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This is the sample xml file:

<sample s="false">
  <assertionResult>
    <name>XML Assertion</name>
    <failure>false</failure>
    <error>false</error>
  </assertionResult>
  <assertionResult>
    <name>Error Assertion</name>
    <failure>false</failure>
    <error>false</error>
  </assertionResult>
  <assertionResult>
    <name>Success Assertion</name>
    <failure>false</failure>
    <error>false</error>
  </assertionResult>
  <assertionResult>
    <name>XML Schema Assertion</name>
    <failure>false</failure>
    <error>true</error>
  </assertionResult>
</sample>

The original file consists of sample nodes such as the one above. I need to count all sample nodes with the s="false" attribute, except those which have an <error>true</error> inside. This is the code which I am using for counting:

select="count(/testResults/*[attribute::s='false'])"

The problem is that I don't know how to exclude nodes which have the child with the "true" value.

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what XSLT processor are you using? Curious because I've only seen XPath syntax like @s='false' used until now. attribute::s='false' surprised me. –  Naraen Mar 29 '11 at 13:43
1  
@Nareen - '@' is a shorthand for the attribute axis –  Nic Gibson Mar 29 '11 at 13:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can list several sets of square brackets to add new clauses to your condition i.e.

/testResults/*[@s='false'][not(.//error = 'true')]

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1  
+1 correct answer. BTW [conditionA][conditionB] is equivalent to [conditionA and conditionB]... Some people find the latter more readable. –  LarsH Mar 29 '11 at 14:41
1  
@LarsH: $node-set[$bool1][$bool2] is not quite the same as [$bool1 and $bool2] because in the former case [$bool2] will be evaluated for each instance of the already filtered node set $node-set[$bool1], but in later case both expression $bool1 and $bool2 will be evaluated for each instance of the whole node set $node-set. That's why $node-set[.='something' and position()=1] is not the same as $node-set[.='something'][1]. –  user357812 Mar 29 '11 at 16:19
    
@Alej: good point that in the case of position() (explicit or implicit), the rule doesn't hold. I can never remember the details of the rules for position(). –  LarsH Mar 29 '11 at 16:52

select="count(/testResults/*[attribute::s='false' and not(error='false')])"

share|improve this answer
    
This puts the test for the error element at the wrong level (and says 'false' instead of 'true'). Try and not(.//error = 'true') –  LarsH Mar 29 '11 at 14:42

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