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I have an issue with deserializing an object. I get an error 'System.Int32' cannot be converted to type 'System.Decimal'. This object has many child objects and since this object has been serialized, a new version of the object has one or many fields that have been changed from int to decimal and now I can't deserialize the object because it doesn't match my original object.

I have tried using the OnDeserializing method but the context parameter doesn't help me out at all.

Is there a way around this? I've found some examples online but it doesn't really apply to my situation. I would just like to know if there is a way to view my serialized object even if my object has now changed or if there is a way to find out which variable needs to be changed to decimal and how to go about doing it.

Thanks

Hi Joel,
I've added your code but I'm not quite sure how to call it from my code. Here's what I've got:

public static Application LoadSnapshot(int appID, int statusID)
{  
  ApplicationSnapshotCollection AppSnap = new ApplicationSnapshotCollection();
  AppSnap.LoadByAppAndSnapshotStatusID(appID, statusID);
  Application app = null;

  try
  {
    if (AppSnap.Count > 0)
    {
      if (AppSnap[0].Snapshot != null)
      {
        BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter();
        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream((byte[])AppSnap[0].Snapshot);
        ms.Position = 0;
        app = (Application)bf.Deserialize(ms);

        ms.Close();

        return app;
      }
      return null;
    }

    return null;

  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    Dfait.Diagnostics.LogWriter.CriticalError(ex);
    return null;
  }

}

[OnDeserializing]
void OnDeserializing(StreamingContext context)
{
  //What do I put here?


}

protected Application(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context) 
{
  SerializationInfoEnumerator e = info.GetEnumerator();     
  Console.WriteLine("Values in the SerializationInfo:");     
  while (e.MoveNext())     
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Name={0}, ObjectType={1}, Value={2}", e.Name, e.ObjectType,   e.Value);     
  } 
}  
void ISerializable.GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context) 
{  

} 

How do I go about calling the constructor with the proper parameters in my scenario?

share|improve this question
    
How was it modified when serialized? –  m.edmondson Mar 29 '11 at 16:01
1  
Are you looking for a solution to your current problem, or suggestions as to how to avoid similar problems in the future? –  Jon Skeet Mar 29 '11 at 16:02
    
I'm using the BinaryFormatter to Serialize...Here's how I do it: BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter(); MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(); bf.Serialize(ms, app); pc["@appID"].Value = app.appID; pc["@App"].Value = ms.ToArray(); pc["@statusID"].Value = statusID; ms.Close(); ...and then I store it in the database. –  rvenable Mar 29 '11 at 17:22
    
Looking for a solution to my current problem. –  rvenable Mar 29 '11 at 17:27
    
You implement an interface by putting it in the class declaration, so your class would be defined as: public class Application : ISerializable if it already inherits from a base class, put the interface after the base class, separated by a comma: public Application : ApplicationBase, ISerializable Once your class implements ISerializable, the binary formatter will look for the constructor matching that signature when it deserializes your object, so you should be able to set a break point and debug your current code. –  Joel C Mar 30 '11 at 18:38

1 Answer 1

You said you've tried using the OnDeserializing method, and it sounds like you were able to access the StreamingContext, so it sounds like you're stepping through in the Vistual Studio debugger and you have access to the source code. You can implement the ISerializable interface on your class, which will give you more control over the deserialization process. There are 2 pieces to implementing the ISerializable interface, the first is to add a constructor that takes a SerializationInfo and a StreamingContext as arguments. From there, you can iterate through the serialized properties on your class by calling the GetEnumerator method on the SerializationInfo instance.

The 2nd part to implementing ISerializable is to define the method void ISerializable.GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context). In your case, you don't need to do anything beyond defining it to keep the compiler from complaining.

Edit: I've added the class declaration in my code example to show adding the ISerializable interface.

public class Application : ApplicationBase, ISerializable
{
    protected Application(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {
        SerializationInfoEnumerator e = info.GetEnumerator();
        Console.WriteLine("Values in the SerializationInfo:");
        while (e.MoveNext())
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Name={0}, ObjectType={1}, Value={2}", e.Name, e.ObjectType, e.Value);
        }
    }

    void ISerializable.GetObjectData(SerializationInfo info, StreamingContext context)
    {

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Joel, My constructor never seems to get called. I added your code (see my original post...I added code to it) and it fails on the line "app = (Application)bf.Deserialize(ms);". It does step into the OnDeserializing method but I'm not sure if I still need it. I have access to the context in this method but I don't have access to SerializationInfo. Am I doing anything wrong? –  rvenable Apr 4 '11 at 19:39
    
You shouldn't still need the [OnDeserializing] method. In fact, it may interfere with the ISerializable implementation, my understanding is that you should use one or the other. The deserialization constructor should have already been called by the time it reaches OnDeserializing. –  Joel C Apr 4 '11 at 20:50
    
I've removed the OnDeserializing method and it still doesn't go through the constructor...just goes from this line "app = (Application)bf.Deserialize(ms);" right to my Exception handling??? –  rvenable Apr 5 '11 at 17:48

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