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So, if I'm in my home directory and I want to move foo.c to ~/bar/baz/foo.c , but those directories don't exist, is there some way to have those directories automatically created, so that you would only have to type

mv foo.c ~/bar/baz/

and everything would work out? It seems like you could alias mv to a simple bash script that would check if those directories existed and if not would call mkdir and then mv, but I thought I'd check to see if anyone had a better idea.

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7 Answers 7

How about this one-liner (in bash):

mkdir -p ./some/path/; mv yourfile.txt $_

Breaking that down:

mkdir -p ./some/path

creates the directory (including all intermediate directories), after which:

mv yourfile.txt $_

moves the file to that directory ($_ expands to the last argument passed to the previous shell command, ie: the newly created directory).

I am not sure how far this will work in other shells, but it might give you some ideas about what to look for.

Here is an example using this technique:

$ > ls
$ > touch yourfile.txt
$ > ls
yourfile.txt
$ > mkdir -p ./some/path/; mv yourfile.txt $_
$ > ls -F
some/
$ > ls some/path/
yourfile.txt
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Nice with the '$_'. –  dmckee Feb 13 '09 at 22:23
    
Agreed, but this is a less general solution. My solution could serve as a mv substitude (thus an alias in bash) (assuming it works properly -- still untested!). –  strager Feb 13 '09 at 22:31
    
Why the obsession with redundant ./ everywhere? The args are not commands in PATH without the . directory... –  Jens Apr 27 '13 at 12:49
2  
Someone accept this answer FFS! –  professormeowingtons Jul 18 '13 at 23:02
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mkdir -p `dirname /full/path/to/file.txt`  
mv /full/path/the/file.txt  /destination/moved_file_name.txt
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+1 for not writting a wall of text for trivial things. I would have started with a "No:" :) –  OlivierBlanvillain Jan 20 at 10:55
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You can use mkdir:

mkdir -p ~/bar/baz/ && \
mv foo.c ~/bar/baz/

A simple script to do it automatically (untested):

#!/bin/sh

# Grab the last argument (argument number $#)    
eval LAST_ARG=\$$#

# Strip the filename (if it exists) from the destination, getting the directory
DIR_NAME=`echo $2 | sed -e 's_/[^/]*$__'`

# Move to the directory, making the directory if necessary
mkdir -p "$DIR_NAME" || exit
mv "$@"
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When I run "$ dirname ~?bar/baz/", I get "/home/dmckee/bar", which is not what yo want here... –  dmckee Feb 13 '09 at 21:33
    
@dmckee, Ah, you are right. Any idea on how to solve this? If you input ~/bar/baz you either (a) want to copy to ~/bar/ and rename to baz, or (b) copy to ~/bar/baz/. What's the better tool for the job? –  strager Feb 13 '09 at 21:38
    
You could use '[ -d "$2" ]' to sort it out, but that's not as pretty... –  dmckee Feb 13 '09 at 21:40
    
@dmckee, I've used regexp/sed to come up with a solution. Does it work to your liking? =] –  strager Feb 13 '09 at 21:42
    
Nice, except $2 is not the last argument unless $# = 2. I have a program, la, that prints its last argument. I used to use it in a version of the cp command (to add the current directory if the last argument wasn't a directory). Even modern shells support $1..$9 only; a Perl script may be better. –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 13 '09 at 21:44
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Save as a script named mv or mv.sh

#!/bin/bash
# mv.sh
for last; do true; done
if [[ ! -e $last ]]; then
  mkdir -p $last
fi
mv $@

Or put at the end of your ~/.bashrc file as a function that replaces the default mv on every new terminal. Using a function allows bash keep it memory, instead of having to read a script file every time.

function mv ()
{
  for last; do true; done
  if [[ ! -e $last ]]; then
    mkdir -p $last
  fi
  mv $@
}

These based on the submission of Chris Lutz.

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The following shell script, perhaps?

#!/bin/sh
if [[ -e $1 ]]
then
  if [[ ! -d $2 ]]
  then
    mkdir -p $2
  fi
fi
mv $1 $2

That's the basic part. You might want to add in a bit to check for arguments, and you may want the behavior to change if the destination exists, or the source directory exists, or doesn't exist (i.e. don't overwrite something that doesn't exist).

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With your code, the move isn't performed if the directory does not exist! –  strager Feb 13 '09 at 21:21
    
And you missed the "-p" flag to mkdir. –  dmckee Feb 13 '09 at 21:26
    
If a directory doesn't exist, why create it if you're just going to move it? (-p flag fixed) –  Chris Lutz Feb 13 '09 at 21:27
    
I mean, when you run the script and the directory $2 does not exist, it is created but the file is not copied. –  strager Feb 13 '09 at 21:30
    
he gave a simple construct and added information on how it should be expanded. Why vote it down?! –  ypnos Feb 13 '09 at 21:57
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You can even use brace extensions:

mkdir -p directory{1..3}/subdirectory{1..3}/subsubdirectory{1..2}      
  • which creates 3 directories (directory1, directory2, directory3),
    • and in each one of them two subdirectories (subdirectory1, subdirectory2),
      • and in each of them two subsubdirectories (subsubdirectory1 and subsubdirectory2).

You have to use bash 3.0 or newer.

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Interesting, but doesn't answer the OP's question. –  Alexey Feldgendler Nov 25 '12 at 21:37
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Sillier, but working way:

mkdir -p $2
rmdir $2
mv $1 $2

Make the directory with mkdir -p including a temporary directory that is shares the destination file name, then remove that file name directory with a simple rmdir, then move your file to its new destination. I think answer using dirname is probably the best though.

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