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How I can sort array data alphanumerically in ruby?

Suppose my array is a = [test_0_1, test_0_2, test_0_3, test_0_4, test_0_5, test_0_6, test_0_7, test_0_8, test_0_9, test_1_0, test_1_1, test_1_2, test_1_3, test_1_4, test_1_5, test_1_6, test_1_7, test_1_8, test_1_9, test_1_10, test_1_11, test_1_12, test_1_13, test_1_14, ...........test_1_121...............]

I want my output to be:

.
.
.
test_1_121
.
.
.
test_1_14
test_1_13
test_1_12
test_1_11
test_1_10
test_1_9
test_1_8
test_1_7
test_1_6
test_1_5
test_1_4
test_1_3
test_1_2
test_1_1
test_0_10
test_0_9
test_0_8
test_0_7
test_0_6
test_0_5
test_0_4
test_0_3
test_0_2
test_0_1
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Because the sort required for this isn't a straightforward comparison of two values, you'll want to use sort_by. Overhead induced by manipulating strings, or diving into objects, can kill sort. –  the Tin Man Mar 30 '11 at 5:03

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can pass a block to the sort function to custom sort it. In your case you will have a problem because your numbers aren't zero padded, so this method zero pads the numerical parts, then sorts them, resulting in your desired sort order.

a.sort { |a,b|
  ap = a.split('_')
  a = ap[0] + "%05d" % ap[1] + "%05d" % ap[2]
  bp = b.split('_')
  b = bp[0] + "%05d" % bp[1] + "%05d" % bp[2]
  b <=> a
}
share|improve this answer

A generic algorithm for sorting strings that contain non-padded sequence numbers at arbitrary positions.

padding = 4
list.sort{|a,b|
  a,b = [a,b].map{|s| s.gsub(/\d+/){|m| "0"*(padding - m.size) + m } }
  a<=>b
}

where padding is the field length you want the numbers to have during comparison. Any number found in a string will be zero padded before comparison if it consists of less than "padding" number of digits, which yields the expected sorting order.

To yield the result asked for by the user682932, simply add .reverse after the sort block, which will flip the natural ordering (ascending) into a descending order.

With a pre-loop over the strings you can of course dynamically find the maximum number of digits in the list of strings, which you can use instead of hard-coding some arbitrary padding length, but that would require more processing (slower) and a bit more code. E.g.

padding = list.reduce(0){|max,s| 
  x = s.scan(/\d+/).map{|m|m.size}.max
  (x||0) > max ? x : max
}
share|improve this answer

If you simply sort as string, you will not get the correct ordering between 'test_2' and 'test_10', for example. So do:

sort_by{|s| s.scan(/\d+/).map{|s| s.to_i}}.reverse
share|improve this answer

Sort routines can have greatly varying processing times. Benchmarking variations of the sort can quickly home in on the fastest way to do things:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

ary = %w[
    test_0_1  test_0_2   test_0_3 test_0_4 test_0_5  test_0_6  test_0_7
    test_0_8  test_0_9   test_1_0 test_1_1 test_1_2  test_1_3  test_1_4  test_1_5
    test_1_6  test_1_7   test_1_8 test_1_9 test_1_10 test_1_11 test_1_12 test_1_13
    test_1_14 test_1_121
]

require 'ap'
ap ary.sort_by { |v| a,b,c = v.split(/_+/); [a, b.to_i, c.to_i] }.reverse

And its output:

>> [
>>     [ 0] "test_1_121",
>>     [ 1] "test_1_14",
>>     [ 2] "test_1_13",
>>     [ 3] "test_1_12",
>>     [ 4] "test_1_11",
>>     [ 5] "test_1_10",
>>     [ 6] "test_1_9",
>>     [ 7] "test_1_8",
>>     [ 8] "test_1_7",
>>     [ 9] "test_1_6",
>>     [10] "test_1_5",
>>     [11] "test_1_4",
>>     [12] "test_1_3",
>>     [13] "test_1_2",
>>     [14] "test_1_1",
>>     [15] "test_1_0",
>>     [16] "test_0_9",
>>     [17] "test_0_8",
>>     [18] "test_0_7",
>>     [19] "test_0_6",
>>     [20] "test_0_5",
>>     [21] "test_0_4",
>>     [22] "test_0_3",
>>     [23] "test_0_2",
>>     [24] "test_0_1"
>> ]

