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I have a function that creates a local List<object> where the object is an anonymous type. I need to return these results in Dictionary<string, SortedList<DateTime, double>>.

The data is the the list looks like this.

{ Security = "6752 JT", Date = {1/17/2011 12:00:00 AM}, zScore = 1 }
{ Security = "6753 JT", Date = {1/17/2011 12:00:00 AM}, zScore = 2 }
{ Security = "6754 JT", Date = {1/17/2011 12:00:00 AM}, zScore = 3 }
{ Security = "6752 JT", Date = {1/18/2011 12:00:00 AM}, zScore = 1 }
{ Security = "6753 JT", Date = {1/18/2011 12:00:00 AM}, zScore = 2 }
{ Security = "6754 JT", Date = {1/18/2011 12:00:00 AM}, zScore = 3 }
{ Security = "6752 JT", Date = {1/19/2011 12:00:00 AM}, zScore = 1 }
{ Security = "6753 JT", Date = {1/19/2011 12:00:00 AM}, zScore = 2 }
{ Security = "6754 JT", Date = {1/19/2011 12:00:00 AM}, zScore = 3 }

I would like to use LINQ to place these results into a Dictionary<string, SortedList<DateTime, double>> where the dictionary's key is the Security, and the value is a SortedList containing all the date/z-score values for the security.

I can do this in LINQ when it is a custom object, but how do you do it with an anonymous type object?

Note: This query was originally posted in an unnecessarily complicated, and poorly phrased way. Which is probably why no one answered it! I'm including the link in case you wanted to see why the output is in this form.
C# LINQ Z-Score query output to a Dictionary<string, SortedList<DateTime, double>>

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'I can do this in LINQ when it is a custom object, but how do you do it with an anonymous type object?' It would be the same way? –  PostMan Mar 30 '11 at 1:20
    
Do you mean to say that you have a function which returns anonymous types as objects because they type cannot be exposed? If so, then I would strongly suggest created a named type anytime results are being passed from one function to another. –  Chris Pitman Mar 30 '11 at 1:21
1  
I think that you are looking for a way to cast back to an anonymous type and have the properties available? See stackoverflow.com/questions/1409734/c-cast-to-anonymous-type for more information on that. –  Elian Ebbing Mar 30 '11 at 1:24
1  
If you have to use the anonymous type in several methods, I'd recommend making a named type / class from it and pass the results strongly typed - anything else is just a workaround for a bad design –  BrokenGlass Mar 30 '11 at 1:26
    
@Elian Yes, that is the problem. The properties aren't available to query –  Andre P. Mar 30 '11 at 1:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

So basically you're asking how to unbox an anonymous type from object?

First of all, I recommend not using a List<object> and just ... creating a custom class.

public class SecurityScore {
    public string Security { get; set; }
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
    public int ZScore { get; set; }
}

However, if for whatever reason you need to do this, try this approach from Jon Skeet:

I've always known that it's perfectly easy to return an instance of an anonymous type by declaring that the method will return object. However, it hadn't occurred to me before today that you can actually cast back to that type afterwards. Of course, you can't just use a normal cast expression - that requires the name of the type to be known at compile-time. But you can do a cast in a generic method... and you can use type inference to supply a type argument... and two anonymous type instance creation expressions will use the same type within the same assembly if the order, names and types of the properties are the same.

If you want to explore his solution, check out his blog post on the subject.

For completeness, I will post his code here:

static class GrottyHacks
{
    internal static T Cast<T>(object target, T example)
    {
        return (T) target;
    }
}

class CheesecakeFactory
{
    static object CreateCheesecake()
    {
        return new { Fruit="Strawberry", Topping="Chocolate" };
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        object weaklyTyped = CreateCheesecake();
        var stronglyTyped = GrottyHacks.Cast(weaklyTyped,
            new { Fruit="", Topping="" });

        Console.WriteLine("Cheesecake: {0} ({1})",
            stronglyTyped.Fruit, stronglyTyped.Topping);            
    }
}

I must admit that, while I don't really like the idea of boxing/unboxing an anonymous type, his approach is pretty awesome, and takes up relatively few lines of code.

So, now that I've given you a possible solution, I must ask -- why are you doing it this way, as opposed to creating a simple class?

