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Basically, I've created a helper method for a Validation object I'm using. The code is like so:

public class ValidationSet<TSource> : ValidationSet
{
    public void AddValidationErrorFor<TProperty>(Expression<Func<TSource, TProperty>> propertyLambda, string errorMessage, string data = null)
    {
        // extension method
        PropertyInfo property = propertyLambda.GetPropertyInfo();

        Add(new ValidationItem
        {
            Key = property.Name,
            Message = errorMessage,
            DataMessage = data
        });
    }
}

public class ValidationSet : List<ValidationItem>
{
    public void AddValidationError(string key, string errorMessage)
    {
        Add(new ValidationItem
        {
            Key = key,
            Message = errorMessage
        });
    }
}

Effectively, what happens (and this works), is that I can write something like this:

public class SomeObject
{
     public int Id { get; set; }
     public string SomeValue { get; set; }
}

And then when I want to validate it, I can write something like this:

ValidationSet<SomeObject> validationSet = new ValidationSet<SomeObject>();

if(SomeValue.Contains("SomeOtherValue"))
    validationSet.AddValidatorErrorFor(x => x.SomeValue, "Some Error");

This all currently compiles. However, I don't get intellisense for my lambda expression in the last line. I have to manually type x.SomeValue, even though it all compiles fine. Does anyone know what is missing to get the intellisense?

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I’ve just run into this bug as well, but found out that it’s not the nullable parameter but just any parameter after the lambda expression that causes IntelliSense to stop working. I’ve filed a bug so maybe something happens here. –  poke Jun 5 '13 at 14:57
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I reproduced your setup like so...

public class ValidateThing<TSource>
{
    public void AddValidation<TProperty>(Expression<Func<TSource, TProperty>> expr)
    {
        //...
    }
}

public static class Tester
{
    public static void Test()
    {
        ValidateThing<string> v = new ValidateThing<string>();

        v.AddValidation(s => s.Length);
    }
}

As soon as I typed the s. after s =>, I got intellisense for the members of String. Does this code snippet produce the same behavior as your code?

EDIT: Oh, I suppose it's relevant to ask what version of Visual Studio you're using.

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Let me open a quick console app and see... –  Tejs Mar 29 '11 at 17:20
    
That gives me intellisense. Odd, that this works and mine doesnt... –  Tejs Mar 29 '11 at 17:21
1  
Bingo, found out why there is a problem. The nullable parameter is somehow jacking with the intellisense. As soon as I take that off the signature, it all works as expected. An odd bug, to say the least. Marking this answer as accepted. –  Tejs Mar 29 '11 at 17:28
    
@Tejs That's very interesting. +1 so people notice your response with that. Thanks for the answer! –  Shibumi Mar 29 '11 at 22:35
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IntelliSense in the IDE doesn't have 1-1 parity with code that compiles. It has to bind expressions based on partially typed structures and hence incomplete information. This is not always possible to do.

One area which is particularly difficult is IDE inference of lambda expressions (particularly expression trees). This is likely just a case the IDE doesn't handle well for intellisense

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While possible, how is this different than MVC Html Helper extensions? The source object type is already known, and it has intellisense just fine. AKA HtmlHelper<TController> is similar to ValidationSource<TSource> for my purposes. –  Tejs Mar 29 '11 at 16:31
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