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Is it possible to undo the changes caused by the following:

git reset --hard HEAD~1
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If you had it pushed to another repo, then you might be able to get it back. (I use hg, so terminology might be wrong). –  Matthew Schinckel Aug 8 '08 at 6:36
    
I have written a complete guide to recovering any lost commit with git. It even has illustrations :-) [Check it out][fixLink] [fixLink]: programblings.com/2008/06/07/… –  webmat Sep 16 '08 at 17:13
2  
--hard discards uncommitted changes. Since these aren't tracked by git, there's no way to restore them through git. –  Josh Aug 8 '13 at 22:22

9 Answers 9

up vote 628 down vote accepted

Pat Notz is correct. You can get the commit back so long as it's been within a few days. git only garbage collects after about a month or so unless you explicitly tell it to remove newer blobs.

$ git init
Initialized empty Git repository in .git/

$ echo "testing reset" > file1
$ git add file1
$ git commit -m 'added file1'
Created initial commit 1a75c1d: added file1
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 file1

$ echo "added new file" > file2
$ git add file2
$ git commit -m 'added file2'
Created commit f6e5064: added file2
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 file2

$ git reset --hard HEAD^
HEAD is now at 1a75c1d... added file1

$ cat file2
cat: file2: No such file or directory

$ git reflog
1a75c1d... HEAD@{0}: reset --hard HEAD^: updating HEAD
f6e5064... HEAD@{1}: commit: added file2

$ git reset --hard f6e5064
HEAD is now at f6e5064... added file2

$ cat file2
added new file

You can see in the example that the file2 was removed as a result of the hard reset, but was put back in place when I reset via the reflog.

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91  
You can use "git reset --hard HEAD@{1}", no need for using SHA1. In most cases it should be enough to use "git reset --hard ORIG_HEAD". –  Jakub Narębski May 21 '09 at 6:17
14  
git log -g can be a little bit nicer way to view the reflog than git reflog. –  Dan Moulding Oct 28 '10 at 13:09
19  
There's one very important caveat with this.. and thats the "--hard" part. --hard blows away your local uncommitted changes. And you cant get them back like this (as they've not been committed anywhere). I believe there is nothing you can do about that :( –  Michael Anderson Aug 4 '11 at 5:05

What you want to do is to specify the sha1 of the commit you want to restore to. You can get the sha1 by examining the reflog (git reflog) and then doing

git reset --hard <sha1 of desired commit>

But don't wait too long... after a few weeks git will eventually see that commit as unreferenced and delete all the blobs.

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It is possible to recover it if Git hasn't garbage collected yet.

Get an overview of dangling commits with fsck:

$ git fsck --lost-found
dangling commit b72e67a9bb3f1fc1b64528bcce031af4f0d6fcbf

Recover the dangling commit with rebase:

$ git rebase b72e67a9bb3f1fc1b64528bcce031af4f0d6fcbf
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The answer is hidden in the detailed response above, you can simply do:

$> git reset --hard HEAD@{1}

(See the output of git reflog show)

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If you have not yet garbage collected your repository (e.g. using git repack -d or git gc, but note that garbage collection can also happen automatically), then your commit is still there – it's just no longer reachable through the HEAD.

You can try to find your commit by looking through the output of git fsck --lost-found.

Newer versions of Git have something called the "reflog", which is a log of all changes that are made to the refs (as opposed to changes that are made to the repository contents). So, for example, every time you switch your HEAD (i.e. every time you do a git checkout to switch branches) that will be logged. And, of course, your git reset also manipulated the HEAD, so it was also logged. You can access older states of your refs in a similar way that you can access older states of your repository, by using an @ sign instead of a ~, like git reset HEAD@{1}.

It took me a while to understand what the difference is between HEAD@{1} and HEAD~1, so here is a little explanation:

git init
git commit --allow-empty -mOne
git commit --allow-empty -mTwo
git checkout -b anotherbranch
git commit --allow-empty -mThree
git checkout master # This changes the HEAD, but not the repository contents
git show HEAD~1 # => One
git show HEAD@{1} # => Three
git reflog

So, HEAD~1 means "go to the commit before the commit that HEAD currently points at", while HEAD@{1} means "go to the commit that HEAD pointed at before it pointed at where it currently points at".

That will easily allow you to find your lost commit and recover it.

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2  
Another explanation that I think would be clearer: HEAD~1 means go to "parent of HEAD," while HEAD@{1} go to "go back one step in HEAD's history" –  kizzx2 Jul 22 '09 at 17:30
1  
The problem is that the term "history" is really overloaded in VCSs. Yet another way to express is would be that ~ goes backwards in commit history, whereas @ goes backwards in chronological or temporal history. But none of the three versions is particularly good. –  Jörg W Mittag Jul 22 '09 at 22:02
    
@kizzx2 (and Jorg) actually those 3 explanations, when taken together, help a lot - thx –  Richard Le Mesurier May 12 at 10:32

If you're really lucky, like I was, you can go back into your text editor and hit 'undo'.

