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How would you code this so that it adds up the first column, and then the second column?

Dim intSales(,) As Integer = {{100000, 150000}, _
                              {90000, 120000}, _
                              {75000, 210000}, _
                              {88000, 50000}, _
                              {125000, 220000}, _
                              {63000, 80000}}

For intColumn As Integer = 0 To intSales.GetUpperBound(1)
    For intRow As Integer = 0 To intSales.GetUpperBound(0)
        ' what do I put here?

    Next intRow
Next intColumn

Does this make sense? I'd be happy to clarify, if necessary.

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Is this homework? –  Pete Mar 29 '11 at 23:55
    
Yeah, why is it ok? –  Kurt Johnson Mar 30 '11 at 0:40
    
@Pete: Why so much ado about adding a completely useless homework tag, then not bother to correct the code formatting while you're at it? –  Cody Gray Mar 30 '11 at 5:21
1  
@Cody Gray I dunno? I could've sworn all his code was formatted at the time. Regardless, I don't have edit privledges only tags. And I asked if it was homework so I wouldn't give him the complete code and instead try to push him in the right direction. I don't understand what the problem is? –  Pete Mar 30 '11 at 5:25
    
@Pete: A "homework" tag doesn't add anything to the question. It's one of the dreaded "meta" tags that can't stand alone. It doesn't provide any useful information, either about the language or the specific task being asked about. Adding a homework tag is not important. Making the code readable, however, is quite important. The code wasn't properly formatted when you made the tag edit, and even without privileges, you can still suggest an edit. My point was only that such is far more important than adding a homework tag. A good homework question is indistinguishable from any other question. –  Cody Gray Mar 31 '11 at 5:01

3 Answers 3

Map out your values and think about it then come back with some sample code if you still need help. To get your started I will say that the first arrays index will be your "row". The second arrays index will be your "column" in that row. So you could access 120000(second row, second column) with something like intSales[1][1] (remember, array indexes are zero based).

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For intColumn As Integer = 0 To intSales.GetUpperBound(1) For intRow As Integer = 0 To intSales.GetUpperBound(0) Next intRow Next intColumn –  Kurt Johnson Mar 30 '11 at 0:22
    
@Kurt Johnson What do you want me to do with your comment? I was trying to help you arrive at the solution yourself but someone else already posted code so you should be good to go provided their code works. –  Pete Mar 30 '11 at 0:24
    
No i have to do it in a different way than that. –  Kurt Johnson Mar 30 '11 at 0:26
    
@kurt johnson I lost you. Can you explain what you have to do a little better? –  Pete Mar 30 '11 at 0:31
    
I added something to my original post. What do you think about it? –  Kurt Johnson Mar 30 '11 at 0:39
    Dim s0 As Integer = 0
    Dim s1 As Integer = 0
    For i As Integer = 0 To intSales.GetLength(0) - 1
        s0 += intSales(i, 0)
        s1 += intSales(i, 1)
    Next
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i think i have to do it a different way. ha –  Kurt Johnson Mar 30 '11 at 0:51
    
yeah i'm dumb it should be like this –  Kurt Johnson Mar 30 '11 at 1:00

You're already on the right track by creating two nested for loops. You will need to loop through the inner array for each loop of the outside array.

I think the primary thing you're missing is that you'll need to create a temporary variable outside of the for loops to hold the summation value(s). For example, I'm declaring sumTotal as an Integer:

Dim intSales(,) As Integer = {{100000, 150000}, _
                              {90000, 120000}, _
                              {75000, 210000}, _
                              {88000, 50000}, _
                              {125000, 220000}, _
                              {63000, 80000}}

' Declare a temporary variable to hold the sum as you loop
Dim sumTotal As Integer = 0    

For intColumn As Integer = 0 To intSales.GetUpperBound(1)
    For intRow As Integer = 0 To intSales.GetUpperBound(0)
        ' Add the value at this specific point in the array
        '  to the existing value of the sumTotal variable
        sumTotal += intSales(intRow, intColumn)
    Next intRow
Next intColumn

Notice that I'm using the special "plus-equal-to" (+=) operator here. You may not have learned about that yet, but it's equivalent to the following code, just a little easier to read:

sumTotal = sumTotal + intSales(intRow, intColumn)

Running that code puts a value of 1,371,000 in the sumTotal variable, which I suppose is correct. ;-)


It's been suggested that perhaps you wanted to obtain an individual result for each column of the array. In that case, you'll need to declare two temporary variables, one for each column. Then, you'll want to loop through each element in the rows of the first column, totaling the values as shown above into the first temporary variable. To obtain the results of the second column, you'll simply loop through each element in the rows of that column, summing the values just as you did for the first column.

This is merely a variation on a theme—once you understand how to loop through arrays, and sum values into a temporary variable, you have sufficient information to tackle this easily.


The only thing I would add is purely stylistic: The coding guidelines for VB.NET generally recommend against prefixing your variable names with type identifiers. In this case, you've used int to indicate that a variable is of type Integer.

The thing is, though, Visual Studio already gives you that information in a tooltip when you hover your mouse over the variable, and VB.NET's compiler is smart enough to throw up an error if you try to assign a value of one type to a value of a different, incompatible type. Adding the type information to the name of the variable doesn't actually give you any additional information, and it just clutters up the names, making things harder to read.

This was a recommended practice under earlier, incompatible versions of Visual Basic (back in 1998), but it's been changed to keep up with the modern evolution of the language. You're certainly free to ignore it, if you prefer, as this is purely stylistic advice that won't affect how your program runs, but I just thought I'd make the suggestion before someone else leaves you a nasty comment.

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This method does not produce the desired result. The OP stated that he needed to get the sum of the first column and the second, so there should be two results, not just a single grand total for all array elements. –  Chris Dunaway Mar 30 '11 at 17:39
    
@Chris: Obviously I disagree with your interpretation of the question. It should go without saying that I did indeed read the question before taking the time to answer. Nowhere does it say explicitly that two different results are desired for each column. The title asks explicitly to sum elements in a 2D array—singular. The first line of the question certainly doesn't imply that there have to be two different results. It's perfectly valid to add up the first column, then the second, and get one result. Your downvote is not appreciated, although your difference of interpretation is noted. –  Cody Gray Mar 31 '11 at 4:57
    
I only downvoted because I felt the answer did not address the OP questions. The OP asked: "How would you code this so that it adds up the first column, and then the second column". To me that implies 2 operations. But I can see how it could be interpreted otherwise. Downvote removed. –  Chris Dunaway Mar 31 '11 at 13:11

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