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I have 5 bits and so 32 different combinations (of them).

Starting from

00000

and ending with

11111

Is there some way of quickly listing all possibilities? I could do it by hand, but I worry that I might miss one. I'm guessing some clever chap has written some algorithm and/or made a website, that can do this very easily. At least I hope so.

Thanks a lot.

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Which programming language are you using? –  Doc Brown Mar 29 '11 at 13:02
    
It's actually PHP. There's five possible fail points in a form, so I thought I'd just pass the error as an integer, and then convert it to binary, and output the error message depending on which "bits" were flagged. It might be a really bad way to do what I want to do, but it sound efficient :-) –  Chuck Mar 29 '11 at 13:06
1  
@Django - you'd be better off doing bitwise operations to determine which flags were set infernodevelopment.com/bitwise-and-flags –  Ryan Emerle Mar 29 '11 at 13:11
1  
It might be efficient but "premature optimization is the root of all evil". First make the code easy to read and then, if necessary, optimize. –  Jonas Elfström Mar 29 '11 at 13:17
    
@Ryan, thanks for that. –  Chuck Mar 29 '11 at 13:19

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In Ruby:

0b0000.upto(0b1111) {|n| puts n.to_s(2).rjust(4,"0")}
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
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This turned out to be the simplest solution. I just went to TryRuby.org and then typed in: 0b00000.upto(0b11111){|n| puts n.to_s(2).rjust(5,"0")} –  Chuck Mar 29 '11 at 13:23

Unix:

echo {0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1} | xargs -n 1
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for (int i = 0; i <31; i++) cout << ((i & 16) >> 4) << ((i & 8) >> 3) << ((i & 4) >> 2) << ((i & 2) >> 1) << (i & 1) << endl;

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Just count from 0 to 31 and output the digit in it's binary form.

Something like this should do:

public static String zeroPad(String str) {
    return "00000".substring(str.length()) + str;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
        System.out.printf("%s%n", zeroPad(Integer.toBinaryString(i)));
}

Output:

00000
00001
00010
00011
...
11110
11111
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Sure this will print out strings of length 5? –  Doc Brown Mar 29 '11 at 13:04
    
No, you would have to pad with zeros. –  aioobe Mar 29 '11 at 13:05
    
.. from 0 to 31 .. –  Ryan Emerle Mar 29 '11 at 13:06
    
Thanks. Updated. –  aioobe Mar 29 '11 at 13:09

This will put them all on the command line on Linux.

echo {0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}

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2  
Beautiful answer. Append | tr ' ' '\n' to get each number on a separate line. –  aioobe Mar 29 '11 at 13:10
    
If I had I access to Linux, this is undoubtedly what I would have done. –  Chuck Mar 29 '11 at 13:25

Write a column with integer from 0 to 31, then write a second column with the binary equivalent of each integer side-by-side.

That way you will increase your chance not to miss a combination.

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