Testing the algorithms for speed shows:

require 'benchmark'

n = 50_000
Benchmark.bm(8) do |x|
  x.report('sort1') { n.times { ary.sort { |a,b| b <=> a }         } }
  x.report('sort2') { n.times { ary.sort { |a,b| a <=> b }.reverse } }
  x.report('sort3') { n.times { ary.sort { |a,b|
                                  ap = a.split('_')
                                  a = ap[0] + "%05d" % ap[1] + "%05d" % ap[2]
                                  bp = b.split('_')
                                  b = bp[0] + "%05d" % bp[1] + "%05d" % bp[2]
                                  b <=> a
                                } } }

  x.report('sort_by1') { n.times { ary.sort_by { |s| s                                               }         } }
  x.report('sort_by2') { n.times { ary.sort_by { |s| s                                               }.reverse } }
  x.report('sort_by3') { n.times { ary.sort_by { |s| s.scan(/\d+/).map{ |s| s.to_i }                 }.reverse } }
  x.report('sort_by4') { n.times { ary.sort_by { |v| a = v.split(/_+/); [a[0], a[1].to_i, a[2].to_i] }.reverse } }
  x.report('sort_by5') { n.times { ary.sort_by { |v| a,b,c = v.split(/_+/); [a, b.to_i, c.to_i]      }.reverse } }
end


>>               user     system      total        real
>> sort1     0.900000   0.010000   0.910000 (  0.919115)
>> sort2     0.880000   0.000000   0.880000 (  0.893920)
>> sort3    43.840000   0.070000  43.910000 ( 45.970928)
>> sort_by1  0.870000   0.010000   0.880000 (  1.077598)
>> sort_by2  0.820000   0.000000   0.820000 (  0.858309)
>> sort_by3  7.060000   0.020000   7.080000 (  7.623183)
>> sort_by4  6.800000   0.000000   6.800000 (  6.827472)
>> sort_by5  6.730000   0.000000   6.730000 (  6.762403)
>> 

Sort1 and sort2 and sort_by1 and sort_by2 help establish baselines for sort, sort_by and both of those with reverse.

Sorts sort3 and sort_by3 are two other answers on this page. Sort_by4 and sort_by5 are two spins on how I'd do it, with sort_by5 being the fastest I came up with after a few minutes of tinkering.

This shows how minor differences in the algorithm can make a difference in the final output. If there were more iterations, or larger arrays being sorted the differences would be more extreme.

share|improve this answer

Similar to @ctcherry answer, but faster:

a.sort_by {|s| "%s%05i%05i" % s.split('_') }.reverse

EDIT: My tests:

require 'benchmark'
ary = []
100_000.times { ary << "test_#{rand(1000)}_#{rand(1000)}" }
ary.uniq!; puts "Size: #{ary.size}"

Benchmark.bm(5) do |x|
  x.report("sort1") do
    ary.sort_by {|e| "%s%05i%05i" % e.split('_') }.reverse
  end
  x.report("sort2") do
    ary.sort { |a,b|
      ap = a.split('_')
      a = ap[0] + "%05d" % ap[1] + "%05d" % ap[2]
      bp = b.split('_')
      b = bp[0] + "%05d" % bp[1] + "%05d" % bp[2]
      b <=> a
    } 
  end
  x.report("sort3") do
    ary.sort_by { |v| a, b, c = v.split(/_+/); [a, b.to_i, c.to_i] }.reverse
  end
end

Output:

Size: 95166

           user     system      total        real
sort1  3.401000   0.000000   3.401000 (  3.394194)
sort2 94.880000   0.624000  95.504000 ( 95.722475)
sort3  3.494000   0.000000   3.494000 (  3.501201)
share|improve this answer
    
Why not show your tests? Benchmark results are very useful when explaining why something is faster. –  the Tin Man Mar 30 '11 at 5:01

From the looks of it, you want to use the sort function and/or the reverse function.

ruby-1.9.2-p136 :009 > a = ["abc_1", "abc_11", "abc_2", "abc_3", "abc_22"]
 => ["abc_1", "abc_11", "abc_2", "abc_3", "abc_22"] 

ruby-1.9.2-p136 :010 > a.sort
 => ["abc_1", "abc_11", "abc_2", "abc_22", "abc_3"] 
ruby-1.9.2-p136 :011 > a.sort.reverse
 => ["abc_3", "abc_22", "abc_2", "abc_11", "abc_1"] 
share|improve this answer
    
Try this with a = [test_0_1, test_0_2, test_0_3, test_0_4, test_0_5, test_0_6, test_0_7, test_0_8, test_0_9, test_1_0, test_1_1, test_1_2, test_1_3, test_1_4, test_1_5, test_1_6, test_1_7, test_1_8, test_1_9, test_1_10, test_1_11, test_1_12, test_1_13, test_1_14, ...........test_1_121...............] having two underscores. It doesn't work. –  user682932 Mar 30 '11 at 1:18

Ok, from your output , it seems like you just want it to reverse, so use reverse()

a.reverse
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