf reads 0x567a
    \ | 0x7a | /
      --------
       lomem

Then, when you increment both pointers and call printf again, you get:

       himem
      --------
    / | 0x12 |
push  | 0x34 |
   |  | 0x56 |
    \ | 0x7a |
      --------
    / | 0x12 | \ printf reads 0x1234
push  | 0x34 | /
   |  | 0x56 | \ printf reads 0x567c
    \ | 0x7c | /
      --------
       lomem

So you can see in that scenario why it might look as if only one pointer had been incremented but the real problem is that you're not printing the pointers, rather you're printing the most significant half of one of them (which probably won't change) and the least significant half of that same one (which will change).

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2  
Exactly: it's %p for pointers, not %d. –  CAFxX Mar 29 '11 at 6:22
1  
I think you hit on it - since he's using Turbo C, I'll bet the int's are 16 bits and the pointers are 32-bit segmented far pointers... –  Michael Burr Mar 29 '11 at 6:23
    
Turbo C may not understand %p (I don't remember to be honest). But the fact remains: format specifiers MUST match the parameter types so it is definitely wrong to use %d for pointers. If %p is not available typecast may be used: printf("%u %u", (unsigned)x, (unsigned)y ); –  Serge Dundich Mar 29 '11 at 6:55
    
@ paxdiablo Thank you.But even then, is it possible to print the increments in integer format? –  Suhail Gupta Mar 29 '11 at 7:27
    
@Suhail, provided you understand the data layouts, you can. It's not portable but you could try something like: printf ("0x%04x%04x\n" myTwoIntPointer);. That way you push 32 bits (the pointer) and print two 16-bit values joined together to look like one. –  paxdiablo Mar 29 '11 at 7:34
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how about... int *x; int *y; instead of int *x,*y;

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5  
That won't change anything. –  codaddict Mar 29 '11 at 6:18
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Hi you increment your pointer address not value use (*x)++ (*y)++

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In your code you are accessing a pointer and incrementing a pointer. What you might wanted to do is this:

void main() {
  int *x,*y;
  int a=23,b=56;
  x=&a;
  y=&b;
  printf("%d\t%d",*x,*y);
  (*x)++;
  (*y)++;
  printf("\n%d\t%d",*x,*y);
  return 0;
}

Notice the (*x)++ and (*y)++ to access the value of the pointer, because it is this, you want to increment. If you write x++ or y++ you increment the pointer itself, meaning you push the address on where it is pointing at forward. This leads in your case to undefined values.

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@ Woltan i want to increment the address. –  Suhail Gupta Mar 29 '11 at 6:25
    
Oh, ok then never mind the code above ;) Just be careful not to run into not allocated memory since this could lead to segmentation faults. –  Woltan Mar 29 '11 at 6:41
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you're incrementing the pointers, not the values if that's any help.

I can't tell you more, since that source doesn't actually compile and gives you roughly the same warning I did :)

#include<stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
        int *x,*y;
        int a=23,b=56;
        x=&a;
        y=&b;
        printf("%d\t\t%d",*x,*y);
        x++;
        y++;
        printf("\n%d\t\t%d",*x,*y);
        return 0;
}

that will compile, and shows the contents - on my compiler that results in the following output:

23      56
1606415920      23

(I put the two '\t' per line to guarantee separation of values, this doesn't affect the rest of the code)

since I assume you want the code to increment a and b the code would be as follows:

#include<stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
        int *x,*y;
        int a=23,b=56;
        x=&a;
        y=&b;
        printf("%d\t\t%d",*x,*y);
        (*x)++;
        (*y)++;
        printf("\n%d\t\t%d",*x,*y);
        return 0;
}

which prints:

23      56
24      57
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Please the program :

#include<stdio.h>
void main() {
    int *x= NULL;
    int *y = NULL;
    int a=23,b=56;
    x=&a;
    y=&b;
    printf("%x\t%x",x,y);
    x++;
    y++;
    printf("\n%x\t%x",x,y);
}

I beleive it should be fine then.Only the values are intialized properly.

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I fixed your formatting but, honestly, your answer will not make a difference. Whether they're initialised to NULL or not, they're still set before use: x=&a; y=&b;. –  paxdiablo Mar 29 '11 at 6:31
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