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Whatever is inside finally blocks is executed (almost) always, so what's the difference between enclosing code into it or leaving it unclosed?

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3  
What do you mean by leaving it unclosed? –  Ramesh Feb 13 '09 at 21:37
2  
And what do you mean by "(almost)"? –  Beska Feb 13 '09 at 21:38
    
That is not true at all. The whole point is that if an error occurs, control will jump to the catch block. The only way it would always run all of the code is if no exception ever occurred, and then why would you use the try/catch at all? –  Ed S. Feb 13 '09 at 21:42
20  
If you pull the power cord out while a machine is executing a try clause the finally clause will not be called. –  Dour High Arch Feb 13 '09 at 21:43
2  
lol, yes, that's true, but you can't really code for that can you? –  Ed S. Feb 13 '09 at 21:45

11 Answers 11

up vote 194 down vote accepted

The code inside a finally block will get executed regardless of whether or not there is an exception. This comes in very handy when it comes to certain housekeeping functions you need to always run like closing connections.

Now, I'm guessing your question is why you should do this:

try
{
    doSomething();
}
catch
{
    catchSomething();
}
finally
{
    alwaysDoThis();
}

When you can do this:

try
{
    doSomething();
}
catch
{
    catchSomething();
}

alwaysDoThis();

The answer is that a lot of times the code inside your catch statement will either rethrow an exception or break out of the current function. With the latter code, the "alwaysDoThis();" call won't execute if the code inside the catch statement issues a return or throws a new exception.

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1  
Hmm. Very similar to what I said, but clearer and more exact. Definite +1. –  Beska Feb 13 '09 at 21:44
14  
this applies to "return" inside the try{} block, too. –  Lucas Feb 13 '09 at 21:47
3  
in fact, it applies even without a catch{} block (just try/finally, letting exceptions bubble up) –  Lucas Feb 13 '09 at 21:49
    
better then mine, was at work and didn't want to spend ten minutes answering it in detail. +1 –  Matt Briggs Feb 13 '09 at 22:23
2  
Yes, this was exactly what I had in mind :D Now I understand it. –  Rodrigo Feb 13 '09 at 23:01

Most advantages of using try-finally have already been pointed out, but I thought I'd add this one:

try
{
    // Code here that might throw an exception...

    if (arbitraryCondition)
    {
        return true;
    }

    // Code here that might throw an exception...
}
finally
{
    // Code here gets executed regardless of whether "return true;" was called within the try block (i.e. regardless of the value of arbitraryCondition).
}

This behaviour makes it very useful in various situations, particularly when you need to perform cleanup (dispose resources), though a using block is often better in this case.

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Because finally will get executed even if you do not handle an exception in a catch block.

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any time you use unmanaged code requests like stream readers, db requests, etc; and you want to catch the exception then use try catch finally and close the stream, data reader, etc. in the finally, if you don't when it errors the connection doesn't get closed, this is really bad with db requests

 SqlConnection myConn = new SqlConnection("Connectionstring");
        try
        {
            myConn.Open();
            //make na DB Request                
        }
        catch (Exception DBException)
        {
            //do somehting with exception
        }
        finally
        {
           myConn.Close();
           myConn.Dispose();
        }

if you don't want to catch the error then use

 using (SqlConnection myConn = new SqlConnection("Connectionstring"))
        {
            myConn.Open();
            //make na DB Request
            myConn.Close();
        }

and the connection object will be disposed of automatically if there is an error, but you don't capture the error

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2  
Dispose() will also Close() the connection, no need to call both. Close() does NOT Dipose(), you can reopen the connection. –  Lucas Feb 13 '09 at 23:05
    
Nice, thanks for mentioning using. I would have to answer, otherwise. –  Yar Aug 1 '09 at 1:27

finally, as in:

try {
  // do something risky
} catch (Exception ex) {
  // handle an exception
} finally {
  // do any required cleanup
}

is a garunteed opportunity to execute code after your try..catch block, regardless of whether or not your try block threw an exception.

That makes it perfect for things like releasing resources, db connections, file handles, etc.

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2  
All of those examples are typically better served with a using block, but that doesn't really detract from your answer. –  Joel Coehoorn Feb 13 '09 at 21:43
    
I wish I could +1 on your comment. Both clauses are perfect. –  Beska Feb 13 '09 at 21:45

Say you need to set the cursor back to the default pointer instead of a waiting (hourglass) cursor. If an exception is thrown before setting the cursor, and doesn't outright crash the app, you could be left with a confusing cursor.

