Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this string in C# adj_con(CL2,1,3,0),adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0),NG, NG/CL, 5 value of CL(JK), HO I want to use a RegEx to parse it to get the following:

adj_con(CL2,1,3,0)
adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0)
NG
NG/CL
5 value of CL(JK)
HO

Googled and tried different regex, none works. I am pretty new to RegEx.

thank you all. In addition to the above example, I tested with this "%exc.uns: 8 hours let @ = ABC, DEF", "exc_it = 1 day" , " summ=graffe ", " a,b,(c,d)" , still unable to parse it correctly.

thanks again

The new text will be in one string string mystr = @"""%exc.uns: 8 hours let @ = ABC, DEF"", ""exc_it = 1 day"" , "" summ=graffe "", "" a,b,(c,d)""";

share|improve this question
    
Could the input have nested parens? –  harpo Mar 29 '11 at 19:35
1  
You can loop through all the characters, then you need to have a parenthesis count, starting at zero, when you find an opening parenthesis you increase it, and the inverse for the closing one. Then you only break the string if the current character is a comma and the parenthesis count is 0. (Posting in the comments because I don't have time to write code right now) –  user216441 Mar 29 '11 at 19:35
    
This can't be parsed with a regular expression. It can only be parsed with the rules that make up the constuction of the original pieces of data that constitute a field in this csv (?) record. Perhaps resulting in a record that looks like this: adj_con(CL2,1,3,0, "),adj_cont(CL1",1,b(3,0),'(') –  sln Mar 29 '11 at 20:30
    
@sln - Actually, .net patterns can handle that. A few modification can be made to the pattern I've posted to parse your added requirement. –  Kobi Mar 29 '11 at 20:57
    
Is the new text 4 examples, or one? How does it look in string form? –  Kobi Mar 31 '11 at 5:11

9 Answers 9

string str = "adj_con(CL2,1,3,0),adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0),NG, NG/CL, 5 value of CL(JK), HO";
var resultStrings = new List<string>();
int? firstIndex = null;
int scopeLevel = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
{
    if (str[i] == ',' && scopeLevel == 0)
    {
        resultStrings.Add(str.Substring(firstIndex.GetValueOrDefault(), i - firstIndex.GetValueOrDefault()));
        firstIndex = i + 1;
    }
    else if (str[i] == '(') scopeLevel++;
    else if (str[i] == ')') scopeLevel--;
}
resultStrings.Add(str.Substring(firstIndex.GetValueOrDefault()));
share|improve this answer

Event faster:

([^,]*\x28[^\x29]*\x29|[^,]+)

That should do the trick. Basically, look for either a "function thumbprint" or anything without a comma.

adj_con(CL2,1,3,0),adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0),NG, NG/CL, 5 value of CL(JK), HO
                  ^                   ^  ^      ^                  ^

The Carets symbolize where the grouping stops.

share|improve this answer
    
Demo can be found here, too. –  Brad Christie Mar 29 '11 at 19:52
    
If I'm reading correctly, it assumes the parentheses are always at the end on the token. –  Kobi Mar 29 '11 at 20:24
    
@Kobi: Yes, you are correct. Given more sample data I could make it more robust. This also doesn't ignore padding (white space) around the token, but a trim can easily do that. –  Brad Christie Mar 29 '11 at 20:27
    
@Kobi: ((?:[^,]*\x28[^\x29]*\x29[^,]*)+|[^,]+) that will, however. ;-) –  Brad Christie Mar 29 '11 at 20:30

Assuming non nested, matching parentheses, you can easily match the tokens you want instead of splitting the string:

MatchCollection matches = Regex.Matches(data, @"(?:[^(),]|\([^)]*\))+");
share|improve this answer
    
thank you all. In addition to the original example, I tested with this "%exc.uns: 8 hours let @ = ABC, DEF", "exc_it = 1 day" , " summ=graffe ", " a,b,(c,d)" , still unable to parse it correctly. thanks again –  Susu Mar 30 '11 at 22:04

Just this regex:

[^,()]+(\([^()]*\))?

