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I am using this pseudocode to retrieve some json files and put their content into the content div.

<html>
    <head>
        <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
        <title>Test</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="content"></div>
        <script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
            var my_files = ['http://example.com/file.json', 'http://example.com/file2.json'];
            var params = {
                format: 'json'
            };
            function _populate_content(arg){jQuery("#content").text(arg)}
            jQuery(my_files.each(function() {
                jQuery.ajax({
                    url: url,
                    dataType: 'jsonp',
                    data: params,
                    jsonpCallback: "_populate_content",
                });
            });
        </script>
        <div id="more_content"></div>
    </body>
</html>

It might take some time to retrieve the remote files. My question is: Will this code delay the loading and rendering of the "more_content"-div?

Would it be better to enclose the ajax retrieval in a $(document).ready() block?

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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Will this code delay the loading and rendering of the "more_content"-div?

No, because the Ajax call is asynchronous (not blocking).

Would it be better to enclose the ajax retrieval in a $(document).ready() block?

Yes. This will execute the Ajax call once the whole DOM is rendered.
While it might work without, you cannot be 100% sure that element with ID content is available when the Ajax call returns. As @BiAiB pointed out, the element will be available. It is still good practice though.


Btw, if you want your code to work in all browsers, you should use jQuery's each and not the built-in one:

jQuery.each(my_files, function() {
    jQuery.ajax({
        url: url,
        dataType: 'jsonp',
        data: params,
        jsonpCallback: "_populate_content",
    });
});

Maybe this is only a stripped down example, but does it make sense to load both URLs? The second call will override the results of the first one...

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1  
Actually, the #content node appear before the script, so it's ok in his case, but it's still better practice to use $(document).ready() anyway, in case that former condition isn't satisfied. –  BiAiB Mar 30 '11 at 9:16
    
In the example above, the div#content is before the AJAX call so that isn't a problem. Good thing to point out though. (+1) –  Samuel Liew Mar 30 '11 at 9:17
    
@BiAiB: Oh you are right... didn't notice that :) –  Felix Kling Mar 30 '11 at 9:17
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Short answer: no. Since you haven't defined 'async:false' in the .ajax() parameters, the javascript will execute asynchronously. This means that your my_files array will loop through and fire off asynchronous calls then continue on loading the page.

You may want to wrap your logic in $(document).ready(), but before doing that place a throbber in your more_content div to let the user know information is coming shortly.

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ajax calls are made asynchronous (unless you specify otherwise). So it won't delay your page loading.

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the ajax call is asynchronus, so no delay. if you put it into a document ready block, you enshure that the browser did render the whole page before doing the call ..

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Yes. The browser will block while those calls are made. You should instead do the work on page load so that the page is visible/rendered while the work is being done:

$(document).ready(function() {
  jQuery(my_files.each(function() {
     // etc...
  }));
});
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2  
As per api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax, the .ajax() call will not block unless async:false is set. –  Black Box Operations Mar 30 '11 at 9:12
    
Ah right, thanks for the clarification. Totally opposite to my understanding. Cheers! –  OJ. Mar 30 '11 at 20:39
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