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Sometimes you don't want to handle an exception (no catch block), but you want some cleanup code to execute.

For example:

try
{
    // exception (or not)
}
finally
{
    // clean up always
}
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If the exception is not caught, execution of the finally block depends on whether the operating system chooses to trigger an exception unwind operation. –  Vikas Verma Sep 22 '14 at 18:18

The finally block is valuable for cleaning up any resources allocated in the try block as well as running any code that must execute even if there is an exception. Control is always passed to the finally block regardless of how the try block exits.

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Finally statements can execute even after return.

private int myfun()
{
    int a = 100; //any number
    int b = 0;
    try
    {
        a = (5 / b);
        return a;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        Response.Write(ex.Message);
        return a;
    }

 //   Response.Write("Statement after return before finally");  -->this will give error "Syntax error, 'try' expected"
    finally
    {
      Response.Write("Statement after return in finally"); // --> This will execute , even after having return code above
    } 

    Response.Write("Statement after return after finally");  // -->Unreachable code
}
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Ahh...I think I see what you're saying! Took me a sec...you're wondering "why place it in the finally block instead of after the finally block and completely outside the try-catch-finally".

As an example, it might be because you are halting execution if you throw an error, but you still want to clean up resources, such as open files, database connections, etc.

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By using a finally block, you can clean up any resources that are allocated in a try block, and you can run code even if an exception occurs in the try block. Typically, the statements of a finally block run when control leaves a try statement. The transfer of control can occur as a result of normal execution, of execution of a break, continue, goto, or return statement, or of propagation of an exception out of the try statement.

Within a handled exception, the associated finally block is guaranteed to be run. However, if the exception is unhandled, execution of the finally block is dependent on how the exception unwind operation is triggered. That, in turn, is dependent on how your computer is set up. For more information, see Unhandled Exception Processing in the CLR.

Usually, when an unhandled exception ends an application, whether or not the finally block is run is not important. However, if you have statements in a finally block that must be run even in that situation, one solution is to add a catch block to the try-finally statement. Alternatively, you can catch the exception that might be thrown in the try block of a try-finally statement higher up the call stack. That is, you can catch the exception in the method that calls the method that contains the try-finally statement, or in the method that calls that method, or in any method in the call stack. If the exception is not caught, execution of the finally block depends on whether the operating system chooses to trigger an exception unwind operation.

public class ThrowTestA
{
    static void Main()
    {
        int i = 123;
        string s = "Some string";
        object obj = s;

        try
        {
            // Invalid conversion; obj contains a string, not a numeric type.
            i = (int)obj;

            // The following statement is not run.
            Console.WriteLine("WriteLine at the end of the try block.");
        }
        finally
        {
            // To run the program in Visual Studio, type CTRL+F5. Then  
            // click Cancel in the error dialog.
            Console.WriteLine("\nExecution of the finally block after an unhandled\n" +
                "error depends on how the exception unwind operation is triggered.");
            Console.WriteLine("i = {0}", i);
        }
    }
    // Output: 
    // Unhandled Exception: System.InvalidCastException: Specified cast is not valid. 
    // 
    // Execution of the finally block after an unhandled 
    // error depends on how the exception unwind operation is triggered. 
    // i = 123
}

In the following example, an exception from the TryCast method is caught in a method farther up the call stack. C#

public class ThrowTestB
{
    static void Main()
    {
        try
        {
            // TryCast produces an unhandled exception.
            TryCast();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // Catch the exception that is unhandled in TryCast.
            Console.WriteLine
                ("Catching the {0} exception triggers the finally block.",
                ex.GetType());

            // Restore the original unhandled exception. You might not 
            // know what exception to expect, or how to handle it, so pass  
            // it on. 
            throw;
        }
    }

    public static void TryCast()
    {
        int i = 123;
        string s = "Some string";
        object obj = s;

        try
        {
            // Invalid conversion; obj contains a string, not a numeric type.
            i = (int)obj;

            // The following statement is not run.
            Console.WriteLine("WriteLine at the end of the try block.");
        }
        finally
        {
            // Report that the finally block is run, and show that the value of 
            // i has not been changed.
            Console.WriteLine("\nIn the finally block in TryCast, i = {0}.\n", i);
        }
    }
    // Output: 
    // In the finally block in TryCast, i = 123. 

    // Catching the System.InvalidCastException exception triggers the finally block. 

    // Unhandled Exception: System.InvalidCastException: Specified cast is not valid.
}
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