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Let S be a vector with unique elements, and s a subset of it, also with unique elements; e.g., S={1,2,3,4,5,6} and s={1,3,4,6}. Now given another vector c={7,8,9,7}, how can I create a vector C=[7,0,8,9,0,7], i.e., if S[[i]] is an element in s, then C[[i]] is equal to the element in c with the same index as S[[i]] in s, else zero.

What I have right now looks like

C=Array[0&,Length[S]];
j=1;
For[i=1,i<=Length[S],i++,If[MemberQ[s,S[[i]]],C[[i]]=c[[j]];j=j+1;]]; 

This works, but coming from a MATLAB background, I hate for loops and the above operation is a trivial indexing operation in matlab. I'm sure there is a smarter way to accomplish this, a la mathematica style. Does anyone have suggestions?

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1  
This is not related to the answers below, but C=Array[0&, ...] is better expressed as C = ConstantArray[0, Length[S]], and ten times faster to boot. –  Michael Pilat Mar 30 '11 at 4:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is faster than what has been posted so far:

ss = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6};   s = {1, 3, 4, 6};   c = {7, 8, 9, 7};

Replace[ss, Dispatch@Append[Thread[s -> c], _ -> 0], 1]
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1  
+1 for Replace and its last argument. Not sure whether Dispatch makes sense. Depends on the length of the list. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Mar 29 '11 at 23:43
    
@Sjoerd A quick test indicates it has little penalty on short lists, and is drastically faster with long lists. Why not include it? –  Mr.Wizard Mar 29 '11 at 23:50
1  
@d'o-o'b Sure, but you will need to read about Levelspec in Mathematica because it is used all over. Replace by default will match the entire expression (level 0) and then the pattern _ -> 0 will match, and the output will merely be 0. The same problem would happen with /. which is ReplaceAll, or replace at all levels. In this case I only want to match and replace the elements of the list ss, which is "level 1". Elements of those elements would be "level 2", for example. –  Mr.Wizard Mar 30 '11 at 0:10
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@d'o-o'b please read: reference.wolfram.com/mathematica/tutorial/… –  Mr.Wizard Mar 30 '11 at 0:15
2  
Just to further clarify the third argument in Replace[ ]: Replace[{1,1},_->2] returns 2, while Replace[{1,1},_->2,1] returns {2,2}. That is because in the first case the whole list matches, while in the second the matches are over the list elements. –  belisarius Mar 30 '11 at 0:39

You are replacing elements of S with either an element in c or with 0, so:

ss = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}
s = {1, 3, 4, 6}
c = {7, 8, 9, 7}
r = Append[MapThread[Rule, {s, c}], Rule[_, 0]]
answer = Map[Replace[#, r] &, ss]
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ss = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6};
s = {1, 3, 4, 6};
c = {7, 8, 9, 7};
ss /. Join[MapThread[Rule, {s, c}],Thread[Rule[Complement[ss, s], 0]]]

EDIT or:

answer = 0 ss; answer[[Position[ss, #, 1] & /@ s // Flatten]] = c;
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Here's one way. There are probably many others.

s = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6};
subS = {1, 3, 4, 6};
c = {7, 8, 9, 7};
d= s /. {x_Integer :> If[MemberQ[subS, x], c[[Position[subS, x][[1, 1]]]], 0]}

I used lower case variable names throughout as is customary for user-defined symbols.

Mathematica uses curly braces are used for vectors, lists, matrices, and tables.

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@d'o-o'b I made a minor modification to the original proposal: I eliminated Cases after realizing that it was in fact acting on every single element in s. –  David Carraher Mar 29 '11 at 23:23
 s = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6};
    subS = {1, 3, 4, 6};
    c = {7, 8, 9, 7};

How about?

If[MemberQ[subS, #], # /. MapThread[Rule, {subS, c}], 0] & /@ s

Output

{7, 0, 8, 9, 0, 7}

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Pardon me, but this method is the most inefficient one yet. –  Mr.Wizard Mar 30 '11 at 0:35

If S is always of the form {1, 2, ..., n}, (e.g., Range[n]) then this solution using SparseArray is about twice as fast as @Mr. Wizard's answer in my testing for very large lists:

Normal[SparseArray[Thread[s -> c], n, 0]]
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Can Position be incorporated into this approach? –  TomD Mar 30 '11 at 13:00
    
What is Position necessary for? –  Michael Pilat Mar 30 '11 at 13:28
    
I was thinking of the case where subS is an ordered subset of ss, but where the elements of ss are not necessarily ordered. Perhaps the OP implies otherwise? If, say, ssalt = {2, 4, 1, 5, 6, 3} and subSalt = {4, 1, 6, 3} then (for example) Replace[ssalt, Dispatch@Append[Thread[subSalt -> c], _ -> 0], 1] == Normal[SparseArray[ Thread[Flatten@Position[ssalt, #] & /@ subSalt -> c], 6, 0]]. (Is the assumption that subS is an ordered subset always justified? I suppose so) –  TomD Mar 30 '11 at 16:29
    
Ah, I see. Position is relatively slow compared to some of the alternatives in the answers to this question, and so in the scenario you describe I would expect the Replace/Dispatch technique of @Mr.Wizard to be faster. –  Michael Pilat Mar 30 '11 at 18:00
    
I do not think this is a reasonable assumption based on the original question. And if it is, isn't Normal@SparseArray[s -> c, n] sufficient? –  Mr.Wizard Mar 30 '11 at 21:06

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