A test example:

var s= "adj_con(CL2,1,3,0),adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0),NG, NG/CL, 5 value of CL(JK), HO";
Regex regex = new Regex(@"[^,()]+(\([^()]*\))?");
var matches = regex.Matches(s)
    .Cast<Match>()
    .Select(m => m.Value);

returns

adj_con(CL2,1,3,0)
adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0)
NG
 NG/CL
 5 value of CL(JK)
 HO
share|improve this answer
    
The live example could find here: rubular.com/r/BqWvQFaxFZ –  Alex Apr 1 '11 at 10:55

If you simply must use Regex, then you can split the string on the following:

,                # match a comma
(?=              # that is followed by
  (?:            # either
    [^\(\)]*     #  no parens at all
    |            # or
    (?:          #  
      [^\(\)]*   #  ...
      \(         #  (
      [^\(\)]*   #     stuff in parens
      \)         #  )
      [^\(\)]*   #  ...
    )+           #  any number of times
  )$             # until the end of the string
)

It breaks your input into the following:

adj_con(CL2,1,3,0)
adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0)
NG
NG/CL
5 value of CL(JK)
HO

You can also use .NET's balanced grouping constructs to create a version that works with nested parens, but you're probably just as well off with one of the non-Regex solutions.

share|improve this answer
var s = "adj_con(CL2,1,3,0),adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0),NG, NG/CL, 5 value of CL(JK), HO";  
var result = string.Join(@"\n",Regex.Split(s, @"(?<=\)),|,\s"));  

The pattern matches for ) and excludes it from the match then matches , or matches , followed by a space.

result =

adj_con(CL2,1,3,0)
adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0)
NG
NG/CL
5 value of CL(JK)
HO

share|improve this answer

The TextFieldParser (msdn) class seems to have the functionality built-in:

TextFieldParser Class: - Provides methods and properties for parsing structured text files.

Parsing a text file with the TextFieldParser is similar to iterating over a text file, while the ReadFields method to extract fields of text is similar to splitting the strings.

The TextFieldParser can parse two types of files: delimited or fixed-width. Some properties, such as Delimiters and HasFieldsEnclosedInQuotes are meaningful only when working with delimited files, while the FieldWidths property is meaningful only when working with fixed-width files.

See the article which helped me find that

share|improve this answer
    
Can it take ( and ) as quotes? I didn't find it in the documentation. I didn't .Net has a CSV parser though... –  Kobi Mar 29 '11 at 20:25

Here's a stronger option, which parses the whole text, including nested parentheses:

string pattern = @"
\A
(?>
    (?<Token>
        (?:
            [^,()]              # Regular character
            |
            (?<Paren> \( )      # Opening paren - push to stack
            |
            (?<-Paren> \) )     # Closing paren - pop
            |
            (?(Paren),)         # If inside parentheses, match comma.
        )*?
    )
    (?(Paren)(?!))    # If we are not inside parentheses,
    (?:,|\Z)          # match a comma or the end
)*? # lazy just to avoid an extra empty match at the end,
    #  though it removes a last empty token.
\Z
";
Match match = Regex.Match(data, pattern, RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace);

You can get all matches by iterating over match.Groups["Token"].Captures.

share|improve this answer

Another way to implement what Snowbear was doing:

    public static string[] SplitNest(this string s, char src, string nest, string trg)
    {
        int scope = 0;
        if (trg == null || nest == null) return null;
        if (trg.Length == 0 || nest.Length < 2) return null;
        if (trg.IndexOf(src) >= 0) return null;
        if (nest.IndexOf(src) >= 0) return null;

        for (int i = 0; i < s.Length; i++)
        {
            if (s[i] == src && scope == 0)
            {
                s = s.Remove(i, 1).Insert(i, trg);
            }
            else if (s[i] == nest[0]) scope++;
            else if (s[i] == nest[1]) scope--;
        }

        return s.Split(trg);
    }

The idea is to replace any non-nested delimiter with another delimiter that you can then use with an ordinary string.Split(). You can also choose what type of bracket to use - (), <>, [], or even something weird like \/, ][, or `'. For your purposes you would use

string str = "adj_con(CL2,1,3,0),adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0),NG, NG/CL, 5 value of CL(JK), HO";
string[] result = str.SplitNest(',',"()","~");

The function would first turn your string into

adj_con(CL2,1,3,0)~adj_cont(CL1,1,3,0)~NG~ NG/CL~ 5 value of CL(JK)~ HO

then split on the ~, ignoring the nested commas.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.