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Okay, the title is really very subjective. But thats just what the problem is to me.

The background is that I want to distribute hits of static web contents evenly about a defined number of caching servers. Also the delivery to clients should speed up because several domains are in use and requests are not blocking each other. I also don't need a classic load balancer but generate the right links right away in my html code.

I also want to ensure that the same url always gets served by the same server.

So I just defined a little function that returns the host to use by hashing the request url and calculates the modulo by the number of servers in use:

function pseudocode_statify($url) { // $url looks like /folder1/folder2/file.jpg
 return 'http://' . md5($url) % $num_of_servers .'.mydomain.com' . $url;
}

I first had something like hex decoding and substring to prevent overflow in place, but found out that it just works fine the way above.

However my problem is that if I run the following test script:

for($i=0;$i<100000;$i++) {
  $md5 = md5(uniqid($i).microtime().rand(1,999999999999));
  $result[$md5%2]++;
}

I expected an even distribution. meaning that $result[0] would be near the value of $result[1];

This was not the case.

Okay, this is nothing special sofar. I would have just accepted the fact that md5 is not as evenly distributed as i thought and would have gone vor another hashing algorithm like sha1 or something.

But I tried to reproduce the findings and found a pattern that I cannot explain.

The ratio was always about 2/1. In fact it was the ratio was always something like 1/2.16 to 1/2.17

Sample output of some runs of the script above:

output was generated by: echo "ratio: ".$result[0]/$result[1]."\n";

ratio: 2.1757121534504
ratio: 2.1729411578062
ratio: 2.1726559360393
ratio: 2.1676895664225
ratio: 2.1667416128848
ratio: 2.1667115284133
ratio: 2.1677791605385
ratio: 2.1658969579688
ratio: 2.1668508131769
ratio: 2.1689292821741

Now the weird thing was that the ratio of sums % 2 equaling 1 and sums % 2 equaling 0 sometimes alternated!

for($j = 0; $j<100;$j++) {
    for($i=0;$i<100000;$i++) {
      $md5 = md5(uniqid($i).microtime().rand(1,999999999999));
      $result[$md5%2]++;
    }
var_dump($result);
}

I ran the script from the command line two sperate times and aborted it after 3 runs and it produced theese two outputs:

joe@joe-laptop:/home/flimmit/httpdocs$ php test.php
PHP Notice:  Undefined variable: result in /home/flimmit/httpdocs/test.php on line 6
PHP Notice:  Undefined offset: 0 in /home/flimmit/httpdocs/test.php on line 6
PHP Notice:  Undefined offset: 1 in /home/flimmit/httpdocs/test.php on line 6
array(2) {
  [0]=>
  int(68223)
  [1]=>
  int(31777)
}
array(2) {
  [0]=>
  int(136384)
  [1]=>
  int(63616)
}
array(2) {
  [0]=>
  int(204498)
  [1]=>
  int(95502)
}
^C
joe@joe-laptop:/home/flimmit/httpdocs$ php test.php
PHP Notice:  Undefined variable: result in /home/flimmit/httpdocs/test.php on line 6
PHP Notice:  Undefined offset: 1 in /home/flimmit/httpdocs/test.php on line 6
PHP Notice:  Undefined offset: 0 in /home/flimmit/httpdocs/test.php on line 6
array(2) {
  [1]=>
  int(31612)
  [0]=>
  int(68388)
}
array(2) {
  [1]=>
  int(63318)
  [0]=>
  int(136682)
}
array(2) {
  [1]=>
  int(94954)
  [0]=>
  int(205046)
}
^C
joe@joe-laptop:/home/flimmit/httpdocs$ 

As you can see in the first one the first entry of results is always higher, in the second one its the other way round. same script.

Strange thing is that i can ONLY reproduce this behaviour when i run the script several times.

I wrote this small script to reproduce the "swapping" and generate enough measure data:

for($j = 0; $j<100;$j++) {
  for($i=0;$i<rand(1000,10000);$i++) {
    $md5 = md5(uniqid($i).microtime().rand(1,99999999));
    $result[$md5%2]++;
    }
    #var_dump($result);
    echo "ratio: ".$result[0]/$result[1]." ".(($result[0]<$result[1]) ? "A":"B")."\n";
    sleep(rand(2,5));
}

But here It only prints b, never A's. Which made me think there might be a semantic error in the script, but i didnt find any.

I am really stuck and this bothers me a lot.

So my questions:

  • Can you recommend any literature / weblinks were i could read about md5 a little bit deeper including distributions etc

  • Can you explain / reproduce the behaviour? Do I have an error here? (in fact thats very likely but i cant find it)

  • Can you recommend any other algorithm that would besuitable for my use case? It needs not be cryptographic or strong but fast, deterministic and evenly distributed.

share|improve this question
1  
As a side note, if you want requests to be routed stably, you might want to look into consistent hashing. –  Nick Johnson Mar 29 '11 at 22:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The md5() function returns a string, not an integer.

Which means that this string will be type-casted to an integer to do the modulo ; and as this string will contain characters in the 0-9A-F range, casted to an integer, you have :

  • 1 chance out of 16 of getting a 0
  • 9 chances out of 16 of getting between 1 and 9
  • 6 chances out of 16 of getting between A and F -- which will be casted to a 0


For example, this :

$a = md5('plop1');
var_dump($a, (int)$a);

$a = md5('plop2');
var_dump($a, (int)$a);

$a = md5('plop5');
var_dump($a, (int)$a);

Will get you the following output :

string 'ac4bf0e466417336599b72a8b2f595da' (length=32)
int 0

string 'ed91c463402dd797d0718350f5bd0acd' (length=32)
int 0

string '85782b3afb04072c1bf172a6a7e6bb5e' (length=32)
int 85782

I'll let you guess the possible impact this can have on the result of the modulo operator ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
that sounds logical to me. i thought the error was somewhere on my side. trying to reproduce. –  The Surrican Mar 29 '11 at 18:03
    
fixed it by using hexdec(substr(md5($url),0,6))%$num works like a charm now :) thank you! –  The Surrican Mar 29 '11 at 18:16
    
Great ;-) You're welcome ; Glad I could help ! –  Pascal MARTIN Mar 29 '11 at 18:17
    
in fact i had it right int he first place but thought i could go better haha xD its so often the same :D –  The Surrican Mar 29 '11 at 18:18
1  
I think I'm going to have to star this question as a perfect example of the pathologies silent lossy type conversion can cause. –  Nick Johnson Mar 29 '11 at 22:51
for ($i = 0; $i < 10; $i++) {
    srand(crc32('test_url1'));
    echo rand().'<br />';
}
for ($i = 0; $i < 10; $i++) {
    srand(crc32('test_url2'));
    echo rand().'<br />';
}

add a range to the rand function and you have your server value.

share|improve this answer

"The background is that I want to distribute hits of static web contents evenly about a defined number of caching servers."

Many, many load balancers already do that. Squid, nginx, Varnish, HAProxy...

Please do not write your own load balancer in PHP. Please.

share|improve this answer
    
i don't want a load balancer, i want to address the correct server right away by printing the correct html output. the background however is also to speed up the delivery for the client because several domains are used and requests do not block each other. a load balancer wouldnt be of much use then. –  The Surrican Mar 30 '11 at 18:25

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