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Below is a simple start for a driver based cache class in PHP. Another user submitted it...

<?php
class Cache
{
    protected $Driver;
    public function __construct($driver)
    {
        require_once 'drivers/' . $drivers . '.driver.php';
        $driver = "Cache_Driver_" . $driver;

        $this->Driver = new $driver;
    }


    public function create($key,$value)
    {
        return $this->Driver->create($key,$value);
    }

    public function read($key,$value)
    {
        return $this->Driver->read($key,$value);
    }

    public function update($key,$value)
    {
         return $this->Driver->update($key,$value);
    }

    public function remove($key)
    {
        return $this->Driver->remove($key);
    }
}

?>

My plan is to have separate class "files/drivers" for each method of caching I will have in my app. So far I plan on using,

- File
- APC
- Memcache or Memcached
- Redis
- Sessions
- Cookies

So my main question(#1) here, I realize that sessions and cookies are not usually considered part of the caching but I think that they would fit in here, not to really "cache" a lot of data but more as a way to get/set my sessions and cookies, instead of having specific sessions and cookie classes, they would utilize my get/set/unset methods from this class.

Please tell me what you think about this idea? Good, bad, any suggetions? Thank you!

question(#2) nFor my class that will be for sessions, I was thinking, in my constructor for the session Driver class, I could call

session_start()

there. Possible problem, wouldn't this require that I initiate the cache with session driver right away, like at the top of my application before anything else is called? Or even worse, would have to call session_start() outside of the class itself, at the top of my application? Again looking for suggetions, I feel I am overlooking something, thanks again for any help.

<?php  
$cache = new Cache('Session');
?>
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1  
The most obvious issue with sessions and cookies is impossibility to invalidate cache entry. –  zerkms Mar 30 '11 at 0:44
    
Sessions also aren't very durable. By default, sessions are purged at least once an hour. Also, crawlers like googlebot will generate a new session for every single page they request. And if you ever have more than one web front end for your application, you'll have to deal with moving sessions to shared storage, or do load balancing based on session. –  Frank Farmer Mar 30 '11 at 1:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I realize that sessions and cookies are not usually considered part of the caching but I think that they would fit in here, not to really "cache" a lot of data but more as a way to get/set my sessions and cookies, instead of having specific sessions and cookie classes, they would utilize my get/set/unset methods from this class.

PHP has perfectly adequate ways to deal with cookies and sessions. They're called $_COOKIE/setcookie and $_SESSION. You don't need a wrapper for these that is designed for another purpose, even if the interface is adequate on the surface. For example, cookies have extra things that you have to worry about, like domain names and expiration times, while sessions won't. Maybe your cached data will expire, but then how will you manage that expiration information in the session?

If you want to wrap them, wrap them, but don't wedge them into an interface designed for another purpose.

wouldn't this require that I initiate the cache with session driver right away, like at the top of my application before anything else is called?

Not necessarily. session_id() returns an empty string when the session has not yet been started, at least at the interactive prompt. You can use this to detect if you need to start a session.

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cookies

There are a number of limitations to data storage in cookies that are going to make them less than ideal as a caching solution and probably not worth the effort:

  • Cookies are limited in number and size per domain. For example in IE, each cookie is limited to 4kb and a there can be a maximum of 20 cookies per domain.
  • Cookies get sent to the server with every request. If you are storing 80kb of data in cookies that will make every request (including requests that are for non-dynamic resources on the same host) quite large.
  • Cookies are per-user (see below)

$_SESSION

Caching data in the $_SESSION is much more reasonable since the only increase in back-and-forth traffic is the single small session-id cookie header. The big downside with caching in the $_SESSION array is that the session-data is separate for each client. With your other caching back-ends (APC, Memcache, etc), data is shared and available for requests from every client. The issue this raises is that with per-client session caches, there is no easy way to clear or update a value from other clients' session-data, resulting in stale caches.

Conclusion

While per-client caches are reasonable things generally, the difference in operation model between them and the other shared-storage cache back-ends you mention (APC, memcache, etc) mean that many applications that are expecting a shared-storage cache will likely break when presented with a per-client cache. Both types of cache have their place, but confusing which type is being used can be a recipe for problems.

Personally, I would skip session data and cookies as caching backends unless you specifically are building a per-client caching system. In that case I would skip on cookies and just implement session storage.

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PHP already supports different backends for managing sessions. Don't create your own wrappers, the PHP session is already a wrapper. You can configure PHP to use files (default), mysql, memcache or a number of other methods.

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He asked about general caching layer, not about session storage. –  zerkms Mar 30 '11 at 0:57

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