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I have two tables that needs to be linked together, I want to count the number of instances of the category in the name table

SELECT category.name, COUNT(name.category) as availability FROM
        category LEFT JOIN name ON name.category = category.name
        GROUP BY name.category

This is great but I want the query to only count the names that is not yet over now. So I add a WHERE condition time > now()

SELECT category.name, COUNT(name.category) as availability FROM
        category LEFT JOIN name ON name.category = category.name WHERE
        time > now()
        GROUP BY name.category

So far so good, this query returns only the rows that have the time that is farther from the future. But it isn't returning every category from the category table. This query returns only those categories that have instances from the name table that have set time farther from the future.

What I want is to return all the categories from the category table.. If the category don't have an instance in the name table, I still want it to return but the availability will be 0

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

If time is a column from the name table, then all conditions that should be applied to the left joined table must be done in the ON clause. Otherwise, the WHERE clause will transform it back into an INNER JOIN:

SELECT category.name, COUNT(name.category) as availability FROM
    category LEFT JOIN name ON name.category = category.name AND
    time > now()
    GROUP BY category.name

Basically, the WHERE clause applies to the entire (potential) result set that has been generated from your FROM clause (and all of your JOINs). The conditions in the where clause must be met by a row in this result set in order for further processing to occur. But in the case of a LEFT JOIN, if the join hasn't succeeded, the columns from that table will all be NULL. So unless your WHERE clause allows those columns to be NULL, they will not proceed further in the query.

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damien, i tried this query but it didn't work.. but it did return one row that have 0 availability. but it didn't return all rows of the category table.. thanks – Kevin Lee Mar 30 '11 at 8:48
    
@Kevin - it might be the GROUP BY clause - I've changed it to group based on the left table rather than the right now. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 30 '11 at 8:50
    
yes i changed the GROUP BY clause, but it is still returning the same thing.. i did get one row that has an availability of 0 – Kevin Lee Mar 30 '11 at 8:56
    
oh it works now.. didn't notice why it didn't work a while ago. i must have mispelled something.. thank you very much – Kevin Lee Mar 30 '11 at 9:03

First: you should have said which table holds the time column, or at least signal it in your SQL. I assume it is in the name table. In this case just substitute WHILE with AND like this:

SELECT category.name,
    COUNT(name.category) as availability
FROM category 
    LEFT JOIN name ON name.category = category.name AND name.time > now()
GROUP BY category.name
share|improve this answer
    
it didn't return all the rows from the category table.. – Kevin Lee Mar 30 '11 at 8:51
    
sorry i didn't notice the time, i did refer to the name table in my queries – Kevin Lee Mar 30 '11 at 8:54
    
@Kevin Lee I edited my aswer according to your comments. – vbence Mar 30 '11 at 8:56
    
it works now. thanks vbence! – Kevin Lee Mar 30 '11 at 9:03

Use an OUTER JOIN instead of an INNER JOIN to get all categories

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He uses a left join to get all categories. His problem is that the where clause filters out the records where there is no Name component because for those rows name.time is considered to be null. – Klas Lindbäck Mar 30 '11 at 8:44
    
i will look at the syntax of outer join.. currently i'm a newbie. so i don't have any idea on how to do outer joins.. but i will look for it. – Kevin Lee Mar 30 '11 at 8:57

What about this:

SELECT category.name, case when time > now() then COUNT(name.category) else 0 end 
    as  availability FROM
    category LEFT JOIN name ON name.category = category.name WHERE
    GROUP BY name.category
share|improve this answer
    
hey this works.. but is it slower to run this?? – Kevin Lee Mar 30 '11 at 8:53
    
This query accesses a field that isn't part of the GROUP BY clause. So how can it work? I'm a bit baffled. – Klas Lindbäck Mar 30 '11 at 9:00
    
Slower? Which statement is to be compared? Anyway, I don't think it will cause a performance issue in this query. – RollingBoy Mar 30 '11 at 9:02
    
ic, this is nice. never thought i can do if else in a query. thanks – Kevin Lee Mar 30 '11 at 9:05
    
You're welcome. – RollingBoy Mar 30 '11 at 9:08

I'm not sure about mysql but the following works in Oracle:

SELECT category.name, COUNT(name.category) as availability FROM
        category LEFT JOIN name ON name.category = category.name WHERE
        (name.category is null or name.time > now() )
        GROUP BY category.category
share|improve this answer
    
it didn't work in mysql – Kevin Lee Mar 30 '11 at 8:58

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