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Given the class layout (Base->Derived; Base->Derived2), and the fact that I hold the instance to the derived classes as base class pointer (Base* baseder2 = new Derived2), I'd like to be able to instantiate the TemplClass instance with the derived type (something like sh = new TemplClass<Derived2>(baseder2)). The code below instantiates sh = new TemplClass<Base>(baseder2), which leads to compile error due to the fact that the fn function is not declared in class Base. How can I find out the derived type of baseder2 pointer, preferably without dynamic_cast? Real life code has lots of Base descendants, so I'd like to avoid if statements with dynamic_cast. I was looking into boost::type_traits, but don't what to do with that, to be honest. Template function template <typename T> BaseTemplClass* foo(T* t) is just lame excuse for factory obj.

best regards, dodol

class Base
{
public:
  virtual ~Base(){}
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
  virtual ~Derived(){}
  void function()
  {
    std::cout<<"This is Derived"<<std::endl;
  }
};

class Derived2 : public Base
{
public:
  virtual ~Derived2(){}
   void function()
  {
    std::cout<<"This is Derived2"<<std::endl;
  }
};

class BaseTemplClass
{
public:
  virtual void Print() =0;
};

template <class Tmodel>
class TemplClass : public BaseTemplClass
{
public:
  TemplClass(Tmodel* m)
  {
    model = m;
  }
  void Print()
  {
    model->function();
    std::cout << " TemplClass"<<typeid(model).name() << std::endl;
  }
  Tmodel *model;
};

template <typename T> BaseTemplClass* foo(T* t)
{
  BaseTemplClass* sh;
  std::cout << "FOO: "<<typeid(t).name() << std::endl;
  sh = new TemplClass<T>(t);
  return sh;
}


int main(int argc, char **argv) 
{
    Derived* der = new Derived;
    Derived2* der2 = new Derived2;
    Base* baseder2 = new Derived2;

    BaseTemplClass* sh = foo(der);
    sh->Print();
    delete sh;

    sh = foo(der2);
    sh->Print();
    delete sh;


    sh = foo(baseder2);
    sh->Print();
    delete sh;

    delete der;
    delete der2;
    delete baseder2;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
I realize now that my question didn't make any sense. I do need template class, and these functions really have to be non virtual. I needed the factory method. One way to accomplish this would be to put description string/enum/whatever in Base and initialize it derived classes. Then one could initialize templ. class in factory obj based on that desc. I thought that I could avoid that if I could deduce the pointer type. As Space_C0wb0y said, this is not possible. Thanx for your time, and please accept my appologies for askin question in really bad way. cheers –  dodol Mar 29 '11 at 19:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is template class really needed in your situation? In the given example you may add method "function" to the base class, and make it virtual.

But if you still need template classes, following is possible:

class Base
{
public:
  virtual ~Base(){}
  virtual BaseTemplClass* createTemplClass() = 0;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
  virtual ~Derived(){}
  void function()
  {
    std::cout<<"This is Derived"<<std::endl;
  }
  virtual BaseTemplClass* createTemplClass()
  {
    return new TemplClass<Derived>( this );
  }
};

class Derived2 : public Base
{
public:
  virtual ~Derived2(){}
  void function()
  {
    std::cout<<"This is Derived2"<<std::endl;
  }
  virtual BaseTemplClass* createTemplClass()
  {
    return new TemplClass<Derived2>( this );
  }
};


template <typename T> BaseTemplClass* foo(Base* t)
{
  BaseTemplClass* sh;
  std::cout << "FOO: "<<typeid(t).name() << std::endl;
  sh = t->createTemplClass();
  return sh;
}
share|improve this answer
    
In his case, he does not even need C++. Some C code with structs and function pointers will do perfectly. –  ali_bahoo Mar 29 '11 at 14:10

Would it make more sense to make function abstract in Base so that you don't need to know which derived class it is?

share|improve this answer
    
that's the thing. I can't. I'd like to avoid virtual functions in Base's subclasses due to performance issues –  dodol Mar 29 '11 at 13:20
2  
@dodol: What you are doing right here is called premature optimization. Please use virtual functions. –  ali_bahoo Mar 29 '11 at 13:37

This is not possible. Template parameter types have to be determined at compile time, but the actual type of a pointer can only be determined at run time.

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