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I am a newbie to R and I am trying to apply smooth.spline() to a large dataframe. I've looked at the related threads ("Apply a list of n functions to each row of a dataframe,", "How to apply a spline basis matrix",...). Here is my dataframe and what I've tried so far:

> dim(mUnique)  
[1] 4565    9  
> str(mUnique)  
'data.frame':   4565 obs. of  9 variables:  
 $ Group.1: Factor w/ 4565 levels "mal_mito_1","mal_mito_2",..: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...  
 $ h0     : num  0.18 -0.025 0.212 0.015 0.12 ...  
 $ h6     : num  -0.04 -0.305 -0.188 -0.185 -0.09 ...  
 $ h12    : num  -0.86 -1.1 -1.01 -1.04 -0.91 ...  
 $ h18    : num  -0.73 -1.215 -1.222 -0.355 -0.65 ...  
 $ h24    : num  0.04 0.025 -0.143 0.295 0.09 ...  
 $ h30    : num  -0.14 1.275 0.732 -0.015 -0.27 ...  
 $ h36    : num  1.44 1.795 1.627 0.385 0.91 ...  
 $ h42    : num  1.49 1.385 1.397 0.305 1.12 ...  

> head(mUnique)  
          ID      h0      h6     h12     h18     h24     h30    h36    h42  
1      mal_mito_1  0.1800 -0.0400 -0.8600 -0.7300  0.0400 -0.1400 1.4400 1.4900  
2      mal_mito_2 -0.0250 -0.3050 -1.1050 -1.2150  0.0250  1.2750 1.7950 1.3850  
3      mal_mito_3  0.2125 -0.1875 -1.0075 -1.2225 -0.1425  0.7325 1.6275 1.3975  
4 mal_rna_10_rRNA  0.0150 -0.1850 -1.0450 -0.3550  0.2950 -0.0150 0.3850 0.3050  
5 mal_rna_11_rRNA  0.1200 -0.0900 -0.9100 -0.6500  0.0900 -0.2700 0.9100 1.1200  
6 mal_rna_14_rRNA  0.0200 -0.0200 -0.8400 -0.6600  0.1700 -0.0900 0.6200 0.0800 

I can apply smooth.spline on each row independently and it looks good with spline() so far (I want 48 points. I'll figure out later how to do it with smoooth.spline spar):

> time <- c(0,6,12,18,24,30,36,42)  
> plot(time, mUnique[1, 2:9])  
> smooth <- smooth.spline(time, mUnique[1, 2:9])  
> lines(smooth, col="blue")  
> splin <-spline(time, mUnique[1, 2:9], n=48)  
> lines(splin, col="blue")  

My question is I suppose basic, but how to I apply smooth.spline() or spline() to the whole dataframe, and get back a matrix 4565 * 49 where I have the coordinates for each knots of the smoothed spline? I don't really care about plotting that data.

I tried:

> smooth <- smooth.spline(time, mUnique[, 2:9]|factor(ID))

Now, don't know what to do. Is that a matter of making loops?

Thank you in advance

share|improve this question
    
What is it you want to do? Do you just want to get the equivalent of applying smooth.spline on each row of your data frame (columns 2-9), without having to do it by hand? Can you clarify or confirm if that is the case? –  Gavin Simpson Mar 29 '11 at 10:40
    
I'll add to the comment above - you mention that you want the knots, but that isn't what you are getting with either of the smooth.spline or spline calls. It appears you want the fitted responses or the y data for the fitted spline? If that is the case, it is reasonably easy. –  Gavin Simpson Mar 29 '11 at 11:23
    
@Gavin I want to apply smooth.spline() to each 4565 rows and get from that a new matrix that would have the new 48 y values for each 4565 rows. I apologize for being unclear. Indeed, I do not want the curve for each rows but its y coordinates for each 48 fitted x values. –  Olivier Mar 29 '11 at 11:45
    
OK, assumed as much and have been beavering away on an extended example. See below... –  Gavin Simpson Mar 29 '11 at 11:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is this what you're looking for?

time <- c(0,6,12,18,24,30,36,42)

t(
  apply(mUnique[-1],1,
    function(x){
      tmp <- smooth.spline(time,x)
      predict(tmp,seq(min(time),max(time),length.out=49))$y
    }
  )
)

It should give you the matrix as you described.

Extra explanation :

I drop the first column (mUnique[-1]). This is the list way of doing it, you can also do mUnique[,-1], which is the matrix equivalent. Both work for dataframes.

Then I tell apply to apply the function over the rows, which is the first margin.

The function I define,

function(x){
        tmp <- smooth.spline(time,x)
        predict(tmp,seq(min(time),max(time),length.out=49))$y
    }

is a two-liner :

  • I calculate the smooth spline
  • I calculate the predictions for a regular sequence of 49 points (seq(min(time),max(time),length.out=49)), and take the y values of that prediction.

The x in this function definition is the argument that is passed. In this case it represents one row that is passed by the apply function.

Finally, I transpose the matrix (t) to get it in the format you requested.

