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I've made a CSS progressbar, using 2 overlapping elements. The CSS for the elements is as follows:

#status_progressbar {
  height: 22px;
  width: 366px;
  -moz-border-radius: 10px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
  border-radius: 10px;
  background: #000;
  cursor: pointer;
}
#status_progressbar_progress {
  height: 22px;
  background: #eee;
  float: right;
  -moz-border-radius: 0 10px 10px 0;
  -webkit-border-radius: 0 10px 10px 0;
  border-radius: 0 10px 10px 0;
  /* width controlled by Rails backend, using inline style */
}

Unfortunately, the background from the parent is partly visible at the right edge, as you can see clearly in this picture. Since the background from the child element should precisely overlap the parent element, I don't know why this is the case.

[Picture taken in Firefox 4]

Problem

Maybe someone could explain to me why this is happening and how to solve it?

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BTW - nice visual. Helped greatly. –  Dutchie432 Mar 30 '11 at 11:39
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An alternative COULD be to simply use the status_progressbar div (no children). Create an image that is wide enough (say 1000px) and the colour of your choice (personally i'd create one white 50% opacity).

then:

#status_progressbar {
  height: 22px;
  width: 366px;
  -moz-border-radius: 10px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
  border-radius: 10px;
  background: #000 url("/path/to/image') repeat-y 0 0;
  cursor: pointer;
}

I would then manipulate the background position property with javascript ALWAYS providing a px value NOT a % as %50 would center the image.

var prcnt = (YOURPERCENTAGE/100)* 366;
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No that doesn't work in my specific case, because the background of the active part of the progressbar is actually a linear gradient, not a color like in my example above. Since it's not possible to set multiple backgrounds yet, it won't work. Sorry I didn't clarify this in my original post. –  M. Cypher Mar 30 '11 at 12:33
    
???? not setting multiple backgrounds - just a background color and an image. move the image to the left to mimic progress. (PS you can set multiple back ground images now (though moving would be troublesome, also you can create gradients in css these days too). –  Ian Wood Mar 30 '11 at 12:39
    
Ah now I understood what you meant. I got it to work that way, thanks a lot. –  M. Cypher Mar 30 '11 at 13:21
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I think this happens because the browser tries to antialias the border and it probably does that by adjusting transparency so your under div is black and top gray so black gets trough. (don't quote me on this but thats atleast what seems logical to me).

Have you tried wrapping both status_progressbar and status_progressbar_progress in another div and give border-radius and overflow:hidden to that div?

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just tried it, but does't work. –  M. Cypher Mar 30 '11 at 11:18
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I was able to get a pretty good result by adjusting the CSS Slightly. (DEMO - Tested in Chrome & FF)

#status_progressbar_progress {
    ...
    margin-right:-1px; 
    ...
}

This just nudges the grey div to the right by a pixel. You can even up it to 2 pixels, which I think looks even better. Make sure you compensate for that pixel change in your calculations.

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Actually, I've come up with that solution myself, but it's not correct - if you zoom in and look very closely, you will see that a few pixels from the parent are still visible at the top and bottom edges of the border. –  M. Cypher Mar 30 '11 at 12:28
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You could try changing the border radius on the right hand side up by 1px on the background element. That might make it disappear behind the front

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Unfortunately, it doesn't, at least not completely. –  M. Cypher Mar 30 '11 at 12:35
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This is a known problem. One way around it, is by nesting rounded elements when you need a colored border. Pad the other box with the same amount as the width of the border.

More information can be found in this blog post by @gonchuki: Standards Compliancy is a lie (or, how all browsers have a broken border-radius)

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Ah. Sorry. I misread your question. You don't have a border in your element. The symptoms are exactly the same as in the blog post though. –  Erik Tjernlund Mar 30 '11 at 12:09
    
Ok but how do I fix it in my case? –  M. Cypher Mar 30 '11 at 12:41
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