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There are a few ways to include jQuery and jQuery UI and I'm wondering what people are using?

  • Google JSAPI
  • jQuery's site
  • your own site/server
  • another CDN

I have recently been using Google JSAPI, but have found that it takes a long time to setup an SSL connection or even only to resolve google.com. I have been using the following for Google:

<script src="https://www.google.com/jsapi"></script>
<script>
google.load('jquery', '1.3.1');
</script>

I like the idea of using Google so it's cached when visiting other sites and to save bandwidth from our server, but if it keeps being the slow portion of the site, I may change the include.

What do you use? Have you had any issues?

Edit: Just visited jQuery's site and they use the following method:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3/jquery.min.js"></script>

Edit2: Here's how I've been including jQuery without any problems for the last year:

<script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.3/jquery.min.js"></script>

The difference is the removal of http:. By removing this, you don't need to worry about switching between http and https.

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6  
Darryl, great edit. Might I suggest you move your edit up to the top of the page and change the src to the simpler/safer/faster syntax you use now? Your answer has become basically canonical and both changes would help people get what they came for quickly. –  Josh Smith Aug 12 '10 at 23:28
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14 Answers

up vote 99 down vote accepted

Without a doubt I choose to have JQuery served by Google API servers. I didn't go with the jsapi method since I don't leverage any other Google API's, however if that ever changed then I would consider it...

First: The Google api servers are distributed across the world instead of my single server location: Closer servers usually means faster response times for the visitor.

Second: Many people choose to have JQuery hosted on Google, so when a visitor comes to my site they may already have the JQuery script in their local cache. Pre-cached content usually means faster load times for the visitor.

Third: My web hosting company charges me for the bandwidth used. No sense consuming 18k per user session if the visitor can get the same file elsewhere.

I understand that I place a portion of trust on Google to serve the correct script file, and to be online and available. Up to this point I haven't been disappointed with using Google and will continue this configuration until it makes sense not to.

One thing worth pointing out... If you have a mixture of secure and insecure pages on your site you might want to dynamically change the Google source to avoid the usual warning you see when loading insecure content in a secure page:

Here's what I came up with:

<script type="text/javascript">
    document.write([
        "\<script src='",
        ("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://" : "http://",
        "ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.2.6/jquery.min.js' type='text/javascript'>\<\/script>" 
    ].join(''));
</script>

UPDATE 9/8/2010 - Some suggestions have been made to reduce the complexity of the code by removing the HTTP and HTTPS and simply use the following syntax:

<script type="text/javascript">
    document.write("\<script src='//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.2.6/jquery.min.js' type='text/javascript'>\<\/script>");
</script>

In addition you could also change the url to reflect the jQuery major number if you wanted to make sure that the latest Major version of the jQuery libraries were loaded:

<script type="text/javascript">
    document.write("\<script src='//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1/jquery.min.js' type='text/javascript'>\<\/script>");
</script>

Finally, if you don't want to use Google and would prefer jQuery you could use the following source path (keep in mind that jQuery doesn't support SSL connections):

<script type="text/javascript">
    document.write("\<script src='http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.min.js' type='text/javascript'>\<\/script>");
</script>
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16  
I agree with all three of your reasons which is why I include jquery from Google on my production sites. Instead of the the js dynamic injection for SSL pages I just reference url in a script tag without the protocol specified. Seems to work fine for me. <script src="//ajax.google..."></script> –  Aaron Wagner Feb 13 '09 at 23:59
1  
Interesting idea... But if you're going to use DNS poisoning to hijack the JQuery load why not just hijack the the whole site request? Or how about the Google Analytics script? –  Dscoduc Feb 16 '09 at 8:04
9  
I also agree with everything, except to simplify things, I use the this format: <script src="//ajax.google..."></script>. Then I don't need to worry about http or https. Thxs Aaron Wagner for that. –  Darryl Hein Jun 19 '09 at 15:18
1  
Dscoduc: I think your answer deserves an update with Aaron and Darryl's simplification. Their version is quite simply easier to read, quicker to load, and safer. And this page seems to have become one of the canonical answers for including jQuery from Google. –  Josh Smith Aug 12 '10 at 23:26
8  
I don't see what document.write() is being used? a simple <script src="..."></script> is fine to place in the header. →@Dscoduc:← it's not going to be quicker, it's just going to take that warning message away. If your site is using secure https and you're pulling from an non-encoded content (eg http://googleapis) then you'll get that warning message. What will be a little quicker if you're only using http but you're linking to https://googleapis, there's a little overhead with the "secure" encoding. Thus, linking to http://googleapis would be a little faster. –  vol7ron Nov 6 '10 at 19:07
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One reason you might want to host on an external server is to work around the browser limitations of concurent connections to particular server.

