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Hey using this code I always end up with the number 1, why is this.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
int y;
int x = (y + 1);

int main()
{
   cin >> y;
   cout << x << endl;
   return 0;
}
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2  
Think about this: When will the value of x be computed and what is the value of y in that moment?. –  jfs Mar 30 '11 at 10:11
    
@jfs: For a non experienced user I can see why this code looks like it should work. This is indicative of a declarative style approach which is cognitively more natural for humans. Unfortunately is a lot harder to implement in programing languages which is why more languages are procedural rather than declarative. Thus statements like "Think about it" are not useful without an explanation. You are answering the question assuming the poster has the same cognitive model of how a language works (which is usually not true) and definitely not true here (since they are using a declarative model). –  Loki Astari Mar 30 '11 at 16:00
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3 Answers

The line:

int x = (y + 1);

doesn't auto-magically tie the value of x to be always y + 1. Because you're setting it when y is zero (as a file-level variable, y is be initialised to 0) and never changing it, x will be 1. If you want x to change with y, you should set x whenever y changes, such as with this:

#include <iostream>

int y, x;

int main (void) {
   std::cin >> y;
   x = y + 1;
   std::cout << x << std::endl;
   return 0;
}
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Perfect thank you a heap –  Cooper Corbett Mar 30 '11 at 10:13
    
+1 for "as a file-level variable, y is be initialised to 0" –  Kiril Kirov Mar 30 '11 at 10:25
    
That's an awful way to declare variables, and they are not initialized –  BЈовић Mar 30 '11 at 10:59
    
@VJo, yes, they'd probably be better as locals but then that wouldn't explain the results of the question, would it? And they are initialised. The standard states what they're set to if their not automatic scope (like locals). –  paxdiablo Mar 30 '11 at 11:52
    
@paxdiable Your answer is correct. My comment is just a nitpick ;) It is always better to initialize them to some value (then letting compiler to do it), and see this : securecoding.cert.org/confluence/display/seccode/… –  BЈовић Mar 30 '11 at 12:03
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because at initialisation y probably is set to 0 and thus x = 0 + 1 = 1; you have to use a function for obtaining your desired behaviour like

int yPlusOne(int y) { return y + 1};
int main() { 
    cin >> y;
    cout << yPlusOne(y) << endl; 
    return 0;
}
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Thankyou lots for your help –  Cooper Corbett Mar 30 '11 at 10:14
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This is not how the C++ works at all.

You defined the y variable, then the x variable with some initial value. In the main function, you load new value to y, but x stays unchanged. You need to write what to do with the value in y, so put the line x = y + 1 between the lines with input and output:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
int y;
int x;

int main()
{
   cin >> y;
   x = y + 1;
   cout << x << endl;
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
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