The code runs perfectly with the following testcase :

mUnique <- read.table(textConnection("
         ID      h0      h6     h12     h18     h24     h30    h36    h42
     mal_mito_1  0.1800 -0.0400 -0.8600 -0.7300  0.0400 -0.1400 1.4400 1.4900
     mal_mito_2 -0.0250 -0.3050 -1.1050 -1.2150  0.0250  1.2750 1.7950 1.3850
     mal_mito_3  0.2125 -0.1875 -1.0075 -1.2225 -0.1425  0.7325 1.6275 1.3975
mal_rna_10_rRNA  0.0150 -0.1850 -1.0450 -0.3550  0.2950 -0.0150 0.3850 0.3050
mal_rna_11_rRNA  0.1200 -0.0900 -0.9100 -0.6500  0.0900 -0.2700 0.9100 1.1200
mal_rna_14_rRNA  0.0200 -0.0200 -0.8400 -0.6600  0.1700 -0.0900 0.6200 0.0800 ")
,header=T)

time <- c(0,6,12,18,24,30,36,42)

Make sure you define time before running my code...

share|improve this answer
    
@Joris; OK so you remove the first row and column, margin of 1 and apply function(x) that is the smooth.spline stored in tmp? I don't understand the use predict() and $y though (I did require(utils) first). What is x in your formula? I copied and paste your formula and get the following error. Error in t(apply(mUnique[-1], 1, function(x) { : error in evaluating the argument 'x' in selecting a method for function 't' –  Olivier Mar 29 '11 at 11:58
    
@Olivier smooth.spline() works (by default) on a set of knots arranged evenly over the interval of the x variable (time in your case). It returns the unique x-locations and the fitted spline values for the response. In your case, these would be vectors of length = 8 because that is how long time is. So what @Joris and I have done is fit the spline, then predict from this spline at a set of new locations spread over the range of time. The $y bit selects just the fitted values from the prediction - we don't need the 48 evenly spaced time points $x returned by predict(). –  Gavin Simpson Mar 29 '11 at 12:08
    
+1 now you've added some explanation ;-) –  Gavin Simpson Mar 29 '11 at 12:13
    
@Olivier : updated with explanation –  Joris Meys Mar 29 '11 at 12:17
    
@Gavin Thank you for the explanation. That makes more sense now –  Olivier Mar 29 '11 at 14:39

Using your snippet of data in object dat, we can do what (I think) you want. First we write a little wrapper function that fits a smoothing spline via smooth.spline(), and then predicts the response from this spline for a set of n locations. You ask for n = 48 so we'll use that as the default.

Here is one such wrapper function:

SSpline <- function(x, y, n = 48, ...) {
    ## fit the spline to x, and y
    mod <- smooth.spline(x, y, ...)
    ## predict from mod for n points over range of x
    pred.dat <- seq(from = min(x), to = max(x), length.out = n)
    ## predict
    preds <- predict(mod, x = pred.dat)
    ## return
    preds
}

We check this works for the first row of your data:

> res <- SSpline(time, dat[1, 2:9])
> res
$x
 [1]  0.000000  0.893617  1.787234  2.680851  3.574468  4.468085  5.361702
 [8]  6.255319  7.148936  8.042553  8.936170  9.829787 10.723404 11.617021
[15] 12.510638 13.404255 14.297872 15.191489 16.085106 16.978723 17.872340
[22] 18.765957 19.659574 20.553191 21.446809 22.340426 23.234043 24.127660
[29] 25.021277 25.914894 26.808511 27.702128 28.595745 29.489362 30.382979
[36] 31.276596 32.170213 33.063830 33.957447 34.851064 35.744681 36.638298
[43] 37.531915 38.425532 39.319149 40.212766 41.106383 42.000000

$y
 [1]  0.052349585  0.001126837 -0.049851737 -0.100341294 -0.150096991
 [6] -0.198873984 -0.246427429 -0.292510695 -0.336721159 -0.378381377
[11] -0.416785932 -0.451229405 -0.481006377 -0.505411429 -0.523759816
[16] -0.535714043 -0.541224748 -0.540251293 -0.532753040 -0.518689349
[21] -0.498019582 -0.470750611 -0.437182514 -0.397727107 -0.352796426
[26] -0.302802508 -0.248157388 -0.189272880 -0.126447574 -0.059682959
[31]  0.011067616  0.085850805  0.164713260  0.247701633  0.334851537
[36]  0.425833795  0.519879613  0.616194020  0.713982047  0.812448724
[41]  0.910799082  1.008296769  1.104781306  1.200419068  1.295380186
[46]  1.389834788  1.483953003  1.577904960

> plot(time, dat[1, 2:9])
> lines(res, col = "blue")

which gives:

plot of fitted spline

That seems to work, so now we can apply the function over the set of data, keep only the $y component of the object returned by SSpline(). For that we use apply():

> res2 <- apply(dat[, 2:9], 1,
+               function(y, x, ...) { SSpline(x, y, ...)$y },
+               x = time)
> head(res2)
                1           2           3           4           5           6
[1,]  0.052349585 -0.02500000  0.21250000 -0.06117869 -0.02153366 -0.02295792
[2,]  0.001126837 -0.04293509  0.17175460 -0.10994988 -0.06538250 -0.06191095
[3,] -0.049851737 -0.06407856  0.12846458 -0.15838412 -0.10899505 -0.10074427
[4,] -0.100341294 -0.09168227  0.08005550 -0.20614476 -0.15213426 -0.13933920
[5,] -0.150096991 -0.12899810  0.02395291 -0.25289514 -0.19456304 -0.17757705
[6,] -0.198873984 -0.17927793 -0.04241763 -0.29829862 -0.23604434 -0.21533911

Now res2 contains 48 rows and 6 columns, the 6 columns refer to each row of dat used here. If you want it the other way round, just transpose res2: t(res2).

We can see what has been done via a simple matplot() call:

> matplot(x = seq(min(time), max(time), length = 48), 
+         y = res2, type = "l")

which produces:

fitted splines

share|improve this answer
    
That is perfect Gavin. Exactly what I was looking for! And I thought it would be easy... That helps me a lot to move along now! I got it to work just fine on the whole dataframe. I just had to omit the rows with NA. Thank you so much. I really appreciate that. –  Olivier Mar 29 '11 at 14:36
    
+1 for the wrapper function and the graphs –  Joris Meys Mar 29 '11 at 15:28

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