Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In the DllMain Entry Point documentation, the author makes the following comment:

To provide more complex initialization, create an initialization routine for the DLL. You can require applications to call the initialization routine before calling any other routines in the DLL.

In C/C++, how do I create a different routine and require the application to call it before any other?

share|improve this question
    
You require it by reminding the reader a few times in the documentation. Double-checking that it was done would be wise. But if that's possible then you can also lazy-initialize it. –  Hans Passant Mar 30 '11 at 0:19
    
Lazy-initialize may not be possible if the initialization takes parameters. –  David Heffernan Mar 30 '11 at 8:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The initialization routine can be any exported function. The trick is the "requiring other applications to call it". To enforce it, you would need to check if it had been called in pretty much every other exported function. If each exported function has some common prefix code, that would be a good place to check if the initialization function had been called.

If, though, you have to check if it has been called in every single entry point, it might be easier on the consumers of the DLL if you actually call that function automatically if it has not been called. That does require some additional work in making it thread safe most likely. You would need a critical section (or mutex, semaphore, etc.) to ensure that it was only called one time.

share|improve this answer

The canonical example of this is InitCommonControlsEx(). You have to make the users of your DLL call your initialization and finalization routines in just the same way.

share|improve this answer

Here's an example:

http://zone.ni.com/devzone/cda/tut/p/id/4877

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.