Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

this is my code :

def a():
    print aa

def b():
    aa = 'aaaa'
    a()

b()

it show error :

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "g.py", line 12, in <module>
    b()
  File "g.py", line 10, in b
    a()
  File "g.py", line 6, in a
    print aa
NameError: global name 'aa' is not defined

the aa must be defined in the b function,

what can i do ,

thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Why do you think this should work? I have not encountered a language so far where this would work (but I still have some to learn ;)). –  Felix Kling Mar 30 '11 at 9:27
    
@Felix: There's dynamic scoping, which is all about this behaviour. But it speaks volumes about its pros and cons that it's almost extinct now (I only know Perl and Emacs Lisp, and the former allows both) and was abandoned by several languages that used to have it. –  delnan Mar 30 '11 at 13:54
    
@delnan: I see. Thank you. As I said, I don't know every language and those I know don't have this behaviour. If their would have been some more explanation like In Perl I can do this and this, but it does not seem to work in Python then it would have made more sense to me... –  Felix Kling Mar 30 '11 at 13:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

aa is only defined in the scope of b(). You can pull the variable definition out of the function or use it as an argument.

This should work:

def a():
    print aa

def b():
    global aa
    aa = 'aaaa'
    a()

b()

This should also work, of course:

def a(aa):
    print aa

def b():
    aa = 'aaaa'
    a(aa)

b()
share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it by 6 seconds. –  larsmans Mar 30 '11 at 9:26
    
beat me by 2... –  Jakob Bowyer Mar 30 '11 at 9:26
    
photo finish, eh? –  jm_toball Mar 30 '11 at 9:28
    
Damn right. But Ill +1 anyway. –  Jakob Bowyer Mar 30 '11 at 9:30
    
-1: Did you actually test it? It doesn't work. (hint. missing "global aa") –  camh Mar 30 '11 at 9:48

aa = 'aaaa' is local only to b() as a function. To print this inside a() you need to ether return it into a() like this

def a(arg):
    print arg

def b():
    aa = 'test'
    return a(aa)

Or (and this is the WORST way to do it. You should never do it this way, im only showing it as an explanation)

def b():
    global aa
    aa = 'test'
    a()
share|improve this answer
def a():
    global aa
    print aa

def b():
    global aa
    aa = 'aaaa'
    a()

b()

One solution, but is better to pass aa as argument to a()

share|improve this answer
    
So you basically copied my second example but without explaining its a BAD idea. –  Jakob Bowyer Mar 30 '11 at 9:30
    
I guess he must be really fast at copying then. I think we just all had the same ideas. So it's +1 for all –  jm_toball Mar 30 '11 at 9:33

I'd recommend using better names for your functions and variables - a(), b() are kind of meaningless. To get your code to work, you'll have to either make aa a global variable (not recommended) or pass it to the a function:

def a(aa):
    print aa  

def b():
    aa = 'aaaa'
    a(aa)

b()
share|improve this answer
aa = None

def a():
    print aa

def b():
    global aa
    aa = 'aaaa'
    a()

b()
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.