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I am new to plotting graphs in R

I have 4 sets of values: y1, y2, y3, y4 and one set x. The y values are of different ranges, and I need to plot them as separate curves with separate sets of values on the y-axis.

To put it simple, I need 3 y-axes with different values (scales) for plotting on the same figure.

Any help appreciated, or tips on where to look. Steve

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I'm not clear on what you want exactly. Maybe it would help to include some ASCII art (or image) mockup of what it should look like. Also, you could have a look at the R graph gallery (addictedtor.free.fr/graphiques/RGraphGallery.php) to see which comes closest. –  phooji Mar 29 '11 at 22:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Try this out....

# The data have a common independent variable (x)
x <- 1:10

# Generate 4 different sets of outputs
y1 <- runif(10, 0, 1)
y2 <- runif(10, 100, 150)
y3 <- runif(10, 1000, 2000)
y4 <- runif(10, 40000, 50000)
y <- list(y1, y2, y3, y4)

# Colors for y[[2]], y[[3]], y[[4]] points and axes
colors = c("red", "blue", "green")

# Set the margins of the plot wider
par(oma = c(0, 2, 2, 3))

plot(x, y[[1]], yaxt = "n", xlab = "Common x-axis", main = "A bunch of plots on the same graph", 
     ylab = "")
lines(x, y[[1]])

# We use the "pretty" function go generate nice axes
axis(at = pretty(y[[1]]), side = 2)

# The side for the axes.  The next one will go on 
# the left, the following two on the right side
sides <- list(2, 4, 4) 

# The number of "lines" into the margin the axes will be
lines <- list(2, NA, 2)

for(i in 2:4) {
  par(new = TRUE)
  plot(x, y[[i]], axes = FALSE, col = colors[i - 1], xlab = "", ylab = "")
  axis(at = pretty(y[[i]]), side = sides[[i-1]], line = lines[[i-1]], 
      col = colors[i - 1])
  lines(x, y[[i]], col = colors[i - 1])
}

# Profit.

Plot Output

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Thanks Rguy, this is exactly what I was looking for –  Steve Mar 29 '11 at 23:52
1  
I'm impressed by the R-fu displayed here, but personally can't make heads or tails out of the resulting product. Maybe it would be more clear if there were different symbols used in addition to/replace of the colors. Or maybe it's just a product of the random data displayed...regardless - nice work! (+1) –  Chase Mar 30 '11 at 19:50
1  
@Chase I got this idea from someones blog a while ago, but I wish I had saved the link. I added lines to the plot connecting the points (just now). Actually, I'd have to say that the lines make it perfectly clear why the other answers are better in most cases. Plotting multiple graphs on the same plot can be misleading, and this would only be a good method if we had sets of outputs that increased/decreased in roughly the same fashion (i.e. Methane Gas and C02 in the environment is what i've used this sort of plot for). –  Rguy Mar 30 '11 at 21:20

If you want to go down the path of learning a plotting package beyond the base graphics, here's a solution with ggplot2 using the variables from @Rguy's answer:

library(ggplot2)
dat <- data.frame(x, y1, y2, y3, y4)

dat.m <- melt(dat, "x")

ggplot(dat.m, aes(x, value, colour = variable)) + geom_line() +
facet_wrap(~ variable, ncol = 1, scales = "free_y") +
scale_colour_discrete(legend = FALSE)

enter image description here

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This is a much more logical layout than the accepted answer for this kind of data, but it really depends on the specific problem that the OP has.. –  naught101 Jul 3 '12 at 2:12

Try the following. It's not as complicated as it looks. Once you watch the first graph being built, you'll see that the others are very similar. And, since there are four similar graphs, you could easily reconfigure the code into a function that is used over and over to draw each graph. However, since I commonly draw all sorts of graphs with the same x-axis, I need a LOT of flexibility. So, I've decided that it's easier to just copy/paste/modify the code for each graph.

