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I have this irritating problem, and I can't find the answer for it. For a reason my integers are binary, instead of decimal.

It's just this little part and when I print my integer I get: 0 4 8 12 16 ...

The code I use:

    int *iInt=0;
for (Books *booktitles in appDelegate.book_sos.books ) {
    iInt =(int*)iInt + 1;
    NSLog(@"AAAAAAA%d",iInt);

}

I tried it with NSNumber, NSInteger .

Does someone knows where I could be wrong? Thanks in advance!

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possible duplicate of Objective C: How does 7 - 1 = 3? –  Caleb Mar 29 '11 at 14:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Lose the asterisk from your declaration of iInt, and don't cast to int*. The asterisk means that the variable is a pointer to the given type, and when you increment a pointer it increases by the size of the pointer, or 4 bytes in this case. Your code should look like this:

int iInt=0;
for (Books *booktitles in appDelegate.book_sos.books ) {
    iInt =(int)iInt + 1;
    NSLog(@"AAAAAAA%d",iInt);

}

See Objective-C: How does 7-1=3? for another version of the same question.

Note that this is a basic C question; it has nothing to do with Xcode or Objective-C. You'd get a similar result with any C compiler on any platform.

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You are creating a pointer TO AN int, not an int. Don't do that.

int iInt=0;
for (Books *booktitles in appDelegate.book_sos.books ) {
    iInt = iInt + 1;
    NSLog(@"AAAAAAA%d",iInt);
}
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