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Hello World for D looks like this:

import std.stdio;

void main(string[] args)
{
    writeln("Hello World, Reloaded");
}

from http://www.digitalmars.com/d/

But when I compile that with gdc-4.4.5 I get:

hello.d:5: Error: undefined identifier writeln, did you mean function writefln?
hello.d:5: Error: function expected before (), not __error of type _error_

Is this a D1/D2 thing? A library thing? It seems odd that writefln is a stdio library function and writeln is not.

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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes, writeln is only available in D2's standard library.

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And, as far as I can tell, gdc currently only supports D1—which explains why this is an issue. –  jgottula Mar 29 '11 at 8:13
    
Why do you think it only supports D1? –  CyberShadow Mar 29 '11 at 8:55
3  
gdc definitely suports D2: bitbucket.org/goshawk/gdc/wiki/Home –  Jonathan M Davis Mar 29 '11 at 9:26
    
I suspect this bug is relevant bitbucket.org/goshawk/gdc/issue/159/let-gdc-invoke-d1-or-d2 –  KarlM Mar 29 '11 at 10:55
    
@Jonathan: My mistake. I was looking at the older gdc website, which hadn't been updated since 2007. –  jgottula Mar 29 '11 at 21:19
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As CyberShadow mentions, writeln is only in D2. The difference between them is writeln just prints its arguments as-is, while writefln interprets its first argument as a format string, like C's printf.

Example:

import std.stdio;

void main() {
    // Prints "There have been 44 U.S. presidents."  Note that %s can be used
    // to print the default string representation for any type.
    writefln("There have been %s U.S. presidents.", 44);

    // Same thing
    writeln("There have been ", 44, " U.S. presidents.");
}
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