#Generate the data for the four graphs
x <- seq(1, 50, 1)
y1 <- 10*rnorm(50)
y2 <- 100*rnorm(50)
y3 <- 1000*rnorm(50)
y4 <- 10000*rnorm(50)

#Set up the plot area so that multiple graphs can be crammed together
par(pty="m", plt=c(0.1, 1, 0, 1), omd=c(0.1,0.9,0.1,0.9))

#Set the area up for 4 plots
par(mfrow = c(4, 1))

#Plot the top graph with nothing in it =========================
plot(x, y1, xlim=range(x), type="n", xaxt="n", yaxt="n", main="", xlab="", ylab="")
mtext("Four Y Plots With the Same X", 3, line=1, cex=1.5)

#Store the x-axis data of the top plot so it can be used on the other graphs
pardat<-par()
xaxisdat<-seq(pardat$xaxp[1],pardat$xaxp[2],(pardat$xaxp[2]-pardat$xaxp[1])/pardat$xaxp[3])

#Get the y-axis data and add the lines and label
yaxisdat<-seq(pardat$yaxp[1],pardat$yaxp[2],(pardat$yaxp[2]-pardat$yaxp[1])/pardat$yaxp[3])
axis(2, at=yaxisdat, las=2, padj=0.5, cex.axis=0.8, hadj=0.5, tcl=-0.3)
abline(v=xaxisdat, col="lightgray")
abline(h=yaxisdat, col="lightgray")
mtext("y1", 2, line=2.3)
lines(x, y1, col="red")

#Plot the 2nd graph with nothing ================================
plot(x, y2, xlim=range(x), type="n", xaxt="n", yaxt="n", main="", xlab="", ylab="")

#Get the y-axis data and add the lines and label
pardat<-par()
yaxisdat<-seq(pardat$yaxp[1],pardat$yaxp[2],(pardat$yaxp[2]-pardat$yaxp[1])/pardat$yaxp[3])
axis(2, at=yaxisdat, las=2, padj=0.5, cex.axis=0.8, hadj=0.5, tcl=-0.3)
abline(v=xaxisdat, col="lightgray")
abline(h=yaxisdat, col="lightgray")
mtext("y2", 2, line=2.3)
lines(x, y2, col="blue")

#Plot the 3rd graph with nothing =================================
plot(x, y3, xlim=range(x), type="n", xaxt="n", yaxt="n", main="", xlab="", ylab="")

#Get the y-axis data and add the lines and label
pardat<-par()
yaxisdat<-seq(pardat$yaxp[1],pardat$yaxp[2],(pardat$yaxp[2]-pardat$yaxp[1])/pardat$yaxp[3])
axis(2, at=yaxisdat, las=2, padj=0.5, cex.axis=0.8, hadj=0.5, tcl=-0.3)
abline(v=xaxisdat, col="lightgray")
abline(h=yaxisdat, col="lightgray")
mtext("y3", 2, line=2.3)
lines(x, y3, col="green")

#Plot the 4th graph with nothing =================================
plot(x, y4, xlim=range(x), type="n", xaxt="n", yaxt="n", main="", xlab="", ylab="")

#Get the y-axis data and add the lines and label
pardat<-par()
yaxisdat<-seq(pardat$yaxp[1],pardat$yaxp[2],(pardat$yaxp[2]-pardat$yaxp[1])/pardat$yaxp[3])
axis(2, at=yaxisdat, las=2, padj=0.5, cex.axis=0.8, hadj=0.5, tcl=-0.3)
abline(v=xaxisdat, col="lightgray")
abline(h=yaxisdat, col="lightgray")
mtext("y4", 2, line=2.3)
lines(x, y4, col="darkgray")

#Plot the X axis =================================================
axis(1, at=xaxisdat, padj=-1.4, cex.axis=0.9, hadj=0.5, tcl=-0.3)
mtext("X Variable", 1, line=1.5)

Below is the plot of the four graphs.

enter image description here

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2  
+ 1 This is a great solution too. I might use this sometime. It's less misleading than putting all of the points on exactly the same graph. –  Rguy Mar 30 '11 at 0:25
1  
Great solution. Thanks. –  Steve Mar 30 '11 at 0:41

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