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I have come to accept that there is more than one way to do multiple inheritance in javascript. What I don't understand is how to call parent functions. I do it like so

function person(name){
 this.name=name;
 this.display=function(){alert(this.name);}
 this.personDisplay=this.display; //pointer to parent function
}
function employee(name,ID){
 this.person=person;
 this.person(name);
 this.ID=ID;
 this.display=function(){this.parentDisplay();alert(this.ID);}
}

but I was wondering if there was a correct way to reuse parent functions such as

function employee(name,ID){
 this.person=person;
 this.person(name);
 this.ID=ID;
 this.display=function(){parent.display();alert(this.ID);} //ideally what I want
}
share|improve this question
    
This doesn't seem to be multiple inheritance? For single-inheritance class-based constructors, there are several methods and techniques. However, you are strongly urged to adopt a JavaScript framework that does all of this for you. I personally recommend the Dojo Toolkit. – Stephen Chung Mar 30 '11 at 7:38
    
Sorry, I don't know why I called it multiple inheritence. I meant extending functions. – puk Mar 30 '11 at 7:50
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not multiple inheritance. Only single inheritance.

In JavaScript, to mimic class-based object-oriented programming, you'll need to use the prototype. JavaScript technically is a prototypical language, not an object-oriented one, but you can simulate OO-style classes quite successfully.

Using the prototype is usually "clasical" or "pseudo-classical" style.

Or you can use the "functional" style popularized by Douglas Crockford (just Google it).

Michael Bolin has a good article discussing these two styles.

Most OO implementations in JavaScript are variants of these two styles.

You are strongly urged to adopt a JavaScript library that does all of this for you. My personal recommendation is the Dojo Toolkit.

share|improve this answer
    
@Stephen: I just went over all the Dojo tutorials, and they did not mention inheritance. Although it does seem to be a lot better than standard javascript. What about, jQuery, do you recomend that as well? Thanx – puk Mar 30 '11 at 9:39
    
jQuery AFAIK does not have a standard class-based mechanism, although there are a few popular plugins. Dojo is very object-oriented. Check out the Quick Start Guide dojotoolkit.org/reference-guide/quickstart/index.html and look for dojo.declare. – Stephen Chung Mar 30 '11 at 9:59
    
@stephen: I have to agree Dojo significantly improves javascript. – puk Mar 30 '11 at 10:15
    
@puk, not just Dojo. There are a number of popular JavaScript libraries out there. You should look at them all before making your choice. That choice is likely going stick with you for yeras. – Stephen Chung Mar 30 '11 at 10:43
    
@Stephen, @puk: "...although there are a few popular plugins..." And soon to be another one; I've been planning to release mine as a jQuery plug-in for some time, and expect to get to it soon. ;-) @puk: Prototype also has an inheritance mechanism, although bewarned that its approach to supercalls is very easy to use but very, very expensive at runtime; details here. Mind you, 90% of the time, you really don't care 'cause you're not calling these in a tight loop. But when you do... – T.J. Crowder Mar 30 '11 at 10:54

I'm not quite following your code (you refer to a parentDisplay function that isn't defined anywhere; did you meant personDisplay?), but if you want to take advantage of JavaScript's prototypical inheritance, you can't use any property on this to refer to the parent because you'll run into the grand-child problem: It's easy to create a parent/child hierarchy that way, but it fails as soon as you try to create a grandparent/parent/child hierarchy. This is because the object instance is always a child, even when parent code is running, and so if parent code tries to use the same property to refer to its parents' code, it ends up referring back to itself and recursing until the stack runs out.

So you use something other than a property on this. My solution is to use a property on the function instances themselves and a bit of plumbing. When defining the subclass, you assign the superclass's version of the function to a property on the subclass's version of the function. Then code at all levels can use that property to refer to the parent version of the function.

I outline this in detail in this blog post: Simple, Efficient Supercalls in JavaScript. Using the helper created in the article, you can then do this:

var Parent = Helper.makeClass(function(){
    function foo() {
        return "P";
    }
    return {foo: foo};
});

var Child = Helper.makeClass(Parent, function(){
    function foo() {
        return foo.$super.call(this) + " < C";
    }
    return {foo: foo};
});

var GrandChild = Helper.makeClass(Child, function(){
    function foo() {
        return foo.$super.call(this) + " < GC";
    }
    return {foo: foo};
});

var gc = new GrandChild();
alert(gc.hierarchy()); // Alerts "P < C < GC"

(I don't like to call them classes any more, they're not classes, they're constructor functions. But the article still has the makeClass name, so...)

Note the handy scoping functions so you can have utility functions for your "classes" that are completely hidden away from the outside world; and so your instance functions can have proper names, which is a good thing.

share|improve this answer
    
@Crowder: I was worried that I would have to do a lot of plumbing. Darn – puk Mar 30 '11 at 9:37
    
@puk: It's really not a lot of plumbing. The code in that article is fairly verbose for clarity purposes, but even the final result with full comments, support for mixins, and support for after-the-fact hierarchy mods (an edge case), it's only 217 lines; not that much to grok. In distribution terms, minified it's 2,115 chars; the Closure compiler in simple mode gets it to 1,242 chars and in advanced mode (you have to do a couple of minor edits to make it compatible with adv mode) it's 1,156 chars. – T.J. Crowder Mar 30 '11 at 10:01
    
@puk, that really isn't a lot of plumbing. @Crowder's implementation is really one of the shortest and simplest I've ever seen! Comprehensive enough to do real work, that is. However, I won't suggest you do it yourself though. – Stephen Chung Mar 30 '11 at 10:42

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