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In PHP, static methods can be called as if they were instance methods:

class A {
    public static function b() {
        echo "foo";
    }
}

$a = new A;

A::b();  //foo
$a->b(); //foo

Is there a way of determining inside of b() whether the method was called statically or not?

I've tried isset($this) but it returns false in both cases, and debug_backtrace() seems to show that both calls are actually static calls

array(1) {
  [0]=>
  array(6) {
    ["file"]=>
    string(57) "test.php"
    ["line"]=>
    int(23)
    ["function"]=>
    string(1) "b"
    ["class"]=>
    string(1) "A"
    ["type"]=>
    string(2) "::"
    ["args"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
  }
}
Foo
array(1) {
  [0]=>
  array(6) {
    ["file"]=>
    string(57) "test.php"
    ["line"]=>
    int(24)
    ["function"]=>
    string(1) "b"
    ["class"]=>
    string(1) "A"
    ["type"]=>
    string(2) "::"
    ["args"]=>
    array(0) {
    }
  }
}
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why would you need to know that anyways? –  Gordon Mar 30 '11 at 9:08
    
Both calls are static calls. It's a static function. The function itself should have no concept of a non-static context. Why do you think you need to know this? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 30 '11 at 9:11
    
+1 for "whether", though ;) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 30 '11 at 9:12
    
just curious - I was exploring the concept of (pseudo?) overloading in PHP => Class::method($instance1, $instance2, $param) vs. $instance1->method($instance2, $param) (w/ same method name) –  chriso Mar 30 '11 at 9:16
    
if it takes two params in one call and three in another, chances are the method does different things depending on those. Methods should do only one thing, so you should have two methods for that. If it's just for getting variable number of arguments, use func_get_args –  Gordon Mar 30 '11 at 9:26
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2 Answers 2

The isset trick only works if you don't declare the method explicitly as static. (Because that's exactly what turns the -> object invocation into a static call.)

Methods can still be called via class::method() if you don't use the static modifier.

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2  
This should have been a comment, perhaps. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 30 '11 at 9:12
3  
Calling a non-static method statically raises an E_STRICT notice as per http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.static.php –  chriso Mar 30 '11 at 9:12
    
@Chris: Yep. You will to decide between perceived code cleanliness or functionality. –  mario Mar 30 '11 at 9:14
2  
@Gordon you forgot to remove the static keyword –  chriso Mar 30 '11 at 9:18
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if(isset($this) && get_class($this) == __CLASS__) as shown here and here.

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this does not work with statically-defined methods. –  Igoru May 2 at 21:10
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