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The euro symbols in the footer of this page are not displaying correctly

http://fundcentre.newireland.ie/

What is the best way to correct this?

Edit: this html is supplied by a 3rd party. We take it, wrap it around our content, and render the page

Edit Again: just looking at the code, I can see that we read the 3rd party HTML into our solution with the following:

wrapperHtml = System.IO.File.ReadAllText(sWrapperLocation, Encoding.GetEncoding("iso-8859-1")); .. So we're reading it as one encoding and rendering it as the other..

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That seems to be a general encoding problem. The footer also has some broken characters. Note that replacing it by the entity is not the right fix. You should add more details about where that data comes from. Does it come from a database? –  Pekka 웃 Mar 29 '11 at 9:48
    
@Pekka, I've updated that. Thanks –  DaveDev Mar 29 '11 at 9:55
    
you should show or describe the code you're using to fetch it from that 3rd party, and add the necessary server side tags (from your page's source I gather it's ASP.NET). –  Pekka 웃 Mar 29 '11 at 9:56
    
@Pekka, yeah it's ASP.NET (and on that note, I apologise 'cause it's the worst HTML I have ever seen. I didn't write it!!). I think the code that fetches it from the 3rd party is fine because the symbols render fine when I load the wrapper without our content. Maybe it's the way we're injecting our content into it that's causing the problem. I'll have a look at that. –  DaveDev Mar 29 '11 at 10:05
    
I'm not entirely sure because I don't know what comes from where, but try changing iso-8859-1 to utf-8 –  Pekka 웃 Mar 29 '11 at 10:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This looks like UTF-8 data that was somehow interpreted in a ISO-8859-1 context (or some other single byte encoding). Whatever you use to read the 3rd party source may be incorrectly interpreting the data as single-byte while it in fact is UTF-8.

This is about everything that can be said without knowing more about your setup.

Edit: Why fixing this by using entities is a bad idea, copied from my comment:

The problem is not limited to the Euro character, but applies to all characters outside the ISO-8859-1 range. That means that while you can happily replace the € by € without any real damage, the instant a chinese or cyrillic character comes up in your data, you'll have no entity to convert it to. You would have to convert perfectly healthy UTF-8 content into their numeric entities in real time just to avoid having to fix the encoding problem. That is just insane.

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You're making sense. I've just updated the question with something I've noticed in the code. –  DaveDev Mar 29 '11 at 10:26

€ is the entity you are looking for

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The problem in question is an encoding issue. The page is using UTF-8 so there is no reason not to use the native character instead of the entity. –  Pekka 웃 Mar 29 '11 at 9:49
    
so that doesn't work then? –  trickwallett Mar 29 '11 at 9:51
    
@trick it does work, but it's not the right fix for this specific problem. Look into the page's footer, there are more broken characters than just the euro. –  Pekka 웃 Mar 29 '11 at 9:51
    
Pekka - Its a .net site and as such has encoding issues. Depending on how the file is saved (depending on the editor used in windows - including WebDeveloper and its options) and how it is transfered up to the server can muck up the UTF-8 encoding. When I develop, I always use html encoding to mitigate these issues. –  Justin808 Mar 29 '11 at 9:54
    
but maybe the data come from a iso database, and the conversion doesn't get well –  DoubleYo Mar 29 '11 at 9:56

Use HTML encoding; to get a € type a €

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If you are just going to make down an answer, post why you are. The html encoding would solve his display issues. If he encoded all the characters, it would all all his display issues. This is a valid answer. –  Justin808 Mar 29 '11 at 9:56
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@Justin I downvoted all answers suggesting using the entity, because the issue at hand is most likely a solvable encoding problem. Using the entity instead of that underlying problem is a dirty fix. –  Pekka 웃 Mar 29 '11 at 10:04
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@Pekka, we disagree - html encoding is a valid fix and solves the issue, regardless if its hard coded, or encoded via asp.net function. Changing the encoding of the file as stored on disk may or may not be possible; and is another valid answer, but that does not change the fact that html ecoding is valid. Please mark down incorrect answers, not just ones that you disagree with :) –  Justin808 Mar 29 '11 at 10:07
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@Justin believe me, this is not a workable fix. The problem is not limited to the Euro character, but applies to all characters outside the ISO-8859-1 range. That means that while you can happily replace the by € without any real damage, the instant a chinese or cyrillic character comes up in your data, you'll have no entity to convert it to. You would have to convert perfectly healthy UTF-8 content into their numeric entities in real time just to avoid having to fix the encoding problem. That is just insane. –  Pekka 웃 Mar 29 '11 at 10:12
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@Justin I have nothing against dirty fixes when there's no other option left. But suggesting the dirty fix before checking whether it's necessary at all and no caveat that it's a dirty fix is no good, that's my whole point. It seems like the encoding is controllable after all, see OP's update –  Pekka 웃 Mar 29 '11 at 10:29

You are using:

wrapperHtml = System.IO.File.ReadAllText(sWrapperLocation, Encoding.GetEncoding("iso-8859-1"));

Try changing it to:

wrapperHtml = System.IO.File.ReadAllText(sWrapperLocation, System.Text.UTF8Encoding);

That should keep the multi-byte characters correctly.

Edit: Also you could just remove the second argument all together as that will keep the original encoding regardless of what it was.

Update: I know its evil, but try this. If it works, the encoding issue is on your end, somewhere, if it doesn't work the encoding issue is with the file or where you get the file.

wrapperHtml = HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(System.IO.File.ReadAllText(sWrapperLocation));

The above line will trap and encode the multi-byte and single byte characters that need to be for html encoding. For the moment it will take encoding issues off the plate if they are in your code (after this line), with the server, with the transport or with the browser, with the doc types and a lot of other things. If it works, you know the file is in a valid format and your encoding issues are somewhere after the file and you reading in the file.

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Hi Justin, unfortunately none of these worked. I've even tried reading a simple text file which contains only a € symbol. It gets read in as a '?' –  DaveDev Mar 29 '11 at 11:11
    
@Dave did you try removing the second argument completely as well? –  Pekka 웃 Mar 29 '11 at 11:22
    
@Pekka, yes - there's something odd going on!! –  DaveDev Mar 29 '11 at 15:27
    
@Dave - let me know if the update I posed works, even with only some of the characters. –  Justin808 Mar 29 '11 at 18:05

Use HTML code : € or €

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