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I was working on a project today, and found myself using Math.Max in several places and inline if statements in other places. So, I was wondering if anybody knew which is "better"... or rather, what the real differences are.

For example, in the following, c1 = c2:

Random rand = new Random();
int a = rand.next(0,10000);
int b = rand.next(0,10000);

int c1 = Math.Max(a, b);
int c2 = a>b ? a : b;

I'm asking specifically about C#, but I suppose the answer could be different in different languages, though I'm not sure which ones have similar concepts.

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You'd have to consider all these: Math.Max(a, b), Math.Max(b, a), a > b ? a : b, a < b ? b : a, b > a ? b : a, b < a ? a : a. –  BoltClock Mar 29 '11 at 21:07
10  
Code readability is far more valuable than any minuscule performance difference between the two. –  ceykooo Mar 29 '11 at 21:08
    
I don't think it makes any difference performance-wise, but Math.Max() is more readable, so I'd prefer that. –  BrokenGlass Mar 29 '11 at 21:08
    
I'd say Math.Max shows the intent of the code more clearly, which is important. –  asawyer Mar 29 '11 at 21:08
2  
@BoltClock, I don't think it's necessary to uniquely consider all of the commutatively equivalent statements. No matter how you slice it, Math.Max(a,b) is the same as Math.Max(b,a), just as a+b is the same as b+a –  chezy525 Mar 29 '11 at 21:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

One of the major differences I would notice right away would be for readability sake, as far as I know for implementation/performance sake, they would be nearly equivalent.

Math.Max(a,b) is very simple to understand, regardless of previous coding knowledge.

a>b ? a : b would require the user to have some knowledge of the ternary operator, at least.

"When in doubt - go for readability"

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Yep, nearly equivalent, that's the point. Math.Max does not require any knowledge? –  HABJAN Mar 29 '11 at 21:12
3  
Obviously it requires SOME knowledge. But I believe it is a great deal more straightforward than the alternative here. –  Rion Williams Mar 29 '11 at 21:14
    
You are right, anyway, what i wanted to say is that someone rather write short readable code and someone little longer optimized code. –  HABJAN Mar 29 '11 at 21:21

I thought it would be fun to throw in some numbers into this discussion so I wrote some code to profile it. As expected they are almost identical for all practical purposes.

The code does a billion loops (yep 1 billion). Subtracting the overhead of the loop you get:

  • Math.Max() took .0044 seconds to run 1 billion times
  • The inline if took .0055 seconds to run 1 billion times

I subtracted the overhead which I calculated by running an empty loop 1 billion times, the overhead was 1.2 seconds.

I ran this on a laptop, 64-bit Windows 7, 1.3 Ghz Intel Core i5 (U470). The code was compiled in release mode and ran without a debugger attached.

Here's the code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace TestMathMax {
    class Program {
        static int Main(string[] args) {
            var num1 = 10;
            var num2 = 100;
            var maxValue = 0;
            var LoopCount = 1000000000;
            double controlTotalSeconds;
            { 
                var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
                stopwatch.Start();
                for (var i = 0; i < LoopCount; i++) {
                    // do nothing
                }
                stopwatch.Stop();
                controlTotalSeconds = stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds;
                Console.WriteLine("Control - Empty Loop - " + controlTotalSeconds + " seconds");
            }
            Console.WriteLine();
            {
                var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
                stopwatch.Start();
                for (int i = 0; i < LoopCount; i++) {
                    maxValue = Math.Max(num1, num2);
                }
                stopwatch.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine("Math.Max() - " + stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds + " seconds");
                Console.WriteLine("Relative: " + (stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds - controlTotalSeconds) + " seconds");
            }
            Console.WriteLine();
            {
                var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
                stopwatch.Start();
                for (int i = 0; i < LoopCount; i++) {
                    maxValue = num1 > num2 ? num1 : num2;
                }
                stopwatch.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine("Inline Max: " + stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds + " seconds");
                Console.WriteLine("Relative: " + (stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds - controlTotalSeconds) + " seconds");
            }

            Console.ReadLine();

            return maxValue;
        }
    }
}
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If the JITer chooses to inline the Math.Max function, the executable code will be identical to the if statement. If Math.Max isn't inlined, it will execute as a function call with call and return overhead not present in the if statement. So, the if statement will give identical performance to Math.Max() in the inlining case or the if statement may be a few clock cycles faster in the non-inlined case, but the difference won't be noticeable unless you are running tens of millions of comparisons.