Edit: Also for completeness, here's how I would implement your particular problem using Jon Skeet's solution:

void Main()
{
    // Create a list of (boxed) anonymous objects
    var securitiesBoxed = new List<object>() {
        new { Security = "6752 JT", Date = DateTime.Parse("1/17/2011 12:00:00 AM"), zScore = 1 },
        new { Security = "6753 JT", Date = DateTime.Parse("1/17/2011 12:00:00 AM"), zScore = 2 },
        new { Security = "6754 JT", Date = DateTime.Parse("1/17/2011 12:00:00 AM"), zScore = 3 },
        new { Security = "6752 JT", Date = DateTime.Parse("1/18/2011 12:00:00 AM"), zScore = 1 },
        new { Security = "6753 JT", Date = DateTime.Parse("1/18/2011 12:00:00 AM"), zScore = 2 },
        new { Security = "6754 JT", Date = DateTime.Parse("1/18/2011 12:00:00 AM"), zScore = 3 },
        new { Security = "6752 JT", Date = DateTime.Parse("1/19/2011 12:00:00 AM"), zScore = 1 },
        new { Security = "6753 JT", Date = DateTime.Parse("1/19/2011 12:00:00 AM"), zScore = 2 },
        new { Security = "6754 JT", Date = DateTime.Parse("1/19/2011 12:00:00 AM"), zScore = 3 }
    };

    // Now, to convert to a Dictionary<string, SortedList<DateTime, double>>...
    var securitiesUnboxed = securitiesBoxed.Select(x => Cast(x, new { Security = "", Date = new DateTime(), zScore = 0 }))
        .GroupBy(x => x.Security)
        .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.OrderBy(y => y.Date));
}

// This is the static method that will cast our anonymous type
internal static T Cast<T>(object target, T example)
{
    return (T) target;
}

In LINQPad, the above code results in the following data:

linqified data

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Thank you for this fruitful response. "....why are you doing it this way, as opposed to creating a simple class?...." I asked myself this same question. At the time, I thought that t is an intermediate step and that I would format the results after finishing the processing. In retrospect, it seems that was a silly idea. Two easier solution are to created a custom class, or to just add the individual results to a dictionary as iterate through the calculation. –  Andre P. Mar 30 '11 at 2:20
    
I have to say that Jon's solution is VERY nice. Thanks for pointing this out. –  Andre P. Mar 30 '11 at 2:28
    
@Andre - Glad it helped! Don't worry -- I've had plenty of those d'oh moments! Just look at my question history -- think at one point I asked how to reverse a Dictionary (Dictionaries have no order) - but this is how we learn ;-) And you're right, Jon's solution is really cool! –  Pandincus Mar 30 '11 at 2:34
    
+1 detailed answer. I posted an alternate solution using dynamic - useful when .NET 4.0 is an option. –  Ahmad Mageed Mar 30 '11 at 2:54

Pandincus gave one possible solution in his answer. Another solution with a smaller footprint is available to you if you're using .NET 4.0 and can take advantage of the dynamic type:

// list is a List<object>
var query = list.Cast<dynamic>()
                .GroupBy(o => o.Security)
                .ToDictionary(o => o.Key,
                    o => new SortedList<DateTime, double>(o.ToDictionary(x => (DateTime)x.Date, x => (double)x.zScore)));

foreach (var item in query)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Security: " + item.Key);
    foreach (var kvp in item.Value)
        Console.WriteLine("Date: {0}, zScore: {1}", kvp.Key, kvp.Value);
}

This still feels hackish and ideally, since you're generating the result, you should avoid this mess by rethinking your approach and avoid adding the items to a List<object>. It looks like you have done just that in your answer to your original question!

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Using dynamic with .NET 4.0 is a great idea -- I completely missed it! –  Pandincus Mar 30 '11 at 3:08
    
@Ahmed Thanks for this solution. I haven't made use of 4.0 yet as the target for this is 3.5, but it does look interesting. –  Andre P. Mar 30 '11 at 8:42

This is not tested.

 Dictionary<string, SortedList<DateTime, double>> dict = yourList.ToDictionary(kv => kv.Security , kv => new KeyValuePair(kv.Date, kv.zScore));

Edit based on comments below, you could try List< SomeType > instead of List< object >

class SomeType
{
    public string Security {get;set;}
    public DateTime Date {get;set;}
    public int zScore {get;set;}
}

var results = new List<SomeType>(); 
results.Add(new { Security = secRank.Symbol, Date = sec.First().Date, zScore = zScore });
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the response. This is the type of answer I was looking for, but it is generating the same error my own version does. Namely,'object' does not contain a definition for 'Security' and no extension method 'Security' accepting a first argument of type 'object' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) –  Andre P. Mar 30 '11 at 1:48
    
could you post the code how you are retriving your list? I mean list of anonymous type list? –  Sanjeevakumar Hiremath Mar 30 '11 at 1:51
    
The function creates a list var results = new List<object>(); then populates in this line results.Add(new { Security = secRank.Symbol, Date = sec.First().Date, zScore = zScore }); –  Andre P. Mar 30 '11 at 1:55

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