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I'd like to store the contents of a data structure, a few arrays, and a dozen or so variables in a file that can be saved and reloaded by my software as well as optionally edited in a text editor by a user reloaded. For the text editing, I need the data to be clearly labeled, like in a good ole .ini file:

AbsMaxVoltage = 17.5

There's a GUI, and one could argue that the user should just load and save and modify from the GUI, but the customer wants to be able to read and modify the data as text.

It's easy enough to write code to save it and reload it (assuming all the labels are in the same place and only the data has changed). With more work (or using some of the INI R/W code that's already out there I could pay attention to the label so if a line gets deleted or moved around the variables still get stuffed correctly, but both of these approaches seem pretty old-school. So I'm interested in how the brightest minds in programming would approach this today (using decade-old VB6 which I have to admit I still love).

Disclaimer: I'm an electrical engineer, not a programmer. This isn't my day job. Well maybe it's a few % of my day job.

Cheers!

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Ahhh. vb6 questions. ;)) +1 –  Kb. Feb 15 '09 at 21:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Lots of people will recommend XML to you. The problem is XML is still so trendy, some people use it everywhere without really thinking about it.

Like Jeff Atwood said, it's hard for non-programmers to read XML and particularly to edit it. There are too many rules, like escaping special characters and closing the tags in the correct order. Some experts recommend you treat XML as a binary format, not a text format at all.

I recommend using INI files, provided the maximum size limit of 32K is not a problem. I've never reached that limit in many similar situations in my own VB6. INI files are easy for ordinary folk to edit, and it's easy to read and write them from VB6. Just use some of the excellent drop-in code freely available on the web.

  • I'm sure the class Jay Riggs provided in his answer is excellent, because it's from VBAccelerator.
  • I would also recommend this class, because anything by Karl Peterson will be excellent too.

A couple of other points to think about:

  • Have you considered which directory to put the files into?
  • You mentioned "Unicode-friendly" in the question. INI files aren't Unicode, but that doesn't matter in practise. Unless you want to store characters that aren't supported on the current code page - like Chinese on an English computer - an unusual requirement, and one that will cause you other problems in a VB6 program anyway.
  • Legendary Windows guru Raymond Chen described the advantages of XML configuration files over INI files. Many of them rely on the XML file being read-only. The one legitimate advantage is if the data is highly structured - class heirarchies or the like. From your description that doesn't apply.
share|improve this answer
    
I mentioned "unicode-friendly" because our software is often used by customers in Asia and we sometimes see unexpected incompatibilities that usually boil down to unicode (len() function failing or reporting the wrong value, etc.). Thanks for the in-depth response. –  Fred Hamilton Feb 17 '09 at 10:29
    
Our software is used by customers in China - the INI files have been working fine. There are some gotchas in VB6 though. Michael Kaplan's book on Internationalization in VB6 is very useful, especially if you translate the user interface. see i18nwithvb.com –  MarkJ Feb 18 '09 at 21:31
    
I see you're based in the US. If you use characters from the range Chr$(128)-Chr$(255) in hard-coded strings or elsewhere, they'll give you problems in Asia. The characters from the range chr$(1) - chr$(127) are supported on all code pages. –  MarkJ Feb 19 '09 at 9:51

Consider using XML. It's completely standard, many text editors will highlight/manage it properly, every programming language and script language on Earth has good support for reading it, and it handles Unicode perfectly.

For simple name/value pairs as you suggest, it's quite readable. But you have the added advantage that if someday you need something more complex -- e.g. multi-lined values or a list of distinct values -- XML provides natural, easy ways of representing that.

P.S. Here's how to read XML in VB6.

share|improve this answer
    
Article is a little dated, reference Msxml3. –  AnthonyWJones Feb 13 '09 at 21:30
    
Yeah but the question is specifically for VB6 ! Since this is clearly a legacy system, I felt it was appropriate to link to a legacy answer! –  Jason Cohen Feb 13 '09 at 21:33
    
Msxml3 is hardly cutting edge ;) The article reference 2.6 which can actually lead to all sorts of wierdness. Referencing 3.0 is much cleaner and is present even on quite "legacy" platforms. –  AnthonyWJones Feb 13 '09 at 21:50
    
Cool, thanks much for the update! –  Jason Cohen Feb 13 '09 at 22:03
    
lol @claiming a reference for VB6 was a little dated –  annakata Feb 15 '09 at 21:06

Back in the olden days this class helped me use INI files with my VB6 programs:

VERSION 1.0 CLASS
BEGIN
  MultiUse = -1  'True
END
Attribute VB_Name = "cInifile"
Attribute VB_GlobalNameSpace = False
Attribute VB_Creatable = True
Attribute VB_PredeclaredId = False
Attribute VB_Exposed = False
Option Explicit
' =========================================================
' Class:    cIniFile
' Author:   Steve McMahon
' Date  :   21 Feb 1997
'
' A nice class wrapper around the INIFile functions
' Allows searching,deletion,modification and addition
' of Keys or Values.
'
' Updated 10 May 1998 for VB5.
'   * Added EnumerateAllSections method
'   * Added Load and Save form position methods
' =========================================================

Private m_sPath As String
Private m_sKey As String
Private m_sSection As String
Private m_sDefault As String
Private m_lLastReturnCode As Long

#If Win32 Then
    ' Profile String functions:
    Private Declare Function WritePrivateProfileString Lib "KERNEL32" Alias
     "WritePrivateProfileStringA" (ByVal lpApplicationName As String, ByVal
     lpKeyName As Any, ByVal lpString As Any, ByVal lpFileName As String) As
     Long
    Private Declare Function GetPrivateProfileString Lib "KERNEL32" Alias
     "GetPrivateProfileStringA" (ByVal lpApplicationName As Any, ByVal
     lpKeyName As Any, ByVal lpDefault As Any, ByVal lpReturnedString As
     String, ByVal nSize As Long, ByVal lpFileName As String) As Long
#Else
    ' Profile String functions:
    Private Declare Function WritePrivateProfileString Lib "Kernel" (ByVal
     lpApplicationName As String, ByVal lpKeyName As Any, ByVal lpString As
     Any, ByVal lpFileName As String) As Integer
    Private Declare Function GetPrivateProfileString Lib "Kernel" (ByVal
     lpApplicationName As String, ByVal lpKeyName As Any, ByVal lpDefault As
     Any, ByVal lpReturnedString As String, ByVal nSize As Integer, ByVal
     lpFileName As String) As Integer
#End If

Property Get LastReturnCode() As Long
    LastReturnCode = m_lLastReturnCode
End Property
Property Get Success() As Boolean
    Success = (m_lLastReturnCode <> 0)
End Property
Property Let Default(sDefault As String)
    m_sDefault = sDefault
End Property
Property Get Default() As String
    Default = m_sDefault
End Property
Property Let Path(sPath As String)
    m_sPath = sPath
End Property
Property Get Path() As String
    Path = m_sPath
End Property
Property Let Key(sKey As String)
    m_sKey = sKey
End Property
Property Get Key() As String
    Key = m_sKey
End Property
Property Let Section(sSection As String)
    m_sSection = sSection
End Property
Property Get Section() As String
    Section = m_sSection
End Property
Property Get Value() As String
Dim sBuf As String
Dim iSize As String
Dim iRetCode As Integer

    sBuf = Space$(255)
    iSize = Len(sBuf)
    iRetCode = GetPrivateProfileString(m_sSection, m_sKey, m_sDefault, sBuf,
     iSize, m_sPath)
    If (iSize > 0) Then
        Value = Left$(sBuf, iRetCode)
    Else
        Value = ""
    End If

End Property
Property Let Value(sValue As String)
Dim iPos As Integer
    ' Strip chr$(0):
    iPos = InStr(sValue, Chr$(0))
    Do While iPos <> 0
        sValue = Left$(sValue, (iPos - 1)) & Mid$(sValue, (iPos + 1))
        iPos = InStr(sValue, Chr$(0))
    Loop
    m_lLastReturnCode = WritePrivateProfileString(m_sSection, m_sKey, sValue,
     m_sPath)
End Property
Public Sub DeleteKey()
    m_lLastReturnCode = WritePrivateProfileString(m_sSection, m_sKey, 0&,
     m_sPath)
End Sub
Public Sub DeleteSection()
    m_lLastReturnCode = WritePrivateProfileString(m_sSection, 0&, 0&, m_sPath)
End Sub
Property Get INISection() As String
Dim sBuf As String
Dim iSize As String
Dim iRetCode As Integer

    sBuf = Space$(8192)
    iSize = Len(sBuf)
    iRetCode = GetPrivateProfileString(m_sSection, 0&, m_sDefault, sBuf, iSize,
     m_sPath)
    If (iSize > 0) Then
        INISection = Left$(sBuf, iRetCode)
    Else
        INISection = ""
    End If

End Property
Property Let INISection(sSection As String)
    m_lLastReturnCode = WritePrivateProfileString(m_sSection, 0&, sSection,
     m_sPath)
End Property
Property Get Sections() As String
Dim sBuf As String
Dim iSize As String
Dim iRetCode As Integer

    sBuf = Space$(8192)
    iSize = Len(sBuf)
    iRetCode = GetPrivateProfileString(0&, 0&, m_sDefault, sBuf, iSize, m_sPath)
    If (iSize > 0) Then
        Sections = Left$(sBuf, iRetCode)
    Else
        Sections = ""
    End If