However, given that the jQuery file you are using will likely not change very often, the browser cache will kick in and make that point moot for the most part.

Second reason to host it on external server is to lower the traffic to your own server.

However, given the size of jQuery, chances are it will be a small part of your traffic. You should probably try to optimize your actual content.

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2  
+1 for the concurrent connections part. –  bendewey Feb 13 '09 at 20:10
1  
another reason- odds are users already have jquery from google in their cache, so they might not even need to download it the first time they visit your site. –  Kip Feb 13 '09 at 20:13
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jQuery 1.3.1 min is only 18k in size. I don't think that's too much of a hit to ask on the initial page load. It'll be cached after that. As a result, I host it myself.

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4  
I respectfully disagree, based on your stated reason. If you get a lot of traffic then the 18k per session can quickly add up to a sizable amount of traffic. Especially if your web hosting charges by the bandwidth used... –  Dscoduc Feb 13 '09 at 20:22
1  
My view is that is only of a concern if your visitors only look at one page. If your profile is fewer visitors & multiple page-views, then minimal overhead when spread across page-views per visitor. Ditto for returning visitors. –  Kristen Mar 2 '09 at 13:46
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If you want to use Google, the direct link may be more responsive. Each library has the path listed for the direct file. This is the jQuery path

<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

Just reread your question, is there a reason your are using https? This is the script tag Google lists in their example

<script src="http://www.google.com/jsapi"></script>
<script>
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2  
Using HTTPS because the site is HTTPS, so kinda have to. –  Darryl Hein Feb 13 '09 at 20:06
1  
All your content is https based, or only some of it? –  Dscoduc Feb 13 '09 at 20:26
2  
http links on https sites are annoying because IE (at least by default) bugs you with annoying "This site contains a mixture of secure and insecure content." confirmation boxes. –  cletus Feb 13 '09 at 21:56
1  
The site where the code came from is completely SSL--extremely secure contact information. –  Darryl Hein Feb 13 '09 at 22:07
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Pros: Host on Google has benefits

  • Probably faster (their servers are more optimised)
  • They handle the caching correctly - 1 year (we struggle to be allowed to make the changes to get the headers right on our servers)
  • Users who have already had a link to the Google-hosted version on another domain already have the file in their cache

Cons:

  • Some browsers may see it as XSS cross-domain and disallow the file.
  • Particularly users running the NoScript plugin for Firefox

I wonder if you can INCLUDE from Google, and then check the presence of some Global variable, or somesuch, and if absence load from your server?

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2  
It is Firefox's cons, not Google's ,.) –  Nakilon May 3 '13 at 8:53
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In addition to people who advices to host it on own server, I'd proposed to keep it on separate domain (e.g. static.website.com) to allow browsers to load it into separate from other content thread. This tip also works for all static stuff, say images and css.

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There are a few issues here. Firstly, the async load method you specified:

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://www.google.com/jsapi"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
  google.load('jquery', '1.3.1');
  google.setOnLoadCallback(function() {
    // do stuff
  });
</script>

has a couple of issues. Script tags pause the page load while they are retrieved (if necessary). Now if they're slow to load this is bad but jQuery is small. The real problem with the above method is that because the jquery.js load happens independently for many pages, they will finish loading and render before jquery has loaded so any jquery styling you do will be a visible change for the user.

