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In this code below

int main()
{
int  a = -1;
printf("%d",a>>1);
return 0;
}

Why it is giving output -1.

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1  
See this question shift operator in C. –  Mat Mar 29 '11 at 18:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

bit-shifting is defined only on unsigned types, for signed types it is implementation-defined. And this is a useful refinement by R..

Strictly speaking, it is defined for signed types whenever the value is positive and the result does not overflow, and right shift is implementation-defined for negative values. Left shift, on the other hand, is undefined for negative values

┌───┬──────────────┬──────────────────────────────────┬────────────────────────┐
│   │ Unsigned     │ Signed, positive                 │ Signed, negative       │
├───┼──────────────┼──────────────────────────────────┼────────────────────────┤
│<< │ well-defined │ well-defined, except on overflow │ undefined behaviour    │
│>> │ well-defined │ well-defined                     │ implementation-defined │
└───┴──────────────┴──────────────────────────────────┴────────────────────────┘
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4  
Strictly speaking, it is defined for signed types whenever the value is positive and the result does not overflow, and right shift is implementation-defined for negative values. Left shift, on the other hand, is undefined for negative values. –  R.. Mar 29 '11 at 18:07
1  
I believe that would be "implementation-defined" in C99 according to Wikipedia: Arithmetic shift –  Mat Mar 29 '11 at 18:11

Because -1 is 1111111...111 in binary. a>>1 operation will "sign extend" the sign bit, so you get 1111111...111 again.

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This is only in complementary code, which isn't necessarily the way numbers are represented. But still, on many platforms you are right –  Armen Tsirunyan Mar 29 '11 at 18:11
    
@Arment - Agreed, it is definitely machine dependent. I should have pointed that out. Clearly, though, sign extend is what is happening in this particular case. –  Joel Lee Mar 29 '11 at 18:12
    
@Armen - Don't know if you got previous comment. (Sorry, typo on your name.) –  Joel Lee Mar 29 '11 at 18:21

Most compilers choose to interpret >> on signed numbers to be arithmetic shift. Thus since the number is initially negative (i.e. the MSB bit is 1), after a right shift, that bit is replaced by another 1 to preserve the sign, ergo you end up with -1 as you started.

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The >> operator on a signed value may perform an arithmetic or logical shift, depending on the compiler. Arithmetic shifts retain the sign bit, so -1 (which on a 2-s complement machine, which these days is pretty much the only variety you will encounter) will remain -1 when right-shifted. (Note that the C standard explicitly does not specify whether >> on a signed number is an arithmetic or logical shift. It is always a logical shift on unsigned numbers, though.)

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The definition of bit-shifting on signed values is implementation-dependent. Check your compiler's docs for how it handles it.

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In Memory signed integer number stored as 2's complement if sign int and when data is read from memory {%d} it's converted into original form so here 2's complement of -1 will stored in memory let say integer take 2 byte so 2's complement of -1 is 1111 1111 1111 1111

After perform a>>1 It will change 0111 1111 1111 1111 now As we know that when data is read from memory it's again converted to 0 complement so take 2's complement of 0111 1111 1111 1111 It will be like 1000 0000 0000 0001 which is equal to -1

Note: 2's complement of +ve number is same as original binary representation 2's complement is only for -ve number. In C number always stored as 2's complement form

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1  
First, unsigned numbers are not stored as 2's complement. For signed numbers, not all architectures/compiler implementations use 2's complement too. C standard allows for any other number encoding although it's almost impossible to find a 1's complement or sign-magnitude implementation nowadays –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Dec 26 '13 at 6:06
    
@LưuVĩnhPhúc : why it's output coming -1 if unsigned is not stored as 2's complement #include <stdio.h> void main() { unsigned int a = -1; printf("%d", a); } –  Nishant Dec 26 '13 at 6:17
    
unsigned numbers are printed by %u, you're getting an undefined behavior –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Dec 26 '13 at 6:20
    
try printing -1 on computers that use 1's complement or sign-magnitude and see –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Dec 26 '13 at 6:21

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