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Surprisingly, I can't find an answer to that by googling and searching SO (there are lots of similar questions on SO but related to other languages).

I suspect that the answer is no. If so, there is an obvious inconvenience, e.g.

try
{
  std::string fname = constructFileName(); // can throw MyException
  ofstream f;
  f.exceptions(ofstream::failbit | ofstream::badbit);
  f.open(fname.c_str());
  // ...
}
catch (ofstream::failure &e)
{
  cout << "opening file " << fname << " failed\n"; // fname is not in the scope
}
catch (MyException &e)
{
  cout << "constructing file name failed\n";
}

If my assumption is correct, how do you deal with this? By moving the std::string fname; out of try, I guess?

I understand that a scope is defined by a {} block, but this seems as a reasonable case for, hmm, exception. Is the reason for that that objects can be not fully constructed if an exception is thrown?

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2  
Right on the spot. If in try { A a; B b; } the constructor for A throws, neither a nor b can reasonably be in scope. –  larsmans Mar 29 '11 at 17:29
1  
Aside from anything else, the compiler likely doesn't know whether constructFileName() can throw ofstream::failure. If fname is still in scope in the first catch block, think about when it's going to be destructed - after the catch executes, but conditionally on where the throw came from. Yuck. You could try to tell the compiler what each function throws, but I don't much fancy objects having a lifetime and scope that depends on the exception-specification of constructFileName(). Much cleaner to destroy everything created before the throw point, then deal with catch clauses. –  Steve Jessop Mar 29 '11 at 17:33
    
@larsmans, @Steve - thanks a lot, these should actually be answers as this what I was mainly looking for. Perhaps I should change the title from does to why doesn't –  davka Mar 29 '11 at 17:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Does catch block share the scope of the try block?

No.

How do you deal with this? By moving the std::string fname; out of try, I guess?

Yes.

I understand that a scope is defined by a {} block, but this seems as a reasonable case for, hmm, exception. Is the reason for that that objects can be not fully constructed if an exception is thrown?

The last thing C++ needs is more complex rules and exceptions to rules. :-)

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+1 from me for "The last thing C++ needs is more complex rules and exceptions to rules." –  Mark B Mar 29 '11 at 17:40
    
I must agree with your last sentence :) –  davka Mar 29 '11 at 17:41

While James' post correctly answers your questions, it doesn't supply the usual workaround: swap. Assuming constructFileName() returns std::string and not char const*, the following is idiomatic:

std::string fname;
try
{
    constructFileName().swap(fname); // can throw MyException
    std::ofstream f;
    f.exceptions(std::ios_base::failbit | std::ios_base::badbit);
    f.open(fname.c_str());
    // ...
}
catch (std::ios_base::failure &e)
{
    std::cout << "opening file " << fname << " failed\n";
}
catch (MyException &e)
{
    std::cout << "constructing file name failed\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. Why swap is better here than assignment? If an exception is thrown during assignment, does this leave the fname in an undefined state? –  davka Mar 30 '11 at 7:36
1  
@davka : With a pre-C++0x compiler, operator= would cause there to be two copies of the data during assignment, which is highly and completely unnecessarily inefficient, whereas with swap there will be at most one copy of the data. With a C++0x compiler it won't matter either way in this case, since the result of constructFileName would be an rvalue and consequently moved into fname (also ensuring there will be at most one copy of the data). In short: swap is much more efficient on all but cutting-edge compilers. –  ildjarn Mar 30 '11 at 18:37

There's an obvious reason: you cannot trust the state of the objects that were created inside the try block. The code there got interrupted by the exception, their constructors might not even have run yet.

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They are outside of the scope. This is because if u declare an object and try to initiate it, and the way you initiate it throws an exception, it will be caught.

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