The other way is:

<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

Try some simple examples like, have a simple table and change the background of the cells to yellow with the setOnLoadCallback() method vs $(document).ready() with a static jquery.min.js load. The second method will have no noticeable flicker. The first will. Personally I think that's not a good user experience.

As an example run this:

<html>
<head>
  <title>Layout</title>
  <style type="text/css">
    .odd { background-color: yellow; }
  </style>
</head>
<body>
<table>
  <tr><th>One</th><th>Two</th></tr>
  <tr><td>Three</td><td>Four</td></tr>
  <tr><td>Five</td><td>Six</td></tr>
  <tr><td>Seven</td><td>Nine</td></tr>
  <tr><td>Nine</td><td>Ten</td></tr>
</table> 
<script src="http://www.google.com/jsapi"></script>
<script>
  google.load("jquery", "1.3.1");
  google.setOnLoadCallback(function() {
    $(function() {
      $("tr:odd").addClass("odd");
    });
  });
</script>
</body>
</html>

You (should) see the table appear and then the rows go yellow.

The second problem with the google.load() method is that it only hosts a limited range of files. This is a problem for jquery since it is extremely plug-in dependent. If you try and include a jquery plugin with a <script src="..."> tag and google.load() the plug-in will probably fail with messages of "jQuery is not defined" because it hasn't loaded yet. I don't really see a way around this.

The third problem (with either method) is that they are one external load. Assuming you have some plugins and your own Javascript code you're up to a minimum of two external requests to load your Javascript. You're probably better off getting jquery, all relevant plug-ins and your own code and putting it into one minified file.

From Should You Use Google's Ajax Libraries API for Hosting?:

As to load times, you're actually loading two scripts - the jsapi script and the mootools script (the compressed version from above). So that is two connections, rather than one. In my experience, I found that the load time was actually 2-3 times slower than loading from my own personal shared server, even though it was coming from Google, and my version of the compressed file was a couple of K larger than Google's. This, even after the file had loaded and (presumably) cached. So for me, since the bandwidth doesn't matter much, isn't going to matter.

Lastly you have the potential problem of a paranoid browser flagging the request as some sort of XSS attempt. It's not typically a problem with default settings but on corporate networks where the user may not have control over which browser they use let alone the security settings you may have a problem.

So in the end I can't really see me using the Google AJAX API for jQuery at least (the more "complete" APIs are a different story in some ways) much except to post examples here.

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I haven't experienced any of the issues you mention. Just loading things in the right order will solve pretty much everything as far as i understand. –  Darryl Hein Feb 13 '09 at 22:45
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I wouldn't want any public site that I developed to depend on any external site, and thus, I'd host jQuery myself.

Are you willing to have an outage on your site when the other (Google, jquery.com, etc.) goes down? Less dependencies is the key.

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8  
If Google doesn't work, the internet is probably down :P –  Darryl Hein Feb 13 '09 at 23:36
2  
I put user experience (fast load times) right up there with less dependencies. –  Dscoduc Feb 14 '09 at 3:10
    
@slacy hey your site is down! actually jk, but i did notice you're using google analytics and have their script at the beginning instead of the end - which will slow your site down fractionally if google IS being slow –  Simon_Weaver Feb 16 '09 at 7:30
2  
hmm...slacy is using Google Analytics? Didn't he just say that he wouldn't want any public site that he developed to depend on an external site? ;-) –  Dscoduc Feb 16 '09 at 8:06
1  
Wow, dudes, some harsh comments there. :) Yes, I do use Analytics on my personal blog, but that's not a production site that generates revenue, so I think it's really just fine. I'm sure my site is down for many days per year. Remember, what you do for personal sites and for work aren't the same –  slacy Feb 17 '09 at 5:50
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I have to vote -1 for the libraries hosted on Google. They are collecting data, google analytics style, with their wrappers around these libraries. At a minimum, I don't want a client browser doing more than I'm asking it to do, much less anything else on the page. At worse, this is Google's "new version" of not being evil -- using unobtrusive javascript to gather more usage data.

Note: if they've changed this practice, super. But the last time I considered using their hosted libraries, I monitored the outbound http traffic on my site, and the periodic calls out to google servers were not something I expected to see.