Since the performance difference between the two is small enough to be negligible in most situations, I'd prefer the Math.Max(a,b) because it's easier to read.

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1  
Do you have any references supporting the idea that functions can't be inlined across assembly boundaries? I'm reasonably sure that they can be. –  LukeH Mar 29 '11 at 22:57
1  
Probably pollution from NGEN limitations that were burned into my eyelids back in the .NET 1.0 days. It looks like some functions can be inlined across assembly boundaries now, particularly if they are property accessors or use value types. References: stackoverflow.com/questions/4660004/… and blogs.msdn.com/b/vancem/archive/2008/08/19/… and pcreview.co.uk/forums/… –  dthorpe Mar 29 '11 at 23:40
    
Answer updated. –  dthorpe Mar 29 '11 at 23:43
    
I did a quick simulation with a huge for loop using both approach and there was a performance difference between the two. Plus, looking at the IL, it seems Math.Max() doesnt get inlined. Is there any way to force or to suggest the compiler to inline certain functions? –  Benoittr Nov 30 '11 at 15:28
    
How are you looking at the IL? I'm pretty sure functions are not inlined when debugging, and not inlined when disassembled by ILDASM. And no, I don't know of any inline hint to coax the jit'er to inline a function. The .NET core folks I've heard/read talking about inlining were pretty adamant against inlining hints. Inlining is an internal optimization that is performed at the discretion of the JITer. –  dthorpe Nov 30 '11 at 18:20

I'd say it is quicker to understand what Math.Max is doing, and that should really be the only deciding factor here.

But as an indulgence, it's interesting to consider that Math.Max(a,b) evaluates the arguments once, whilst a > b ? a : b evaluates one of them twice. Not a problem with local variables, but for properties with side effects, the side effect may happen twice.

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if statement considered beneficial

Summary

a statement of the form if (a > max) max = a is the fastest way to determine the maximum of a set of numbers. However the loop infrastructure itself takes most of the CPU time, so this optimization is questionable in the end.

Details

The answer by luisperezphd is interesting because it provides numbers, however I believe the method is flawed: the compiler will most likely move the comparison out of the loop, so the answer doesn't measure what it wants to measure. This explains the negligible timing difference between control loop and measurement loops.

To avoid this loop optimization, I added an operation that depends on the loop variable, to the empty control loop as well as to all measurement loops. I simulate the common use case of finding the maximum in a list of numbers, and used three data sets:

  • best case: the first number is the maximum, all numbers after it are smaller
  • worst case: every number is bigger than the previous, so the max changes each iteration
  • average case: a set of random numbers

See below for the code.

The result was rather surprising to me. On my Core i5 2520M laptop I got the following for 1 billion iterations (the empty control took about 2.6 sec in all cases):

  • max = Math.Max(max, a): 2.0 sec best case / 1.3 sec worst case / 2.0 sec average case
  • max = Math.Max(a, max): 1.6 sec best case / 2.0 sec worst case / 1.5 sec average case
  • max = max > a ? max : a: 1.2 sec best case / 1.2 sec worst case / 1.2 sec average case
  • if (a > max) max = a: 0.2 sec best case / 0.9 sec worst case / 0.3 sec average case

So despite long CPU pipelines and the resulting penalties for branching, the good old if statement is the clear winner for all simulated data sets; in the best case it is 10 times faster than Math.Max, and in the worst case still more than 30% faster.

Another surprise is that the order of the arguments to Math.Max matters. Presumably this is because of CPU branch prediction logic working differently for the two cases, and mispredicting branches more or less depending on the order of arguments.

However, the majority of the CPU time is spent in the loop infrastructure, so in the end this optimization is questionable at best. It provides a measurable but minor reduction in overall execution time.

