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I am using a stored procedure to insert data into a database, when it is inserted it is automatically given a ID that is an identity, it also the Primary Key of the table. I also need to insert data into a second table of which that ID is one of the columns that needs to be inserted. But it the ID hasnt been created yet, so I was wondering how would you guys go about solving this problem. I need it so when they submit my form that it inserts the user, and then I need to add it to a table that basically will document that user being created. Is this possible.? I am using Microsoft SQL Server 2005.

Thanks

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What RDBMS are you using? –  Joe Stefanelli Mar 29 '11 at 15:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
INSERT INTO Table1 (SomeColumn) Values ('SomeValue')

DECLARE @NewIdent int
SELECT @NewIdent = SCOPE_IDENTITY()

INSERT INTO Table2 (SomeColumn, T1ID) VALUES ('SomeValue',@NewIDent)

You can look at what @@IDENTITY, SCOPE_IDENTITY(), and IDENT_CURRENT to see which one will fit your needs best. I suspect SCOPE_IDENTITY will do the job.

Here is a good article on what they all do.

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Use the output clause to get the id from the first insert and use that value inthe second insert.

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U can get new identity inserted using SCOPE_IDENTITY()

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Examine the result of the scope_identity() system function after the first insert; it will contain the ID of the previously-inserted record (assuming the ID is auto-generated using an identity column). As stated in the comments, it is better than using @@identity because @@identity can be inaccurate or cause problems when triggers are present in the database or in high-traffic situations where queries can be pre-empted.

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@@identity has serious issues when triggers are present, and possibly in high usage systems where queries are prone to interrupting each other. –  Jody Mar 29 '11 at 15:36
    
I give; answer edited. Personally I avoid triggers, as they contain business logic that is much easier to develop, test and maintain up in the application layer. But, they are still useful, and in such a case you guys are right. –  KeithS Mar 29 '11 at 21:33

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