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I'm writing a message board webpage. The page consists of a Topic item, then a list of Response and a form to add an additional response.

Im struggling to structure my page and viewdata classes in such a way that they are clean and allow me to take advantage for editor templates and validation attributes.

Currently I have one page to do all the above, and Im thinking my viewdata class will eventually look something like this:

public class TopicViewsData
    {
        [ValidateNonEmpty("Please enter some text")]
        public string Title { get; set; }

        [ValidateNonEmpty("Please enter some text")]
        public string TopicBody { get; set; }

        public IList<TopicResponseViewsData> Responses { get; set; }

        public TopicResponseViewsData NewResponse { get; set; }

    }

    public class TopicResponseViewsData
    {
        [ValidateNonEmpty("Please enter some text")]
        public string ResponseText{ get; set; }
    }

My page is typed to a TopicViewsData, it just seems ugly that I have to have NewResponse property just so the page can have access to the validation attributes on TopicResponseViewsData. Is there a nicer way to do this?

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I'm Not clear about your last para? –  gideon Mar 29 '11 at 18:52
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2 Answers

Sounds like you are headed towards a massive and complex view, not to mention the issues you are already seeing with your model structuring. Rather than making trade offs to make what you have work I have a few recommendations on your overall view model design.

I tend to separate my models into ViewModels and FormModels. ViewModels are for displaying data and FormModels are for taking user input. Not only does this provide a clear designation of function it generally allows me to keep my FormModel properties typed to primitives, strings, and dates in addition to providing a single place for applying validation logic. While, in my ViewModels I am afforded the flexibility to use complex property types and do not have to worry about validation logic.

To make things even easier I follow Jimmy Bogard's suggestion that you should have only one view per model. By not mixing and matching models I have found my models stay focused and my views do not turn into spaghetti. To keep things tidy I name my models similarly to the Controller and View they are tied to. I might end up with a few extra models, but it is a small price to pay for a cleaner design.

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I think that the Body property in the TopicViewsData model is redundant with the NewResponse property.

So your view is working with responses where each response has a body. So:

public class TopicResponseViewsData
{
    [ValidateNonEmpty("Please enter some text")]
    public string Body { get; set; }
}

So far so good. Next you said that you have a list of responses to show and a new response to add, so:

public class TopicViewsData
{
    public IList<TopicResponseViewsData> Responses { get; set; }
    public TopicResponseViewsData NewResponse { get; set; }
}

For the moment, given your description that's all I see necessary in the view model. At least model reflects your scenario description.

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I think I have mislead you. Iv change the property names to make it clearer? –  Dan Mar 29 '11 at 19:02
    
@Dan, then your model looks fine. What's the problem? –  Darin Dimitrov Mar 29 '11 at 19:04
    
it just seems ugly that I have to have NewResponse property just so the page can have access to the validation attributes on TopicResponseViewsData –  Dan Mar 29 '11 at 19:13
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