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I've created an image to show my problem: http://www.freeimagehosting.net/uploads/b8ae513a60.jpg

As you can see now, the box with the black border has an automatic width that adjust to the content inside. The problem is that I want the size of the box to adjust to the width of the image inside. So if the image has a width like on the example (the red box), the text beneath should stop at the blue-dotted mark and go down to a new line..

But how do I do that?

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What's your existing HTML and CSS? –  BoltClock Mar 30 '11 at 10:54
    
There you go: pastehtml.com/view/1duy9p9.html –  Don Pedro Mar 30 '11 at 11:03
    
Will you be creating the image/caption content dynamically from a CMS or database? –  Marc Audet Mar 30 '11 at 11:21
    
Would a JavaScript/jQuery solution be useful? –  Marc Audet Mar 30 '11 at 11:23
    
The description text will be included dynamically from a database and I would prefer not using jQuery.. But if it can't be done in CSS only, i will try one of the jquery solutions in here –  Don Pedro Mar 30 '11 at 11:41
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6 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

the problem with your request is that if the div doesn't have a specific width the text doesn't "know" when to wrap and that's why it uses the width of the outter div...

So... You need to add a width to the outter div or in case of using a div that surrounds the image + text, a width in that div.

EDIT:

here you go: http://jsfiddle.net/jnmtu/

I made a test (on my example is the third one) with a table to test it first and to refresh my mind of how it works with tables, and then I applied it to the CSS way.

How it works:

You need to have a surrounding div that has a minimal width (1%), and make it display as a table; then the inner div (corresponding to the "cell") should have an auto height and hidden overflow, this is needed to "force" it to strech the div's width + height (it's a common trick).

NOTE: I haven't tested in Internet Explorer, it does work with Firefox and Safari.

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Thanks :)! Even though it's a tiny hack with width (1%), I still prefer this solution over jquery... –  Don Pedro Mar 31 '11 at 11:11
1  
tiny hack, I like that pun :) anyway, CSS has some shortcomes compared to tables, this is one case. I tried it in most browsers and only IE7 (nevermind IE6) doesn't "like" this, it may be possible to make it work, I suppoose with another hack it may be solveable. Even so it's wonderfull to know that it can be done. –  jackJoe Mar 31 '11 at 14:43
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What would be needed is an width attribute like availabe in Android layouts, which is named width: wrap-content. Maybe this would be a good proposal for CSS, as it has proven handy in designing screens.

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@JackJoe said it well, you need to set a width to the wrapping div to match the width of the inner image.

Here is one way of doing it: http://jsfiddle.net/audetwebdesign/bpN8x/

Basically, I use jQuery to determine the width of the image and then set the width of the wrapper div.

Alternatively, if you were feeding the image from a CMS, you could determine the width of the image dynamically and then set the width on the wrapper div using an inline style.

I don't think a CSS-only is possible because of the way the box-model determines widths as content is laid out. Widths are inherited from the parent element, and are not passed up from the children elements.

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Yearh, I knew there was a "workaround" with jquery, but i just hoped it could be fixed with CSS instead.. Your solution works, but I'll just wait and see if there's a CSS solution also - hope that's okay ;) –  Don Pedro Mar 30 '11 at 11:49
    
I am curious too, this html/css pattern is not as obvious as I thought, so it will be interesting to see other answers. Appreciate your feedback. –  Marc Audet Mar 30 '11 at 11:56
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If I understood you correctly,

If the image is the same size as the div (Black border) then the text will automatically do what you want. Or try overflow: none; on the div.

But, personally I wouldnt do it like that. Divs are flexible and scalable So I would say use 2 or 3 divs within each other.

e.g.

<div id="black-border">

<div id="for-image">

<div id="the-image-itself">
<img src="image.jpg"/>
</div>

<div id="the-comment">
<p> This image is awesome</p>
</div>

</div>

</div>

just give the image a fixed size and enter the comment. you can also set

#the-image-itself, #the-comment{
display: block;
}

If you like

hope this helps :)

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I'm think you misunderstood me :) Have you seen the HTML example i've pasted? I want the describing text to have the same width as the image above.. Didn't work with your example unfortunately :( –  Don Pedro Mar 30 '11 at 11:18
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a Google search throws up the fact that this question has been asked a million times and that there is still no satisfactory way without attaching a width to the container

However...

This I think is a job best handled by the table element - the table element has a caption element which I would say is the tool for the job?

All browsers except IE6/7 handle the following bit of code well - IE6/7 handle it as far as the width goes, but it does not support the CSS caption-side property so it will not put the caption underneath the image - which may or may not be a problem - IMHO it will still look pretty (in those frames ;)) but YMMV, maybe an alternative if you really really don't want to script a width in

<div class="content">
<table summary="image with caption">
<caption>
Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Vestibulum tortor quam, feugiat vitae, ultricies eget, tempor sit amet, ante. Donec eu libero sit amet quam egestas semper. Aenean ultricies mi vitae est. Mauris placerat eleifend leo.
</caption>
<tr>
<td><img src="http://dummyimage.com/300x300/dad/fff" width="300" height="300" alt="This image is awesome"></td>
</tr> 
</table>
</div>

CSS:

.content {
  float: left;
  padding: 20px;
  border: 2px solid #000;
}

.content table {
  border: 0;
  border-collapse: collpase;
}

.content td {
  padding: 0;
}

.content caption { 
  caption-side: bottom; 
}
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if a table was used, it only needs a width of 1%, no need for the caption tag. Check my third item in my example. –  jackJoe Mar 30 '11 at 16:13
    
yes true, that would work too - but that way feels a lot more "hacky" to me - a hack for the width, and the use of a second row for the "caption" would technically be a hack too given that a table already does them, but it's certainly an option if you really really want the IE7 caption below - I simply went for the "why use a hack when a proper usage of the caption element will do" approach - that is after all what it is, no? ;) –  clairesuzy Mar 30 '11 at 16:35
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fwiw the smallest jquery I came up with is this

<div class="caption_wrap" style="float:right">
<img src="IMAG0332.jpg" onload="jQuery(this).parent().width(jQuery(this).width());"/><br />
this is some caption text, this is some caption text, this is some caption text, this is some     
caption text</div>

quick.

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