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To move the branch pointer of a checked out branch, one can use the git reset --hard command. But how to move the branch pointer of a not-checked out branch to point at a different commit (keeping all other stuff like tracked remote branch)?

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3  
Sounds like all you wanted to do is a branch from a different commit than the one it is created from now. If my understanding is correct, then why don't you simply create a new branch from the commit you want to create it from using git branch <branch-name> <SHA-1-of-the-commit> and dump the old branch? –  yasouser Mar 29 '11 at 20:31
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@yasouser - I am not sure whatever dumping "master" branch is a good idea. –  Bulwersator Mar 24 '13 at 11:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 70 down vote accepted

You can do it for arbitrary refs. This is how to move a branch pointer:

git update-ref -m "reset: Reset <branch> to <new commit>" refs/heads/<branch> <commit>

The general form:

git update-ref -m "reset: Reset <branch> to <new commit>" <ref> <commit>

You can pick nits about the reflog message if you like - I believe the branch -f one is different from the reset --hard one, and this isn't exactly either of them.

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Seeing as It's been 6 months and Jefromi hasn't turned his/her comment into an answer, I'm doing it as community wiki so it gets exposure. I personally didn't see it until I had done a branch -f! –  Adam A Nov 21 '11 at 2:06
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Where is the message good for? Where is it stored and how to read it later? –  Mot Mar 21 '12 at 12:05
    
@PhoneixS thanks for the edit. @MikeL - probably shows up in the reflog? (try git reflog to see it) –  Adam A Jul 1 '12 at 0:39
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NOTE: This does not work on bare repositories. On bare repositories, you have to use 'git branch -f master <commit>' to update the branch (see the answer below). –  Hach-Que Sep 30 '12 at 10:13
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If, like me, you accidentally use <branch> instead of refs/heads/<branch>, you'll end up with a new file in your .git directory at .git/<branch>, and you'll get messages like "refname 'master' is ambiguous" when you try to work with it. You can delete the file from your .git directory to fix. –  David Minor Jun 6 '13 at 18:02
git branch -f branch-name new-tip-commit
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Or for arbitrary refs, git update-ref -m "reset: Reset <branch> to <new commit>" <branch> <commit>. (You can pick nits about the reflog message if you like - I believe the branch -f one is different from the reset --hard one, and this isn't exactly either of them.) –  Jefromi Mar 29 '11 at 14:18
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Jefromi, please write a separate answer so you can get votes. :) –  Mot Mar 29 '11 at 17:09
    
@MikeL. You can also upvote comments... –  Pelle ten Cate May 5 '11 at 20:24
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@pelle-ten-cate But you can't accept them! –  Duncan Parkes Sep 8 '11 at 20:36
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This is a better answer since it handles the 99% case and actually conforms to the documentation. git help branch says " -f, --force Reset <branchname> to <startpoint> if <branchname> exists already. Without -f git branch refuses to change an existing branch." –  AlexChaffee Dec 5 '12 at 18:22

You can also pass git reset --hard a commit reference.

For example:

git checkout branch-name
git reset --hard new-tip-commit

I find I do something like this semi-frequently:

Assuming this history

$ git log --decorate --oneline --graph
* 3daed46 (HEAD, master) New thing I shouldn't have committed to master
* a0d9687 This is the commit that I actually want to be master

# Backup my latest commit to a wip branch
$ git branch wip_doing_stuff

# Ditch that commit on this branch
$ git reset --hard HEAD^

# Now my changes are in a new branch
$ git log --decorate --oneline --graph
* 3daed46 (wip_doing_stuff) New thing I shouldn't have committed to master
* a0d9687 (HEAD, master) This is the commit that I actually want to be master
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Finally one that worked! –  Hubro Apr 5 at 14:58
    
This makes the most sense in that typically one uses HEAD or HEAD^ to move the branch tip back in time. So this is consistent to specify the commit ahead. –  justingordon Apr 6 at 7:41
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This is fine if your working tree is clean. If you have lots of staged or unstaged changes, it's probably better to do git update-ref as discussed above. –  a paid nerd Apr 8 at 4:35

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