Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm wondering if mutexes/locks are required for data access within Node.js. For example, lets say I've created a simple server. The server provides a couple protocol methods to add to and remove from an internal array. Do I need to protect the internal array with some type of mutex?

I understand Javascript (and thus Node.js) is single threaded. I'm just not clear on how events are handled. Do events interrupt? If that is the case, my app could be in the middle of reading the array, get interrupted to run an event callback which changes the array, and then continue processing the array which has now been changed by the event callback.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I'm wondering if mutexes/locks are required for data access within Node.js.

Nope! Events are handled the moment there's no other code to run, this means there will be no contention, as only the currently running code has access to that internal array. As a side-effect of node being single-threaded, long computations will block all other events until the computation is done.

I understand Javascript (and thus Node.js) is single threaded. I'm just not clear on how events are handled. Do events interrupt?

Nope, events are not interrupted. For example, if you put a while(true){} into your code, it would stop any other code from being executed, because there is always another iteration of the loop to be run.

If you have a long-running computation, it is a good idea to use process.nextTick, as this will allow it to be run when nothing else is running (I'm fuzzy on this: the example below shows that I'm probably right about it running uninterrupted, probably).

If you have any other questions, feel free to stop into #node.js and ask questions. Also, I asked a couple people to look at this and make sure I'm not totally wrong ;)

var count = 0;

var numIterations = 100;
while(numIterations--) {
  process.nextTick(function() {
    count = count + 1;
  });
}

setTimeout(function() {

  console.log(count);

}, 2);

//
//=> 100
//

Thanks to AAA_awright of #node.js :)

share|improve this answer
1  
my reading of the node.js doc for process.nextTick(callback) is that it adds callback() to the queue for the next tick. It doesn't say anything about waiting a tick or running the tick event loop before returning... so I read this code as adding 100 callbacks that do count++ to the TODO list for the next tick... ?? –  Paul Jun 4 '11 at 1:06
    
@Paul correct! /fyi #node.js IRC welcomes you: bit.ly/nodeIRC –  DTrejo Jan 22 '12 at 23:35

Locks and mutexes are indeed necessary sometimes, even if Node.js is single-threaded.

Suppose you have two files that must have the same content and not having the same content is considered an inconsistent state. Now suppose you need to change them without blocking the server. If you do this:

fs.writeFile('file1', 'content', function (error) {
    if (error) {
        // ...
    } else {
        fs.writeFile('file2', 'content', function (error) {
            if (error) {
                // ...
            } else {
                // ready to continue
            }
        });
    }
});

you fall in an inconsistent state between the two calls, when another function in the same script may be able to read the two files.

The rwlock module is perfect to handle these cases.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I thought. Isn't the other answer wrong? –  Matteo Mar 15 at 10:16
    
The answer isn't really wrong, because the question asks "Do I need to protect the internal array with some type of mutex?" –  sheldonh Apr 7 at 14:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.