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Lets say, I have to achieve a target sales of 100 in 24 hours using coupons. Now, as the redemption rate would never be 100% (varies normally from 20-50%), I have to float more number of coupons and track the sales occurred, rate of sales occurring, etc. What is the best algorithm to achieve the same? My approach: allocate number of sales expected for each hour (lets day 5 in each of 24hours.) Assume a redemption rate of 20%. So coupons to be floated would be 25. If I get 3 sales in that hour, Then, the target sales for 2nd hour will be 2(previous hour) + 5 = 7. But redemption was less(8%, as only 2 people redeemed) so I will float 7/8% = 88 coupons. 25 -2 = 23 already exist. so i will float 88-23 = 65 coupons and so on.

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agablwablwhadidyasay? –  quasiverse Mar 29 '11 at 9:48
    
What other assumptions are you making? What's the turnaround time on coupons? If they're floated at 10 am when do you expect redemption to occur by? Also, what information do you have say hour-by-hour on sales frequency? Presumably 8 pm will see more sales on average than 4 am. –  orangepips Mar 29 '11 at 10:13
    
The redemption rate will vary with time, hence needs to be monitored every hour. Start with an assumption, and later hours i can use the previous hours value. Yes, sales too will vary hour to hour. –  Snehal Nimje Mar 29 '11 at 10:35
    
Do coupons have an expiration? –  orangepips Mar 29 '11 at 12:55
    
yes coupons have an expiration time of t=2 hours. –  Snehal Nimje Mar 30 '11 at 7:32

2 Answers 2

Just print on the coupon that only the first 100 coupons are valid.

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well this are essentially electronic coupons, once given the customer has the option to redeem it right, else the customers will be unhappy. –  Snehal Nimje Apr 1 '11 at 4:08

If at any moment you have floating more (valid) coupons than what's left from your 100 target, you have a (slight) risk of getting too many redemptions, and it the best algorithm depends on how much risk you can tolerate, and what's the observed distribution over redemption rates at any given hour of the day. If you can't tolerate any risk, then you just always float as many coupons you have left from the target and that's it, i.e.

redeemed = 0
floating = 0
whenever new customer arrives:
  if (redeemed + floating < 100)
    float coupon to customer
    floating = floating + 1
whenever a coupon is redeemed:
   redeemed = redeemed + 1
   floating = floating - 1
whenever a coupon expires:
   floating = floating - 1

If you can tolerate some risk, then let's say that you have a probability function P(t) that gives the probability that a coupon that is floated at time t will get redeemed. You can then proceed like this:

redeemed = 0
expected_redemptions = 0
whenever new customer arrives:
  if (redeemed + expected_redemptions < 100)
     float coupon to customer
     expected_redemptions = expected_redemptions + P(now())
whenever a coupon floated originally at time 't' is redeemed:
  redeemed = redeemed + 1
  expected_redemptions = expected_redemptions - P(t)
whenever a coupon floated originally at time 't' expires:
  expected_redemptions = expected_redemptions - P(t)

This algorithm pushes coupons to customers as long as the expected number of redemptions doesn't exceed 100. The actual number can still exceed 100 because of statistical variance. You would have more information about the redemption rate at given time than a single probability to value to be able to assess risk better. Also your risk model would need to be developed.

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