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cookie set: (id, alias)

setcookie("id",$data['id'], time()+3600*24*30);
setcookie("alias",$this->nombre, time()+3600*24*30);

cookies unset? (id, alias)

setcookie("id","-1",time()-315360000);
setcookie("alias","",time()-315360000);
unset($_COOKIE['id']);       // additional, but still no..
unset($_COOKIE['alias']);    //    "            "

What i am doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
unset() unsets PHP variables; setcookie() is a header directive for sending a small text packet to the browser. –  Jared Farrish Mar 30 '11 at 0:53
1  
Are they sent from the same domain and directory? You're not setting a domain and directory explicitly, so that could be the source of the problem. –  Yahel Mar 30 '11 at 1:15
    
that was it, we had a long chat in the first answer, thanks a lot –  Toni Michel Caubet Mar 30 '11 at 16:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using your example, I created this test:

<?php

ob_start();

echo '<pre>';

setcookie("id","0001", time()+3600*24*30);
setcookie("alias","name", time()+3600*24*30);

print_r($_COOKIE);

if ($_COOKIE['id'] || $_COOKIE['alias']) {
    setcookie("id","-1",time()-315360000);
    setcookie("alias","",time()-315360000);
}

print_r($_COOKIE);

ob_end_flush();

?>

On the first load, it outputs:

Array
(
)
Array
(
)

On reload:

Array
(
    [id] => 0001
    [alias] => name
)
Array
(
    [id] => 0001
    [alias] => name
)

On second reload:

Array
(
)
Array
(
)

So it appears your code is resetting the cookie on the roundtrip.

EDIT

The following:

<?php

ob_start();

echo '<pre>';

setcookie("id","0001", time()+3600*24*30);
setcookie("alias","name", time()+3600*24*30);

print_r($_COOKIE);

if ($_COOKIE['id'] || $_COOKIE['alias']) {
    setcookie("id","-1",time()-315360000);
    setcookie("alias","",time()-315360000);
    unset($_COOKIE['id']);
    unset($_COOKIE['alias']);
}

print_r($_COOKIE);

ob_end_flush();

?>

Will either print:

Array
(
)
Array
(
)

Or will print:

Array
(
    [id] => 0001
    [alias] => name
)
Array
(
)

http://jfcoder.com/test/cookies.php (hit reload a few times)

If you need to tell the browser to forget the cookie, use setcookie() with the time set back in time (I use at least 24 hours). If you need the $_COOKIES array to forget the value, use unset().

EDIT

There are two possible issues contributing here, one a subdomain mismatch on the cookie, and a path accessibility problem.

For instance...

If the url the visitor accessed was on a directory different from where the url that attempts to reset the cookie, you need to set the cookie with a path that will allow that cookie to be accessed (and reset) by other paths.

setcookie('my', 'cookie', time()+3600, '/');

Or to allow for paths contained within a subdirectory...

setcookie('my', 'cookie', time()+3600, '/my/path/');

If the url the visitor accessed was a subdomain (including www), but you want the cookie to be accessible to all subdomains, you need to give a wildcard to setcookie.

setcookie('my', 'cookie', time()+3600, '/', '.example.com');

Will allow urls from www.example.com, my.example.com, and sub.example.com to access and reset the cookie. Obviously, at this point too your path considerations need to be taken into account, since for a subdomain argument, you will need to include a path. / selects all subdirectories on the url, and . before the domain selects subdomains (although sub.sub.domains, I'm not sure).

http://php.net/manual/en/function.setcookie.php

share|improve this answer
    
If you've only just sent the headers, it won't appear in the $_COOKIE array, since that's a request array. Only on subsequent loads will that $_COOKIE array be set. –  Yahel Mar 30 '11 at 1:14
    
Of course (see my comment below the question). I'm thinking the OP is not considering the roundtrip, and is not understanding what unset does. Or are you getting at something else? –  Jared Farrish Mar 30 '11 at 1:16
    
i think i understand you, but i don't know what to do next... :? –  Toni Michel Caubet Mar 30 '11 at 1:18
    
If you're trying to cancel out the cookie on the browser, your setcookie() is going to accomplish that. If you need to unset the cookie during the same request, use unset to affect the local $_COOKIE array. –  Jared Farrish Mar 30 '11 at 1:21
    
See my edit for adding unset(). –  Jared Farrish Mar 30 '11 at 1:24

How about setting the time to an hour back, rather than that large number?

setcookie("alias", "", time()-3600);
share|improve this answer
    
this is how I always have done it, everything I've ever read has used an hour as the end all be all of what to set it back by –  Greg Flynn Mar 30 '11 at 0:58
    
I don't think this is any different from the setcookie() example the OP uses in the question, where the time is put back ten years, and there's anything magic about one hour (especially when a time zone change could obviate that). –  Jared Farrish Mar 30 '11 at 1:08
1  
There's nothing wrong with the 'very large number'; it coincides with a decade, which PHP should be able to handle just fine. –  Yahel Mar 30 '11 at 1:22

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