I know that's not really a proper answer, but it saved me half a day's work so hopefully it'll do the same for someone else!

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1  
This is actually a very good tip, saved me a lot of times ;) And its way simpler than doing anything in git... –  severin May 21 '12 at 15:30
1  
and thank you of all goodness gracious in this entire world. thank you. thank you. thank you. –  Trip Aug 14 '12 at 18:12
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This is the only way to recover unstaged changes in files after the hard reset. Saved me too ;) –  Czarek Tomczak May 30 '13 at 20:33

Example of IRL case:

$ git fsck --lost-found

Checking object directories: 100% (256/256), done.
Checking objects: 100% (3/3), done.
dangling blob 025cab9725ccc00fbd7202da543f556c146cb119
dangling blob 84e9af799c2f5f08fb50874e5be7fb5cb7aa7c1b
dangling blob 85f4d1a289e094012819d9732f017c7805ee85b4
dangling blob 8f654d1cd425da7389d12c17dd2d88d318496d98
dangling blob 9183b84bbd292dcc238ca546dab896e073432933
dangling blob 1448ee51d0ea16f259371b32a557b60f908d15ee
dangling blob 95372cef6148d980ab1d7539ee6fbb44f5e87e22
dangling blob 9b3bf9fb1ee82c6d6d5ec9149e38fe53d4151fbd
dangling blob 2b21002ca449a9e30dbb87e535fbd4e65bac18f7
dangling blob 2fff2f8e4ea6408ac84a8560477aa00583002e66
dangling blob 333e76340b59a944456b4befd0e007c2e23ab37b
dangling blob b87163c8def315d40721e592f15c2192a33816bb
dangling blob c22aafb90358f6bf22577d1ae077ad89d9eea0a7
dangling blob c6ef78dd64c886e9c9895e2fc4556e69e4fbb133
dangling blob 4a71f9ff8262701171d42559a283c751fea6a201
dangling blob 6b762d368f44ddd441e5b8eae6a7b611335b49a2
dangling blob 724d23914b48443b19eada79c3eb1813c3c67fed
dangling blob 749ffc9a412e7584245af5106e78167b9480a27b
dangling commit f6ce1a403399772d4146d306d5763f3f5715cb5a    <- it's this one

$ git show f6ce1a403399772d4146d306d5763f3f5715cb5a

commit f6ce1a403399772d4146d306d5763f3f5715cb5a
Author: Stian Gudmundsen Høiland <stian@Stians-Mac-mini.local>
Date:   Wed Aug 15 08:41:30 2012 +0200

    *MY COMMIT MESSAGE IS DISPLAYED HERE*

diff --git a/Some.file b/Some.file
new file mode 100644
index 0000000..15baeba
--- /dev/null
+++ b/Some.file
*THE WHOLE COMMIT IS DISPLAYED HERE*

$ git rebase f6ce1a403399772d4146d306d5763f3f5715cb5a

First, rewinding head to replay your work on top of it...
Fast-forwarded master to f6ce1a403399772d4146d306d5763f3f5715cb5a.
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I know this is an old thread... but as many people are searching for ways to undo stuff in Git, I still think it may be a good idea to continue giving tips here.

When you do a "git add" or move anything from the top left to the bottom left in git gui the content of the file is stored in a blob and the file content is possible to recover from that blob.

So it is possible to recover a file even if it was not committed but it has to have been added.

git init  
echo hello >> test.txt  
git add test.txt  

Now the blob is created but it is referenced by the index so it will no be listed with git fsck until we reset. So we reset...

git reset --hard  
git fsck  

you will get a dangling blob ce013625030ba8dba906f756967f9e9ca394464a

git show ce01362  

will give you the file content "hello" back

To find unreferenced commits I found a tip somewhere suggesting this.

gitk --all $(git log -g --pretty=format:%h)  

I have it as a tool in git gui and it is very handy.

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+1. As mentioned in stackoverflow.com/a/21350689/6309, git fsck --lost-found can help. –  VonC Jan 27 at 9:05
    
YOu saved my life........... –  Manan Shah Mar 10 at 15:11
    
thanks buddddddy.......... –  Manan Shah Mar 10 at 15:11
    
awesome dude..... –  Manan Shah Mar 10 at 15:17

Made a tiny script to make it slightly easier to find the commit one is looking for:

git fsck --lost-found | grep commit | cut -d ' ' -f 3 | xargs -i git show \{\} | egrep '^commit |Date:'

Yes, it can be made considerably prettier with awk or something like it, but it's simple and I just needed it. Might save someone else 30 seconds.

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