Code

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ProfileMathMax
{
  class Program
  {
    static double controlTotalSeconds;
    const int InnerLoopCount = 100000;
    const int OuterLoopCount = 1000000000 / InnerLoopCount;
    static int[] values = new int[InnerLoopCount];
    static int total = 0;

    static void ProfileBase()
    {
        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();
        int maxValue;
        for (int j = 0; j < OuterLoopCount; j++)
        {
            maxValue = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < InnerLoopCount; i++)
            {
                // baseline
                total += values[i];
            }
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        controlTotalSeconds = stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds;
        Console.WriteLine("Control - Empty Loop - " + controlTotalSeconds + " seconds");
    }

    static void ProfileMathMax()
    {
        int maxValue;
        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();
        for (int j = 0; j < OuterLoopCount; j++)
        {
            maxValue = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < InnerLoopCount; i++)
            {
                maxValue = Math.Max(values[i], maxValue);
                total += values[i];
            }
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Math.Max(a, max) - " + stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds + " seconds");
        Console.WriteLine("Relative: " + (stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds - controlTotalSeconds) + " seconds");
    }

    static void ProfileMathMaxReverse()
    {
        int maxValue;
        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();
        for (int j = 0; j < OuterLoopCount; j++)
        {
            maxValue = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < InnerLoopCount; i++)
            {
                maxValue = Math.Max(maxValue, values[i]);
                total += values[i];
            }
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Math.Max(max, a) - " + stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds + " seconds");
        Console.WriteLine("Relative: " + (stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds - controlTotalSeconds) + " seconds");
    }

    static void ProfileInline()
    {
        int maxValue = 0;
        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();
        for (int j = 0; j < OuterLoopCount; j++)
        {
            maxValue = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < InnerLoopCount; i++)
            {
                maxValue = maxValue > values[i] ? values[i] : maxValue;
                total += values[i];
            }
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("max = max > a ? a : max: " + stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds + " seconds");
        Console.WriteLine("Relative: " + (stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds - controlTotalSeconds) + " seconds");
    }

    static void ProfileIf()
    {
        int maxValue = 0;
        Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
        stopwatch.Start();
        for (int j = 0; j < OuterLoopCount; j++)
        {
            maxValue = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < InnerLoopCount; i++)
            {
                if (values[i] > maxValue)
                    maxValue = values[i];
                total += values[i];
            }
        }
        stopwatch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("if (a > max) max = a: " + stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds + " seconds");
        Console.WriteLine("Relative: " + (stopwatch.Elapsed.TotalSeconds - controlTotalSeconds) + " seconds");
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Random rnd = new Random();
        for (int i = 0; i < InnerLoopCount; i++)
        {
            //values[i] = i;  // worst case: every new number biggest than the previous
            //values[i] = i == 0 ? 1 : 0;  // best case: first number is the maximum
            values[i] = rnd.Next(int.MaxValue);  // average case: random numbers
        }

        ProfileBase();
        Console.WriteLine();
        ProfileMathMax();
        Console.WriteLine();
        ProfileMathMaxReverse();
        Console.WriteLine();
        ProfileInline();
        Console.WriteLine();
        ProfileIf();
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
  }
}
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Regarding performance, Modern CPUs have internal command pipeline such that every assembly command is executed in several internal steps. (e.g. fetching, interpretation, calculation, storage)

In most cases the CPU is smart enough to run these steps in parallel for sequential commands so the overall throughput is very high.

This is fine till there comes a branch (if, ?: etc.) . The branch may break the sequence and force the CPU to trash the pipeline. This costs a lot of clock cycles.

In theory, if the compiler is smart enough, the Math.Max can be implemented using a built it CPU command and the branching can be avoided.

In this case the Math.Max would actually be faster than the if - but it depends on the compiler..

In case of more complicated Max - like working on vectors, double []v; v.Max() the compiler can utilize highly optimized library code, that can be much faster than regular compiled code.

So it's best to go with Math.Max, but it is also recommended to check on your particular target system and compiler if it is important enough.

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