Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Issue summary: Chrome requires hitting 'Enter' twice before submitting my form.

The gory details: I have a form. Its action is:

action="javascript: Search();"

I have a text input in my form. I type something in this textbox. I press enter. Search() is called.

Search() calls:

alert('A')
doPost(document.formName,'Search.php')
alert('B')

doPost(form,url) calls:

form.action=url
alert('C')
form.submit()
alert('D')

Now, the problem. FF pops up 'A', then 'C', then submits the form (yay!). Chrome, on the other hand, pops up 'A', then 'C', then 'D', then 'B', but no form submission (Boo!). Then, in frustration, I hit 'Enter' again in Chrome. form.submit() is called successfully (without any of the pop ups).

Why is Chrome not submitting my form on the first attempt?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I'm not sure precisely about your problem, but I suspect your code should be refactored into a more standard setup.

Your form should just be...

<form action="Search.php" method="POST">
     <input type="text" /> 
     <!-- Blah blah whatever else is in here -->
     <input type="submit" />
</form>

Why is javascript getting involved at all?


FYI: This may have something to do with your problem. From the jQuery Submit doc

Depending on the browser, the Enter key may only cause a form submission if the form has exactly one text field, or only when there is a submit button present. The interface should not rely on a particular behavior for this key unless the issue is forced by observing the keypress event for presses of the Enter key.

share|improve this answer

you should end each javascript statements with semicolon ;

you did not use any semicolon to end your statements.

share|improve this answer
1  
Using a semicolon is good practice because it will help you visualize your code structure more easily, but semicolon-less Javascript is still perfectly valid Javascript. –  Chris W. Mar 30 '11 at 6:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.