Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building a settings manager for my http server. I want to be able to change settings without having to kill the whole process. One of the settings I would like to be able to change is change the port number, and I've come up with a variety of solutions:

  • Kill the process and restart it
  • Call server.close() and then do the first approach
  • Call server.close() and initialize a new server in the same process

The problem is, I'm not sure what the repercussions of each approach is. I know that the first will work, but I'd really like to accomplish these things:

  • Respond to existing requests without accepting new ones
  • Maintain data in memory on the new server
  • Lose as little uptime as possible

Is there any way to get everything I want? The API for server.close() gives me hope: server.close(): Stops the server from accepting new connections.

My server will only be accessible by clients I create and by a very limited number of clients connecting through a browser, so I will be able to notify them of a port change. I understand that changing ports is generally a bad idea, but I want to allow for the edge-case where it is convenient or possibly necessary.

P.S. I'm using connect if that changes anything.

P.P.S. Relatively unrelated, but what would change if I were to use UNIX server sockets or change the host name? This might be a more relevant use-case.

P.P.P.S. This code illustrates the problem of using server.close(). None of the previous servers are killed, but more are created with access to the same resources...

var http = require("http");

var server = false,
    curPort = 8888;

function OnRequest(req,res){
    res.end("You are on port " + curPort);
    CreateServer(curPort + 1);
}
function CreateServer(port){
    if(server){
        server.close();
        server = false;
    }
    curPort = port;
    server = http.createServer(OnRequest);
    server.listen(curPort);
}
CreateServer(curPort);

Resources:

http://nodejs.org/docs/v0.4.4/api/http.html#server.close

share|improve this question
    
It seems that browsers can access any port that they have been able to access since the node process started. For example, I loaded the page in chrome, and it worked on port 8888, then I loaded it in FireFox on port 8888 and it didn't work, but the new port did. –  tjameson Mar 29 '11 at 17:50
    
Curl doesn't exhibit this behavior and killing the browser seemed to disable access to 'old' ports. Does this mean that the request is never actually ended until the browser clears it's cache? –  tjameson Mar 29 '11 at 17:52

3 Answers 3

I tested the close() function. It seems to do absolute nothing. The server still accepts connections on his port. restarting the process was the only way for me.

I used the following code:

var http = require("http");

var server = false;
function OnRequest(req,res){    
    res.end("server now listens on port "+8889);
    CreateServer(8889);
}
function CreateServer(port){
    if(server){
        server.close();
        server = false;
    }
    server = http.createServer(OnRequest);
    server.listen(port);
}
CreateServer(8888);
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm... that could lead to some issues. Does that mean that when you do server = false that the server object isn't garbage collected? I modified the code some to further show this problem. –  tjameson Mar 29 '11 at 16:19
    
+1 because it illustrates a point. –  tjameson Mar 29 '11 at 16:21

What about using cluster?

http://learnboost.github.com/cluster/docs/reload.html

It looks interesting!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the link, It looks quite useful. The problem here is that it will kill the whole server, right? I'd like to keep data in memory if possible (say I'm streaming a bunch of files to a a bunch of clients), because IO is quite costly. –  tjameson Mar 29 '11 at 16:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I was about to file an issue on the node github page when I decided to test my code thoroughly to see if it really is a bug (I hate filing bug reports when it's user error). I realized that the problem only manifests itself in the browser, because apparently browsers do some weird kind of HTTP request keep alive thing where it can still access dead ports because there's still a connection with the server.

What I've learned is this:

  • Browser caches keep ports alive unless the process on the server is killed
  • Utilities that do not keep caches by default (curl, wget, etc) work as expected
  • HTTP requests in node also don't keep the same type of cache that browsers do

For example, I used this code to prove that node http clients don't have access to old ports:

Client-side code:

var http = require('http'),
    client,
    request;

function createClient (port) {
  client = http.createClient(port, 'localhost');

  request = client.request('GET', '/create');
  request.end();

  request.on('response', function (response) {
      response.on('end', function () {
          console.log("Request ended on port " + port);
          setTimeout(function () {
              createClient(port);
          }, 5000);
      });
  });
}

createClient(8888);

And server-side code:

var http = require("http");

var server,
    curPort = 8888;

function CreateServer(port){
    if(server){
        server.close();
        server = undefined;
    }

    curPort = port;

    server = http.createServer(function (req, res) {
        res.end("You are on port " + curPort);
        if (req.url === "/create") {
            CreateServer(curPort);
        }
    });
    server.listen(curPort);
    console.log("Server listening on port " + curPort);
}
CreateServer(curPort);

Thanks everyone for the responses.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll check back in two days and if I think someone else's answer is more thorough and useful to people with a similar problem, I'll go ahead and accept that one. –  tjameson Mar 29 '11 at 18:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.