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I have a Crate object, which has a List of KeyValuePairs. Currently, I'm iterating through each pair to see if the kvp.Value.PixelsWide are the same for all items in the List. If they are, return true, else false.

The existing method that I have is shown below:

public bool Validate(Crate crate)
    {
        int firstSectionWidth = 0;
        foreach (KeyValuePair<string, SectionConfiguration> kvp in crate.Sections)
        {
            if (firstSectionWidth == 0)//first time in loop
            {
                firstSectionWidth = kvp.Value.PixelsWide;
            }
            else //not the first time in loop
            {
                if (kvp.Value.PixelsWide != firstSectionWidth)
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

I'm curious if this would be possible to execute in a LINQ query?

Thanks in advance for any help!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 22 down vote accepted

I believe this would work:

public bool Validate(Crate crate)
{
    return crate.Sections
                .Select(x => x.Value.PixelsWide)
                .Distinct()
                .Count() < 2;
}

This will return true if crate.Sections is empty as well as when the elements are all the same (which is the behavior of your current function).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like it. Nice inverting the test condition. –  user166390 Mar 29 '11 at 20:53
    
This did exactly what I needed, and accounted for the case where the collection was empty. Thanks for your help! –  JSprang Mar 29 '11 at 20:54
    
@pst Thanks! @JSprang Glad it helped! –  diceguyd30 Mar 29 '11 at 22:04
2  
An elegant solution. But Distinct() forces an iteration on all items and some kind of sort internally. If you know the list has few items, its ok. If the list is big or the Validate method is intensively used, you should try Stecya's sugestion. –  AntonioR Mar 30 '11 at 3:09
    
@AntonioR While it would, of course, iterate over all of them (Count makes sure of that), I would hope the internal operation of the Distinct operator wouldn't vary too much from Jon Skeet's reimplementation of it: msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2010/12/30/… –  diceguyd30 Mar 30 '11 at 4:46

Try this

var pixelsWide = rate.Sections.Values.First().PixelsWide;
bool result = crate.Sections.Values.All(x => x.PixelsWide == pixelsWide);
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2  
Throws an exception if there are no items. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 29 '11 at 20:47
1  
Than check if there is no items and return false –  Stecya Mar 29 '11 at 20:51
    
Per Yuriy, change to rate.Sections.Values.Select(x => x.PixelsWide).FirstOrDefault(); –  Porges Mar 29 '11 at 20:52
    
Hmm, would be great as an extension method, something like: IEnumerable<>.AllSame(propertyName) –  Jimmy May 24 '14 at 19:53

If you don't mind iterating through entire collection:

bool hasOneValue = crate.Sections.Select(s => s.Value.PixelsWide).Distinct().Count() == 1;

Or making it consistent with your code:

bool validateResult = crate.Sections.Select(s => s.Value.PixelsWide).Distinct().Count() <= 1;
share|improve this answer
    
Returns strange answer if there are no items. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 29 '11 at 20:47
    
It is not strange. I named it hasOneValue. no items doesn't has one value. –  Snowbear Mar 29 '11 at 20:49
1  
This is bad, as it does way more work than necessary. Not only does it iterate the whole collection, but it creates a Set<T> containing every existing value, and then iterates over that to count the values, only to compare the result to 1. –  Gabe Mar 29 '11 at 20:53
    
@Gabe, agree, but until we say optimization here I would prefer this approach because (IMO) it's more readable than other approaches with All or smth like that. –  Snowbear Mar 29 '11 at 20:57

Here's a variation on Stecya's answer that doesn't throw an exception for an empty collection.

var first = crate.Sections.Values.FirstOrDefault();
bool result = crate.Sections.Values.All(x => x.PixelsWide == first.PixelsWide);
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My version:

public bool Validate(Crate crate)
{
    return !crate.Sections
           .Any(a => crate.Sections
                     .Where(b => b.Value.PixelsWide != a.Value.PixelsWide).Any()
           );
}
share|improve this answer

I'm with @Stecya:

public class Crate
{
    IList<KeyValuePair<string,SectionConfiguration>> Sections ;

    public bool IsValid()
    {
        return Sections.All( x => x.Value.PixelsWide == Sections.FirstOrDefault().Value.PixelsWide ) ;
    }

    public class SectionConfiguration
    {
        public int PixelsWide ;
    }

}
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