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I want to create a comparator to operate such that a process with a lower arrival time will appear first in a sorting, and if two processes have the same arrival time, the one with the lower process id comes first in the sorting. I tried the following code, but it doesn't seem to be working. Does anyone see a flaw in it?

public class FCFSComparator implements Comparator<Process>
{
    public int compare(Process o1, Process o2)
    {
        int result = o1.getArrivalTime() - o2.getArrivalTime();

        if(result == 0)
        {
            return (o1.getPid() < o2.getPid()) ? -1 : 1;
        }
        else
        {
            return result;
        }
//        return (result != 0 ? result : o1.getPid() - o2.getPid());
    }
}

To be specific, given the processes as follows

pid = 0 arrival time = 10
pid = 1 arrival time = 30
pid = 2 arrival time = 15
pid = 3 arrival time = 15
pid = 4 arrival time = 66

I get the following ordering at the end

Pid = 0 arrival time = 10
Pid = 2 arrival time = 15
Pid = 1 arrival time = 30
Pid = 4 arrival time = 66
Pid = 3 arrival time = 15
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2  
What exactly is not working? –  Björn Pollex Mar 29 '11 at 8:34
    
Please be more specific than "doesn't seem to be working". What are you doing with this? What did you hope would happen? What, exactly, happens instead? –  Gareth McCaughan Mar 29 '11 at 8:34
    
What exactly is the error? Sorts the wrong way? –  Peeter Mar 29 '11 at 8:37
1  
Can you given an example where it does not work and what you expected to happen? –  Peter Lawrey Mar 29 '11 at 8:39
    
Bruno Conde helped me figure it out. The comparator it turns out wasn't the problem, it was the function that was displaying the values. Lesson learnt is to not use a foreach loop to show the values of a priority list. –  Varun Madiath Mar 29 '11 at 9:02
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I can't find anything wrong with your comparator. Here is my test case:

public class TestComparator {

    static class Process {
        int pid;
        int arrivalTime;

        Process(int pid, int arrivalTime) {
            this.pid = pid;
            this.arrivalTime = arrivalTime;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "Process [pid=" + pid + ", arrivalTime=" + arrivalTime + "]";
        }
    }

    static class FCFSComparator implements Comparator<Process> {
        public int compare(Process o1, Process o2) {
            int result = o1.arrivalTime - o2.arrivalTime;

            if (result == 0) {
                return (o1.pid < o2.pid) ? -1 : 1;
            } else {
                return result;
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Process> processes = Arrays.asList(
                new Process(0, 10),
                new Process(1, 30),
                new Process(2, 15),
                new Process(3, 15),
                new Process(4, 66));

        Collections.sort(processes, new FCFSComparator());

        for (Process process : processes) {
            System.out.println(process);
        }

    }
}

Output:

Process [pid=0, arrivalTime=10]
Process [pid=2, arrivalTime=15]
Process [pid=3, arrivalTime=15]
Process [pid=1, arrivalTime=30]
Process [pid=4, arrivalTime=66]
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You're right. I was using a PriorityList to test my code out, and was using a generic foreach loop to test the output of the values instead of the poll function. –  Varun Madiath Mar 29 '11 at 8:59
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I believe you want this:

public class FCFSComparator implements Comparator<Process> {
    public int compare(Process o1, Process o2) {
        if (o1.getArrivalTime() == o2.getArrivalTime()) {
            return (o1.getPid() < o2.getPid()) ? -1 : 1;
        }
        return (o1.getArrivalTime() < o2.getArrivalTime()) ? -1 : 1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried dropping this in as a replacement, and I got the same output as what my code above gives me. –  Varun Madiath Mar 29 '11 at 8:52
    
Oops, yeah I notice now this is effectively the same thing. I tried your data set and it works for me with either implementation. You might want to try including your Process class, at least the getPid() and getArrivalTime() methods. –  WhiteFang34 Mar 29 '11 at 9:00
    
Those are simple accessor methods. The issue was solved, and right now I'm trying to prevent myself banging my head against the table for being so utterly foolish. –  Varun Madiath Mar 29 '11 at 9:04
    
Hehe, no worries :) At least SO helped you realize the problem. –  WhiteFang34 Mar 29 '11 at 9:11
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I'm making that assumption that the things you are comparing are int. In the case of both variables being equal, you are still returning 1 from the inner comparison. Something like this should help:

public class FCFSComparator implements Comparator<Process>
{
    public int compare(Process o1, Process o2)
    {
        int result = o1.getArrivalTime() - o2.getArrivalTime();
        if (result == 0)
        {
            return o1.getPid() - o2.getPid();
        }
        else
        {
            return result;
        }
    }
}

EDIT: I checked the above code and it does output the correct order. I can only assume you have a bug somewhere else in your code.

Pid = 0 arrival time = 10
Pid = 2 arrival time = 15
Pid = 3 arrival time = 15
Pid = 1 arrival time = 30
Pid = 4 arrival time = 66

The full test code is:

import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        List<Process> processes = new ArrayList<Process>();
        processes.add(new Process(10, 0));
        processes.add(new Process(30, 1));
        processes.add(new Process(15, 2));
        processes.add(new Process(15, 3));
        processes.add(new Process(66, 4));

        Collections.sort(processes, new FCFSComparator());

        for (Process process : processes)
            System.out.println("Pid = " + process.getPid() + " arrival time = " + process.getArrivalTime());
    }

    static class FCFSComparator implements Comparator<Process>
    {
        public int compare(Process o1, Process o2)
        {
            int result = o1.getArrivalTime() - o2.getArrivalTime();
            if (result == 0)
            {
                return o1.getPid() - o2.getPid();
            }
            else
            {
                return result;
            }
        }
    }

    static class Process
    {
        private int arrivalTime;
        private int pid;

        Process(int arrivalTime, int pid)
        {
            this.arrivalTime = arrivalTime;
            this.pid = pid;
        }

        public int getArrivalTime()
        {
            return arrivalTime;
        }

        public int getPid()
        {
            return pid;
        }
    }
}
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This doesn't seem to work. I have the same issue as with my code. –  Varun Madiath Mar 29 '11 at 8:49
    
What is the datatype of pid and arrival time? –  Jon Mar 29 '11 at 8:53
    
@Varun Madiath you tried debuging or printing values of getArrivalTime()? Implementation seems good to me, but it looks like result is always 0 –  dantuch Mar 29 '11 at 8:54
    
I've been debugging it for a while now. All the values seem consistent with what I declared them to be. –  Varun Madiath Mar 29 '11 at 8:55
    
One other point is that generating the compare result with subtraction will fail badly if the numbers are very large negative, very large positive as it will silently overflow an int. –  Jon Mar 29 '11 at 9:17
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The simplest is:

public class FCFSComparator implements Comparator<Process>
{
    public int compare(Process o1, Process o2)
    {
        int timeCmp = Integer.valueOf(o1.getArrivalTime()).compareTo(Integer.valueOf(o2.getArrivalTime()));
        return (timeCmp != 0 ? timeCmp : Integer.valueOf(o1.getPid()).compareTo(Integer.valueOf(o2.getPid())));
    }
}
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