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I have a list of stuff with thing like

                    <ul>
                        <li>
                            <div class="pack1 active1"><span>$3.99</span></div>
                        </li>
                        <li>
                            <div class="pack2"><span>$5.99</span></div>
                        </li>
                        <li>
                            <div class="pack3 active3"><div id="ribbon"><span>40</span></div><span>$6.99</span></div>
                        </li>
                        <li>
                            <div class="pack4"><span>$10.99</span></div>
                        </li>
                        <li>
                            <div class="pack5"><span>$259.99</span></div>
                        </li>
                    </ul>

and I want to remove all the active* classes on click. I've tried to do something like $('*[class^="active"]').removeClass() but that isn't working

Any help?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

OK, I tested it and this definitely works even if there are more than one "active-something" classes assigned to one element:

$('[class*="active"]').removeClass(function(i, c) {
  return c.match(/active\d+/g).join(" ");
});

The 'i' is the index of matched element and 'c' is the value of the class attribute for the matched element so you don't need to "ask" for it again. $("...").removeClass() can remove all classes specified by the value so if there are more than one "active-something" classes assigned to this element we're returning all the occurences from the call to match (using the 'g' option at the end of the regular expression) and then concatenating it so that the actual removeClass function then can process it accordingly.

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1  
+1 - However, if you run this function on a collection of elements that may or may not have the specified class, match will return null which causes a syntax error when you try to run the join method. Obviously selecting the elements with $('[class*="active"]') negates the issue, but if you're working with a collection of elements selected by some other criteria you would need to check if the element has a desired class or convert the null output of match to an empty array. –  Bryan Downing May 7 '12 at 7:50

Something like this might do:

$('*[class~="active"]').removeClass(function() {
    var match = $(this).attr('class').match(/active\d{1,}/);
    return match ? match[0] : '';
});

Basically, you are returning the classname that match finds

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Try the following

$('[class~="active"]').removeClass();

The ~= syntax matches attributes who's value contains the specified word. Documentation

The ^= syntax used in your question matches attribute values which start with the specified text. This doesn't appear to be what you're looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
This might be problematic if ever the user has a class called inactive or any other class name that contains the text active –  Dutchie432 Mar 29 '11 at 20:30
    
@Dutchie432 agreed. But the OP's question said they wanted to remove classes which had active in the name. –  JaredPar Mar 29 '11 at 20:30
    
Agreed. I think (IMHO) that description of the user's situation is most likely misleading. I suppose I am making an assumption about what the user wants. This is a great pointer otherwise. –  Dutchie432 Mar 29 '11 at 20:33
    
The word is not "active" but "active1" or "active2" which does not fall into the selector... –  Matthias Hryniszak Mar 29 '11 at 21:00
    
And the description ain't misleading IMHO. It's short and to the point. But that's me :D –  Matthias Hryniszak Mar 29 '11 at 21:04
$('div[class^="active"]').click(function() {
    $(this).each(function() {
       $(this).removeClass();
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
^="..." matches only if the value of the attribute starts with "active" which is not the case... –  Matthias Hryniszak Mar 29 '11 at 20:58
    
One more thing: removeClass() without parameters removes all classes - not only the requested one... So you need to use it VERY CAREFULLY! –  Matthias Hryniszak Mar 29 '11 at 21:01
    
You are right, removeClass() is definitely not what he needs –  Adrien Schuler Mar 29 '11 at 21:09
$('div[class*="active"]').removeClass(function() {
    return $(this).attr("class").match(/active\d{1}/).join(" ");
});
share|improve this answer
    
you don't need to ask for the class again - it's passed on to the callback method –  Matthias Hryniszak Mar 29 '11 at 20:59
    
I just got that! The solution below from Matthias Hryniszak is a better solution... –  Mark Costello Mar 30 '11 at 14:21

Your description doesn't say what you want to click on; what should trigger what; or how you want to treat inactive members etc. So...I'll embellished a bit on the functionality.

What you do really depends on how much control you have on the HTML in question. But there's no way to really determine that from your explanation. However, if you want to affect all classes that START WITH "active" then use this my examples event-definition: $('div[class^="active"]')

In the meantime, let's pretend you HAVE some control on the HTML in question.

Here is some food for thought

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" >
<head runat="server">
    <title></title>

    <script src="Includes/JavaScript/jQuery/version1.4.4/Core/jquery-1.4.4.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

    <style type="text/css">
        .list li
        {
            cursor: pointer;
        }
        .active
        {
            color: Green;
        }
        .inactive
        {
            color: grey;
        }
    </style>

    <script type="text/javascript">

        ///<summary>Removes an active row.</summary>
        function deactivate() {
            $(this).parent().remove();
        }
        ///<summary>Change an inactive row to an active row.</summary>
        function activate() {
            $(this).removeClass('inactive').addClass('active').click(deactivate);
        }

        $(document).ready(function() {
            // Also, just as an extra, use "context" to limit the scope of any jQuery selector-search.
            // That way on large pages your selector doesn't search through the whole page,
            // it only searches the tables HTML.
            // Doing so is a short-cut for: $('#tblMyTable').find('tr.clickTrigger');
            var context = $('ul.list');

            $('div.inactive', context).click(activate);
            $('div.active', context).click(deactivate);
        });
    </script>

</head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
         <ul class="list">
            <li>
                <div class="pack1 active">
                    <span>$3.99</span>
                </div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <div class="pack2 inactive">
                    <span>$5.99</span>
                </div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <div class="pack3 active">
                    <div id="ribbon">
                        <span>40</span>&nbsp;@&nbsp;<span>$6.99</span>
                    </div>
                </div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <div class="pack4 inactive">
                    <span>$10.99</span>
                </div>
            </li>
            <li>
                <div class="pack5 inactive">
                    <span>$259.99</span>
                </div>
            </li>
        </ul>
    </form>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

Here is a bit better implementation:

    $('.my-selector').removeClass(function(i, c)
    {
        return c.match(/\S*active\S*/g) ? c.match(/\S*active\S*/g).join(' ') : false;
    });
share|improve this answer

How many different active classes are there? You could just do...

for (var x=1; x<=5; x++)
    $('.active' + x).removeClass('active' + x);

JSFiddle Live Demo

share|improve this answer
    
There is only 5 of them so this seems like the easiest way. –  Steven Mar 29 '11 at 20:31
    
If there were 500, all you would need to do is change the x<=5 to x<=500 - The code does not become more lengthy. –  Dutchie432 Mar 29 '11 at 20:34
2  
don't do it like this - it's a performance killer! –  Matthias Hryniszak Mar 29 '11 at 21:02
    
For 5 classes? Not likely. For 1,000 - maybe. –  Dutchie432 Mar 29 '11 at 22:37

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