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I'm letting the user to do painting in my app.The app will show some options on the screen once the whole screen is painted.

I'm thinking to keep an array of screen pixel eg. pixel = new int[width][height]; and mark it whenever the pixel is painted, but I guess this is a bad solution to my problem.

Is there a way to detect if the user has painted the whole screen?

@Override
public boolean onTouchEvent(MotionEvent ev) {
    switch (ev.getAction()) {
    case MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN: {
        X = (int) ev.getX();
        Y = (int) ev.getY();
        break;
    }
    case MotionEvent.ACTION_MOVE: {
        X = (int) ev.getX();
        Y = (int) ev.getY();
        break;
    }
    return true;
}
@Override
public void onDraw(Canvas canvas) {
    super.onDraw(canvas); 
    canvas.drawCircle(X, Y, 50, paint);
}
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Instead of an array, what about a counter? Pixel++ for each pixel flipped and then check when it hits the upper limit. –  DA. Mar 29 '11 at 14:16
    
The user might paint at the same location thus making the pixel++ method invalid –  SteD Mar 29 '11 at 14:28
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can't think of anything else than using an array to keep track of the pixels' state. A 2D array however is slower than using 2 parallel 1D arrays. But what about putting all pixels in one single array and when painted, remove it's element from the array? Instead of looping through the whole array, you could simply check the array length to be 0.

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I think your approach (keeping a matrix) is probably the correct one, but if the size of the brush is a lot larger than 1 pixel, it might make sense to keep a lower-resolution matrix: you probably don't need pixel-precise accuracy. Yes, this way you might let the user get away with not filling all the pixels onscreen, but it would take a lot less memory.

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The answer may be to create a Bitmap. All paints occur in the bitmap and are blitted to the canvas to keep it in sync.

The check is done from a timer and a background thread that periodically calls Bitmap.copyPixelsToBuffer to copy the data into an IntBuffer. Then you can walk the buffer one pixel (an int32) at a time. If all the pixels are the same value you know the screen is filled and you can do what you like in response.

A more efficient implementation might use the user's drawing as a trigger for the background timer and restrict itself to the union of the bounds that the user drew into since the last check rather than checking the whole screen again.

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