End Property
Public Sub EnumerateCurrentSection(ByRef sKey() As String, ByRef iCount As Long)
Dim sSection As String
Dim iPos As Long
Dim iNextPos As Long
Dim sCur As String

    iCount = 0
    Erase sKey
    sSection = INISection
    If (Len(sSection) > 0) Then
        iPos = 1
        iNextPos = InStr(iPos, sSection, Chr$(0))
        Do While iNextPos <> 0
            sCur = Mid$(sSection, iPos, (iNextPos - iPos))
            If (sCur <> Chr$(0)) Then
                iCount = iCount + 1
                ReDim Preserve sKey(1 To iCount) As String
                sKey(iCount) = Mid$(sSection, iPos, (iNextPos - iPos))
                iPos = iNextPos + 1
                iNextPos = InStr(iPos, sSection, Chr$(0))
            End If
        Loop
    End If
End Sub
Public Sub EnumerateAllSections(ByRef sSections() As String, ByRef iCount As
 Long)
Dim sIniFile As String
Dim iPos As Long
Dim iNextPos As Long
Dim sCur As String

    iCount = 0
    Erase sSections
    sIniFile = Sections
    If (Len(sIniFile) > 0) Then
        iPos = 1
        iNextPos = InStr(iPos, sIniFile, Chr$(0))
        Do While iNextPos <> 0
            If (iNextPos <> iPos) Then
                sCur = Mid$(sIniFile, iPos, (iNextPos - iPos))
                iCount = iCount + 1
                ReDim Preserve sSections(1 To iCount) As String
                sSections(iCount) = sCur
            End If
            iPos = iNextPos + 1
            iNextPos = InStr(iPos, sIniFile, Chr$(0))
        Loop
    End If

End Sub
Public Sub SaveFormPosition(ByRef frmThis As Object)
Dim sSaveKey As String
Dim sSaveDefault As String
On Error GoTo SaveError
    sSaveKey = Key
    If Not (frmThis.WindowState = vbMinimized) Then
        Key = "Maximised"
        Value = (frmThis.WindowState = vbMaximized) * -1
        If (frmThis.WindowState <> vbMaximized) Then
            Key = "Left"
            Value = frmThis.Left
            Key = "Top"
            Value = frmThis.Top
            Key = "Width"
            Value = frmThis.Width
            Key = "Height"
            Value = frmThis.Height
        End If
    End If
    Key = sSaveKey
    Exit Sub
SaveError:
    Key = sSaveKey
    m_lLastReturnCode = 0
    Exit Sub
End Sub
Public Sub LoadFormPosition(ByRef frmThis As Object, Optional ByRef lMinWidth =
 3000, Optional ByRef lMinHeight = 3000)
Dim sSaveKey As String
Dim sSaveDefault As String
Dim lLeft As Long
Dim lTOp As Long
Dim lWidth As Long
Dim lHeight As Long
On Error GoTo LoadError
    sSaveKey = Key
    sSaveDefault = Default
    Default = "FAIL"
    Key = "Left"
    lLeft = CLngDefault(Value, frmThis.Left)
    Key = "Top"
    lTOp = CLngDefault(Value, frmThis.Top)
    Key = "Width"
    lWidth = CLngDefault(Value, frmThis.Width)
    If (lWidth < lMinWidth) Then lWidth = lMinWidth
    Key = "Height"
    lHeight = CLngDefault(Value, frmThis.Height)
    If (lHeight < lMinHeight) Then lHeight = lMinHeight
    If (lLeft < 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelX) Then lLeft = 4 *
     Screen.TwipsPerPixelX
    If (lTOp < 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelY) Then lTOp = 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelY
    If (lLeft + lWidth > Screen.Width - 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelX) Then
        lLeft = Screen.Width - 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelX - lWidth
        If (lLeft < 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelX) Then lLeft = 4 *
         Screen.TwipsPerPixelX
        If (lLeft + lWidth > Screen.Width - 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelX) Then
            lWidth = Screen.Width - lLeft - 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelX
        End If
    End If
    If (lTOp + lHeight > Screen.Height - 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelY) Then
        lTOp = Screen.Height - 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelY - lHeight
        If (lTOp < 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelY) Then lTOp = 4 *
         Screen.TwipsPerPixelY
        If (lTOp + lHeight > Screen.Height - 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelY) Then
            lHeight = Screen.Height - lTOp - 4 * Screen.TwipsPerPixelY
        End If
    End If
    If (lWidth >= lMinWidth) And (lHeight >= lMinHeight) Then
        frmThis.Move lLeft, lTOp, lWidth, lHeight
    End If
    Key = "Maximised"
    If (CLngDefault(Value, 0) <> 0) Then
        frmThis.WindowState = vbMaximized
    End If
    Key = sSaveKey
    Default = sSaveDefault
    Exit Sub
LoadError:
    Key = sSaveKey
    Default = sSaveDefault
    m_lLastReturnCode = 0
    Exit Sub
End Sub
Public Function CLngDefault(ByVal sString As String, Optional ByVal lDefault As
 Long = 0) As Long
Dim lR As Long
On Error Resume Next
    lR = CLng(sString)
    If (Err.Number <> 0) Then
        CLngDefault = lDefault
    Else
        CLngDefault = lR
    End If
End Function
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. And I didn't mean to be insulting with the 'olden days' comments -- I've seen people do really impressive (to me) things in VB6. –  Jay Riggs Feb 13 '09 at 21:50
    
