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I am hoping that someone can help me answer this question.

I am writing a web app with JQUERY. Recently I downloaded IE9 for testing purposes and I found that the document.ready() event was not firing on the app. It seems to work fine in FF4 and in Chrome but the event completely does not fire.

After that I decided to give the 64bit version of IE9 a try and found that everything works just fine in that version. I have enabled the developer tools in IE( and tried to debug the JS but nothing gets flagged and the app does not break on any errors.

Can someone weigh in here and maybe explain why the document.ready() event would not be firing? How can I tell what is breaking the app if the developer tools don't pick up anything? Also, why would everything work just fine in the 64bit version and not the 32bit?

Thanks!

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Off topic, but you might want to read this article which compares IE9 32bit and IE9 64bit, plus all the other main browsers. Their conclusion is that the 64bit version is "shockingly bad". Make of that what you will. It's off-topic for your question, but I thought it was worth mentioning, since you've noticed differences between the two versions. –  Spudley Mar 29 '11 at 8:45
    
@ackerchez: Hi, how are you binding to the document.ready event? When using $(func) or $(document).ready(func), func should always execute, irrespective of if the document.ready event has already fired at the time of the binding. So you should not hit any timing issues here. But if you use $(document).bind("ready", func) that is not the case. –  skarmats Mar 30 '11 at 20:34
    
@ackerchez: Does it work in compatibility mode of IE? If not, try playing around with the "document mode" and "browser mode" drop-downs in the developer tools (F12) at the top right. –  skarmats Mar 30 '11 at 20:35
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@ackerchez: One more - are you using a current version of jQuery? –  skarmats Mar 30 '11 at 20:37
    
Hi, Thanks for the help. I have the page set to use $(document).ready(func(){..}); - this is not working in IE9. The ready event is not firing at all...I even put in an alert and it doesn't show. After I have played around with it, I see that this all has something to do with the document standards for IE9. When I lower the document standards everything works again. What is the difference in the IE9 document standards? I am also on the latest jQuery (1.5.1). –  ackerchez Mar 31 '11 at 9:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

IE9 64bit uses the old javascript engine form IE8 64bit so that's why it is slower and there is a difference.

Wait for the next version of jquery to come out, that might fix compatibility problems :)

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Well, that explains the "shockingly bad" review it got (see my previous comment here). But if that's true, all I can say is wow. Just wow. How did Microsoft ever think that was a good idea??? The whole point of IE9 is to get away from the legacy of IE6/7/8. I've given you a +1 vote for this info, but could you please give us a reference link for it; I'd like confirmation of this because it sounds completely insane. –  Spudley Mar 30 '11 at 21:08
    
@Spudley yes it's a pity, it can also not be used as your default browser yet, only the 32 bit one, even if flash 64bit is already out :( Here is a link: zdnet.com/blog/hardware/… I quote from page 6: This is to be expected given that IE 9 64-bit is using an older, slower JavaScript engine, while IE 9 32-bit was using the newer, more efficient Chakra JIT. –  SnippetSpace Mar 30 '11 at 21:19
    
heh, thanks! it was right there in the page I'd linked to already. :-) –  Spudley Mar 30 '11 at 21:22
    
@ackerchez could you mark this as resolved? :) –  SnippetSpace Apr 1 '11 at 9:09

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