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But are you already running Google Analytics on your site? Since I am I don't suppose it makes much difference whether the JQuery comes from Google or not, they probably already know I am running it on my site... –  Dscoduc Feb 13 '09 at 20:33
    
But its Cached for 1 year - are we even sending a 304 "File changed" to Google in the meantime? –  Kristen Feb 13 '09 at 20:37
    
Yeah, I've seen those periodic calls back to Google as well (Safari's activity manager has a nice list). –  Darryl Hein Feb 13 '09 at 20:48
    
Dscoduc - yep, using Analytics. At least with that implementation, I understood ahead of time that I was giving up usage data. Not so with the JS libs. –  jro Feb 16 '09 at 15:04
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Here some useful resource, hope can help you to chose your CDN. MS has recently add a new domain for delivery Libraries trough their CDN.

Old Format: http://ajax.microsoft.com/ajax/jQuery/jquery-1.5.1.js New Format: http://ajax.aspnetcdn.com/ajax/jQuery/jquery-1.5.1.js

This should not send all cookies for microsoft.com. http://www.asp.net/ajaxlibrary/cdn.ashx#Using_jQuery_from_the_CDN_11

Here some statistics about most popular technology used on the web across all technology. http://trends.builtwith.com/

Hope can help you to choose.

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I just include the latest version from the jQuery site: http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.pack.js It suits my needs and I never have to worry about updating.

EDIT:For a major web app, certainly control it; download it and serve it yourself. But for my personal site, I could not care less. Things don't magically disappear, they are usually deprecated first. I keep up with it enough to know what to change for future releases.

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1  
i was found that method to be kinda dangerous, what if a code change in the library breaks your site? or the jquery site goes down? i'd rather have complete control over the file. –  Jason Miesionczek Feb 13 '09 at 19:49
    
Yup. Better to keep control over your codebase. –  bigmattyh Feb 13 '09 at 19:51
1  
Also, I hate to hit the jQuery folks' bandwidth like this. They already provide a really cool free tool, and I'd hate for them to go down because of bandwidth costs. Better to use Google as your external source if you don't want to host it yourself, since they are providing it for that purpose. –  nezroy Feb 13 '09 at 20:01
    
see edit for comment responses. –  geowa4 Feb 13 '09 at 20:11
    
I would recommend switching over to use Google instead of JQuery. The main reason is that Google would likely have many more servers around the world than JQuery and from my experience more people use Google hosting which increases your chance they already have it cached. –  Dscoduc Feb 13 '09 at 20:25
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I might be old-school about this, but I still frown on hotlinking. Maybe Google is the exception, but in general, it's really just good manners to host the files on your own server.

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2  
What do you mean by "good manners?" Google encourages you to link to their server. It's pumped out by Google's incredible infrastructure. –  Nosredna Feb 13 '09 at 20:40
1  
there is definitely a confusion at first when you hear about using google. but as nosredna said it is encouraged "We take the pain out of hosting the libraries, correctly setting cache headers, staying up to date with the most recent bug fixes, etc." - code.google.com/apis/ajaxlibs –  Simon_Weaver Feb 16 '09 at 7:25
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If I am responsible for the 'live' site I better be aware of everything that is going on and into my site. For that reason I host the jquery-min version myself either on the same server or a static/external server but either way a location where only I (or my program/proxy) can update the library after having verified/tested every change

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I would hope that Google will never change the file - for bug-fixes they will host a new file, with different version number in filename. Or am I being naive? will they rollout "Minor fixes" using the same filename?? –  Kristen Feb 13 '09 at 21:54
    
Google should never change the file if you ask for a specific version. –  Darryl Hein Feb 13 '09 at 22:20
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In head:

  (function() {
    var jsapi = document.createElement('script'); jsapi.type = 'text/javascript'; jsapi.async = true;
    jsapi.src = ('https:' == document.location.protocol ? 'https://' : 'http://') + 'www.google.com/jsapi?key=YOUR KEY';
    (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0]).appendChild(jsapi);
  })();

End of Body:

<script type="text/javascript">
google.load("jquery", "version");
</script>
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