I certainly wasn't insulted! I'll look into the class you suggested when I get back to work (on vacation this week). –  Fred Hamilton Feb 17 '09 at 10:35
    
Currently, the link is now dead. –  Ju-chan Nov 27 '14 at 5:57
    
@Ju-chan I updated the link and added the code. –  Jay Riggs Nov 27 '14 at 6:48
    
Yeah! Thanks Jay! –  Ju-chan Nov 27 '14 at 7:30

Would and XML file be acceptable:-

<config>
    <someAppPart
        AbsMaxVoltage="17.5"
        AbsMinVoltage="5.5"
    />
    <someOtherAppPart
        ForegroundColor="Black"
        BackgroundColor="White"
    />
</config>

Its very easy to consume in VB6, you don't need to worry about positioning etc.

The downside is its the user tweaking it can make it unparsable, however thats true if you write your own parser for a config file.

share|improve this answer
    
It's the downside you mentioned that worries me (also most of my customers are a bit unsophisticated and will see the nested structure and formatting as a pain). Thanks for the suggestion - I've been listening to the Stack Overflow podcast for months; it's great to see the community in action! –  Fred Hamilton Feb 17 '09 at 10:39
    
Its not really more nested than a typical .ini although it might be more scary it shouldn't phase someone who wants to tweak something calls AbsMaxVoltage ;) –  AnthonyWJones Feb 17 '09 at 11:06

If we can assume your saved settings are simply a set of name/value pairs without a two-level hierarchy requirement (i.e. INI "Keys" within "Sections") you might just persist them as such:

AbsMaxVoltage=17.5
AbsMinVoltage=5.5

For writing the persistence format this is a case where you might consider the FSO, since the access volume is low anyway. The FSO can handle read/writing Unicode text files.

I think I'd do something like read lines and parse them using a Split() on "=" specifying just 2 parts (thus allowing "=" within values as well). For loading these I'd store them into a simple Class instance where the Class has two properties (Name and Value) and add each one to a Collection using Name as the Key. Make Value the default property if desired.

Maybe even implement some form of comment text line too using a generated sequence-numbered special Name value stored as say Name="%1" Value="comment text" with generated unique Names to avoid Collection Key collisions. Blank lines might be similarly preserved.

Then persisting as necessary means simply using a For Each on the Collection and using the FSO to write Name=Value out to disk.

To simulate a hierarchy you could simply use Names like:

%Comment: somAppPart settings
someAppPart.AbsMaxVoltage=17.5
someAppPart.AbsMinVoltage=5.5

%someOtherPart settings
someOtherAppPart.ForegroundColor=Black
someOtherAppPart.BackgroundColor=White

The parsing is cheap, so any probing of the Collection might be preceded by a full reparse (as the INI API calls do). Any changing of values in the program might do a full rewrite to disk (like the INI API calls do).

Some of this can be automated by just wrapping the Collection with some logic in another Class. The result could be syntax like:

Settings("someOtherAppPart", "ForegroundColor") = "Red"

aka

Settings.Value("someOtherAppPart", "ForegroundColor") = "Red"

This would reload the Collection, then probe the Collection for an Item keyed "someOtherAppPart.ForegroundColor" and create it or set its Value to "Red" and then flush the Collection to disk. Or you might eschew frequent rewriting and use distinct Load and Save methods.

Make it as simple or fancy as desired.

In any case, the result is a text file users can hack at with Notepad. The only reason for the FSO is to have an easy way of read/writing Unicode text. One could also screw around with Byte array I/O and explicit conversions (array to String) and line level parsing as required to avoid the FSO. If so just don't forget about the UTF-16LE BOM.

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