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I need the flexibility of being able to change parameters passed around to different functions, depending from where the call to the function happened, so I decided I'd put all my parameters in a struct, however most of these parameters are structs or classes themselves and I want to have the option of leaving them NULL, so I have to pass pointers to the structs/classes.

struct A
{
    otherB* b;  // NULL should be a valid value
    otherC* c;
};

However my question is now, passing A around these pointers will be the only thing copied, so if I did the following there would be a problem right?

void func(A& a) //non const cause I wanna change contents of A.
{
   a.b = new b();
}

A myA;
otherC somec; // all these are currently automatic variables in my pgm.
myA.c = &somec;

func(myA);  //myA goes out of scope? so I've lost all pointers assigned and since somec is out of scope too, I have a problem?

What would the best way to resolve something like this+ I want the flexibility of being able to pass NULL to any of my parameters, however not sure if using raw pointers everywhere is a good idea?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

To solve the problem of resource management, you should use boost::shared_ptr (or std::shared_ptr in C++0x).

struct A
{
    boost::shared_ptr< otherB > b;
    boost::shared_ptr< otherC > c;
};

void func(A& a)
{
   a.b = boost::make_shared< otherB >();
}

A myA;
otherC somec;
myA.c = boost::shared_ptr< otherC >(&somec, null_deleter());

func(myA);

When myA goes out of scope, all resources are deallocated automatically. Since somec was allocated on the stack, we wrapped it in a shared_ptr that uses a null_deleter, that could look like this:

struct null_deleter {
    void operator()(void *) { }
};

This will not delete the object, it will do nothing (which is just what we want for stack-allocated objects). Keep in mind however, that you have to make sure that somec lives longer than myA, otherwise you will get access violations.

share|improve this answer
    
so what is the point of the deleter if it does nothing? – Tony The Lion Mar 29 '11 at 8:30
1  
It prevents the shared_ptr from trying to delete a stack-allocated object, which would end in disaster. – Björn Pollex Mar 29 '11 at 8:31
    
But what's the point of shared_ptr to begin with, if you're using objects on the stack? If something else can cause the object to be deleted, shared_ptr shouldn't be used. – James Kanze Mar 29 '11 at 9:00
    
@James: Flexibility. If you want your code to be able to deal with both, and you do not know up-front if objects will be stack-allocated or not. – Björn Pollex Mar 29 '11 at 9:02
    
Flexibility for what. In this case, his problem is, or seems to be, that somec doesn't have a long enough lifetime. Putting it in a shared_ptr isn't going to change that, and using the null_deleter will guarantee that shared_ptr's most important invariant will be violated. If objects can be copied, there's almost never any point of allocating them dynamically, and if objects are never allocated dynamically, there's no sense in using shared_ptr. – James Kanze Mar 29 '11 at 13:55

boost::optional<> Allows you to test if the field is set or not.

Simple example (will not compile, I've not even remotely tested it, in theory this is how it should work)

struct params
{
  boost::optional<int> a;
  boost::optional<foo> b;
  boost::optional<bar> c;
};

void func(params& p)
{
  if (p.a)
  {
    // do stuff with a
  }
  if (p.b)
  {
    // do stuff with b
  }
  if (p.c)
  { 
    // do stuff with c
  }
  else
    p.c = bar(); // again copy constructed and now initialized...
}

params p;
p.a = 1;
p.b = foo(); // copy constructed, however you can store a reference in the optional too.
// c is uninitialized

func(p);

// when p goes out of scope, everything is gone..
share|improve this answer

You basically have to analyze ownership, i.e. who can allocate and who is responsible for deleting object once they no longer is used.

One thing that is important to remember is that if you mix dynamically allocated things and things placed on the stack, you simply can't apply delete on them, as it's not possible to delete things on the stack.

One way could be to only use new and define a destructor in A that deletes all it's pointers. Another way could be a place where you would register objects that later should be deleted. Or you could go the route of using existing reference-counting tools, as suggested in other answers.

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No, your idea of the scope of myA and somec are wrong. There's nothing wrong with what you have right now- although I personally think that references would be a superior option to pointers.

void func(A& a) //non const cause I wanna change contents of A.
{
    a.b = new b();
}


int main() {
    A myA;
    otherC somec; // all these are currently automatic variables in my pgm.
    myA.c = &somec;

    func(myA);
    // myA and somec are still perfectly in scope to be saved, or deleted, or w/e as you like
}
share|improve this answer
    
References cannot be null though, I need NULL to be a valid value! – Tony The Lion Mar 29 '11 at 9:17

It's not clear from your description, but if you're having a problem because somec is going out of scope, it can only be because func is saving a copy of the pointer. Don't do that: in funct, copy the object, not the pointer.

PS: if most of the pointers are null most of the time, you should consider using something like following syntactic sugar:

struct A
{
    //  pointer members...
    A() : // ... set all pointers to null...
    A& withB( B const& someB ) { otherB = &someB; return *this ; }
    A& withC( C const& someC ) { otherC = &someC; return *this ; }
    //  And so on for all of the rest of the pointers.
};

func( A().withC( somec ) );

Don't know if it's appropriate for your situation, but it's often convenient.

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